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Moving to Denver from the South? Snow? Ice? Cold?

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    Moving to Denver from the South? Snow? Ice? Cold?

    I'm interviewing for jobs to start next summer. There's one I really like in Denver, but I've never (pre or post injury) lived in any kind of place where it regularly snows.

    I've lived most of my life in the Carolinas so it might snow once or twice a year and immediately melt, every couple years there will be a bad ice storm and everything shuts down. If it's below freezing and it looks like there's a possibility of precipitation they'll close all the schools for a week and everyone apparently feels the need to eat five loaves of bread and drink three gallons of milk each (never did understand that one).

    I'm a mid-30s T-8 complete who drives a Honda Accord and gets around via a manual wheelchair. The potential job would be in the Lincoln Park neighborhood, which seems pretty much in the heart of Denver to me, and I would probably live within 1-2 miles because I prefer a downtown type lifestyle.

    But my job would absolutely 100%, no fail, require me to get there every single day. Like I'm responsible for people's lives and there is no one to back me up if I can't make it in for any reason.

    Driving across presumably well plowed streets of the inner city in snow doesn't frighten me, but if there is a lot of ice and slipperiness, I'm not sure I could handle that both in my car and in my wheelchair.

    Any of y'all lived in Denver? Care to share how bad the weather is there?

    Or any of you northerners, how do you get around in snow or ice?

    I'm thinking worst case scenario if it's trecherous outside I could call an Uber and make them do the driving, getting me door to door... surely Uber doesn't stop functioning just because the weather is bad... right?

    #2
    There is less snow in Denver than you might imagine...much more up in the mountains. I am sure some here will fill you in on the specifics.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      Originally posted by funklab View Post
      I'm interviewing for jobs to start next summer. There's one I really like in Denver, but I've never (pre or post injury) lived in any kind of place where it regularly snows.
      Good luck with the interviews! I've never been to Denver but being in the same city as Craig Hospital I can only imagine that there's a pretty good representation of folks with SCIs there. As for the weather, given our current climate crisis I'm not sure how many geographies are behaving true to their past reputations. But you're a science guy so best to rely more on the data than personal anecdote.

      https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/usco0105
      stephen@bike-on.com

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        #4
        Weather in Denver is very unpredictable, and prone to extremes of heat and cold. Traffic is awful, so snowstorms can make driving a real challenge, though the roads are well maintained. I agree with Stephen that anecdotal reports are much less useful than hard data, especially nowadays when seasons overlap in crazy ways.
        MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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          #5
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          There is less snow in Denver than you might imagine...much more up in the mountains. I am sure some here will fill you in on the specifics.

          (KLD)
          I'm not sure how much I was imagining, but when I looked it up an annual 60 inches was a lot more than I was expecting.

          Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
          Good luck with the interviews! I've never been to Denver but being in the same city as Craig Hospital I can only imagine that there's a pretty good representation of folks with SCIs there. As for the weather, given our current climate crisis I'm not sure how many geographies are behaving true to their past reputations. But you're a science guy so best to rely more on the data than personal anecdote.

          https://www.usclimatedata.com/climat...tates/usco0105
          Yeah, that's one of the many things that's attractive to me about Denver. Maybe I could even volunteer at Craig and do some good.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
            Weather in Denver is very unpredictable, and prone to extremes of heat and cold. Traffic is awful, so snowstorms can make driving a real challenge, though the roads are well maintained. I agree with Stephen that anecdotal reports are much less useful than hard data, especially nowadays when seasons overlap in crazy ways.
            If you're from Denver (or nearby), would you expect that I would be able to get to work somehow even during the worst snow and ice storms if i was living just a mile or two away over (hopefully well maintained) city streets in the heart of Denver? Or does the city sometime become inaccessible, at least to those of us rolling through life?

