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lili pazmany's streetwear garments facilitate movement for people with disabilities

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    lili pazmany's streetwear garments facilitate movement for people with disabilities

    What do you think?

    https://www.designboom.com/design/li...27s+streetwear

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    #2
    Clever! Would like to see many more options for disabled women.

    Comment


      #3
      did I miss the mens' wear? Obvs its unisex anyway, but all I saw were female models?

      I guess if you aren't a rapper or on your way to do some graffiti this might not be your idea of style, but would like to hear what some higher quads have to say about the functionality of the straps? Over-done or the more the better? I don't bag, but would the strap at the bottom of the pant-leg be useful?

      As I'd done quite a bit of sewing (no clothing yet) this past winter I have begun to wonder what might be some useful mods for other crips.
      I've recently had the idea to re-locate the rear pockets of jeans to the inside of the leg below the knee, for wallet and keys. I'd think the items would stay in the pockets during transfers?

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        #4
        To me, the garment features are interesting but I prefer clothes that don't call attention to them. I occasionally see articles where mainstream clothing manufacturers get ink around initiatives to provide accessible clothing, but it often seems more like a PR play. On another note, has anyone ever seen articles about universal design in a high end architecture magazine? For homes, I've noticed that architects and magazines like this seem to design accessibility 'out' of a home rather than make it more accessible.

        Comment


          #5
          I don't care for these designs either, especially if you are talking about wearing this kind of clothing every day. I wouldn't have worn this type of clothing when I was younger, and definitely now in my 70s.

          Agree with "HockeyFan." These designs call attention to the disability because of all the strapping, funky clip on sleeves and the "gaiters" (gaiters are often worn by people who participate in snow shoeing, and X-country skiing to cover up the lower legs of their pants), and logos, Ugh!

          I'm struggling to think of where someone would wear these clothes.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by tooley View Post
            did I miss the mens' wear? Obvs its unisex anyway, but all I saw were female models?

            I've recently had the idea to re-locate the rear pockets of jeans to the inside of the leg below the knee, for wallet and keys. I'd think the items would stay in the pockets during transfers?
            I did that on several pair of jeans and used the pockets daily - I placed the pockets on the side of my pants below the knee - hardly noticeable and very reachable if you are right-handed. It seems if you had them on the inside of the legs they wouldn't be as easy to reach, but, yes, maybe less noticeable.
            The pockets are handy if you use drive through food - easy to tuck cash in the pocket instead of fumbling for a wallet.
            I don't know why "handicapped clothing" hasn't jumped on lower pockets.

            Comment


              #7
              Hmmmmmmm. I don't what you'd call that 'style' but my first gut reaction was 'ridiculous'. It takes all kinds to make the world go 'round, though, and I'm certainly no fashionista. A hard pass from me though.
              "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

              "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by triumph View Post
                I did that on several pair of jeans and used the pockets daily - I placed the pockets on the side of my pants below the knee - hardly noticeable and very reachable if you are right-handed. It seems if you had them on the inside of the legs they wouldn't be as easy to reach, but, yes, maybe less noticeable.
                The pockets are handy if you use drive through food - easy to tuck cash in the pocket instead of fumbling for a wallet.
                I don't know why "handicapped clothing" hasn't jumped on lower pockets.
                Nice. I knew I couldn't have been the first to think of this. But for me, inside of the leg seems better. I already keep my wallet and other crap in the pocket on the front of my Stimulite cushion, but if it's in the wash and I'm using another cushion I am lost without that pocket.

                The big clip on cuffs could actually be useful, if you were out in the woods or something, as sleeve/cuff savers. Damn near every hoody I own has some severity of distress on the lower sleeves (one reason I am sewing)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Oddity View Post
                  Hmmmmmmm. I don't what you'd call that 'style' but my first gut reaction was 'ridiculous'. It takes all kinds to make the world go 'round, though, and I'm certainly no fashionista. A hard pass from me though.
                  (not to McMurter you, but...) para vs. quad. The straps are definitely intended for someone with little to no hand function. I think a few quads I know would think it's worth a try, while others wouldn't be caught dead wearing anything that makes them look gimpier than they are (or perceive themselves)

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                    #10
                    Absolutely. Those straps would undoubtedly be helpful to a quad. Normal pants with straps pls.


                    Originally posted by tooley View Post
                    (not to McMurter you, but...) para vs. quad. The straps are definitely intended for someone with little to no hand function. I think a few quads I know would think it's worth a try, while others wouldn't be caught dead wearing anything that makes them look gimpier than they are (or perceive themselves)
                    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I want a pair of jeans that have the butt of them made of a soft sweatpant material. You can look stylish without hurting your delicate undercarriage skin plus they'd be easier to get on.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Those clothes are too fussy and attention-grabbing for my taste. Plus, those sewn-in straps for lifting the legs won't be of much help for people without arm and upper body strength. I have to use weak arms and wrists to lift my legs from underneath, or I'd never get out of my transport chair. It also looks like there'd be a lot of ironing involved to keep all those flaps straight.
                        MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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