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              #7
              FWIW, what I recall from passing through Denver is how flat it is. If you, or rather when you do have to deal with snow flat is a good thing.
              I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                #8
                Originally posted by funklab View Post
                If you're from Denver (or nearby), would you expect that I would be able to get to work somehow even during the worst snow and ice storms if i was living just a mile or two away over (hopefully well maintained) city streets in the heart of Denver? Or does the city sometime become inaccessible, at least to those of us rolling through life?
                My husband and I used to travel regularly to Denver for medical care. We are 250 miles from Denver and have never lived there, but we've seen it in all kinds of conditions and it can be rough getting around during icy blizzard conditions, mainly because of traffic bottlenecks and mounds of plowed snow in narrow neighborhood streets. Hiways are well maintained, but commuters can spend hours each day negotiating traffic. Road construction and lane closures are constants. The main weather issues come from Denver being on the front range, where the plains meet the mountains - so some really bad snowstorms can sweep through, even though there are not so many of those anymore; the weather can change on a dime. Denver was pretty accessible for me with my leg brace and crutches, but I don't know how it would be with a chair. It would be great if you could find a place near Craig, because that neighborhood is quite accessible.

                You'd probably do fine in the city if you can find a place within a couple of miles of your work (as you say). Denver is crowded, but probably no more than any other city nowadays. There are great restaurants and coffee shops, and I always found the people very friendly. Medical facilities are excellent, particularly for SCI. The only reason we stopped going there is that the trip became too hard on us.

                Edited to add: I went to Swedish Medical Center in Englewood (a suburb), which is connected to Craig by a covered walkway...so in a limited sense, I know that neighborhood and it's very nice. Between Swedish and Craig, every medical need is covered.
                Last edited by Bonnette; 2 Sep 2019, 11:02 PM. Reason: Addition
                MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                  #9
                  Snow is for the young. Happy to never see another flake of it for as long as I live.
                  stephen@bike-on.com

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                    Snow is for the young. Happy to never see another flake of it for as long as I live.
                    I heard that! I love looking at snow, but arranging for shoveling and moving a car around for plows? No way.
                    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                      #11
                      Where will you be parking? Both where you live and where you work. Inside, underground, attached, or what? Will you need to traverse sidewalks to or from you car? This will make all the difference.

                      Obviously, where you live you can control/change, but your jobs location is/will be set.
                      Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

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                        #12
                        Statistics? Take them with a grain of salt. The # of snow days don't account for residual snow and ice. Let's say it snows 1 day but the snow lasts for of a week or more and then turns into ice for another week or more before going away. That's 2+ weeks of shitty weather but the stats say 1 day.

                        If you're lucky, the snow melts quickly. Look for stats that indicate not only # snow days but also # of days with snow/ice on the ground. Just be prepared for indefinite snow and ice even if the stats look good. Take it from someone who used to live in New England. Not a pretty picture for us.
                        Last edited by August West; 3 Sep 2019, 4:40 AM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Joe-MN View Post
                          Where will you be parking? Both where you live and where you work. Inside, underground, attached, or what? Will you need to traverse sidewalks to or from you car? This will make all the difference.

                          Obviously, where you live you can control/change, but your jobs location is/will be set.
                          i would get an apartment with a garage, so no shoveling snow for me, but I won’t be sure what the work parking situation is until I go for an interview. There’s a pretty good chance it will be a parking deck at the job too, but I’ll have to see how far that is from where I actually have to get to.

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                            #14
                            You would still need to clear snow from the driveway to the street. Look into hiring a local teenager to do this for you. Find out if the residential street you will be living on is on the list for plowing regardless of the amount of snow. Not sure how they do this in Denver, but when I was in Chicago, residential streets only got plowed for a snow event of 6 inches or more.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                              You would still need to clear snow from the driveway to the street. Look into hiring a local teenager to do this for you. Find out if the residential street you will be living on is on the list for plowing regardless of the amount of snow. Not sure how they do this in Denver, but when I was in Chicago, residential streets only got plowed for a snow event of 6 inches or more.

                              (KLD)
                              I'd never thought of checking to see if the apartment building is on a street listed for plowing. I guess that's pretty important information. Any idea how I can look that up?

                              I should have clarified, I don't mean a detached garage or a condo/townhome with a garage, I would prefer to live in a building with a parking garage (like 3 or 4 story garage underneath or adjacent to the building) so that I wouldn't have to ever worry about clearing a driveway or anything like that.

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