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My terrifying experience

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    My terrifying experience

    The humidity was down yesterday so I thought I would do a little yardwork. Wild morning glories are taking over the fence between our backyard and the park behind our house, and they are obstructing the view. I have been pulling them out before they go to seed. After a few minutes by the fence I decided it was too hot. As I started to leave, I felt something hit my arm and the side of my face. It was enough to trigger my hyperactive startle reflex and for a moment I lost my balance. By the time I regained my balance my left arm and the left side of my face and neck were covered with bees. Apparently I ran over their nest in the grass beside the fence. To get away I had to have my right hand on the joystick that controls my wheelchair. Consequently, I could not beat them off. I did stop momentarily a couple of times to knock some off my ear. In doing so I knocked my sunglasses off. No stopping to pick them up. After I got 30-40 feet away most of the bees turned back but a few followed me all the way into the house. I headed straight for the Benadryl. I also took some Tylenol at WebMD?s suggestion. The real story was the pain. In the 63 + years of my spinal cord injury I have never experienced such excruciating pain. My left arm and side of my face and neck throbbed. When I took off my pants last night I found sting blotches all the way up to my knees. They even had gotten into my pant legs. In the wee hours of the morning the pain began to abate. Then my arm and face started to itch. I did not sleep at all last night. Currently I have moderate pain and itching. Cortaide is controlling the itching pretty good.

    If I had gotten stuck in a hole or something by the fence I am convinced that I would be dead now. Getting away was my only option. I do not know what kind of bees they were. They seem pretty common around here. They are about a third the size of honey bees, and have black abdomens with yellow stripes like most bees have. Obviously, they live in the grass or ground.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

    #2
    How absolutely awful! Yes, if you'd been unable to get away, you could very well have been killed. I think it's worth a trip to the ER to get a strong prescription cortisone cream, and perhaps an injection to control the histamine reaction you're experiencing - even though you're better today, histamine is still being released as your body tries to heal. Wow, I'm so sorry this happened to you! And glad you're alive to talk about it!

    Edited to add: It sounds like you bumped into a nest of yellowjackets. Meanest stingers around. If you go to the ER, it might help to take a dead one with you, if you can find one - sometimes knowing what stung you helps docs to know the most efficient ways to treat you, though of course it all comes down to histamine.
    Last edited by Bonnette; 1 Sep 2018, 2:38 PM.
    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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      #3
      Yup, I've encountered them too, we call them yellow jackets. They typically live in the ground or rotted wood. When disturbed, even a little, they will go after you big time. And as noted their stings pack a punch.

      Comment


        #4
        Is this the critter?

        NL was digging in our garden and disturbed an underground nest and a wreath of yellow jackets covered her head and stung a number of times. Hit the ER quickly because she has been known to go into anaphylactic shock from been stings.
        Attached Files

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          #5
          gjnl, that's ghastly. It's bad to be stung anywhere, but her head! Really dangerous. My friend Karen stepped on a nest and they stung her all over her legs. Those critters are something else.
          MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by gjnl View Post
            Is this the critter?

            NL was digging in our garden and disturbed an underground nest and a wreath of yellow jackets covered her head and stung a number of times. Hit the ER quickly because she has been known to go into anaphylactic shock from been stings.
            I have just been told by a neighbor that it is a member of the yellow jacket family: https://www.insectidentification.org...n-Yellowjacket
            You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
            http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

            See my personal webpage @
            http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

            Comment


              #7
              Terrible experience, potentially lethal.

              I have been dealing with some mud daub wasps. Once I was able to identify learned they are pretty much live and let live unless they feel threatened. I will remove or have someone remove small nests from a porch area when the weather gets cold.

              From reading your description sounds like you are dealing with some mean ones. Trying to outrun on foot would be a nightmare, can't imagine fleeing in a chair.

              Sorry it happened glad you made it through!

              Comment


                #8
                Does anybody remember the X Files episode where telephone linemen and kids and a teacher in a playground were swarmed by bees engineered to kill? That's what angry yellowjackets act like.
                MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

                Comment


                  #9
                  Goodness. Glad you made it out of their. My heart does not enjoy bee stings. It goes into a painful beat and squeezes for a touch too long. Feels like every beat could be the last.

                  I hope they leave you alone.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    And then this experience conjures up the Alfred Hitchcock movie...Birds. They were scary critters too...going for your eyes, ears, and nose...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Glad it sounds like your ok. I had a similar experience around 25 years ago. I was way out in my back yard on my Tractor and hit a nest. My dog was with me too. They attacked me and the dog. I headed back to the house as fast as I could with the dog running alongside me. Ended up with a lot of Stings but was ok. But it was a pretty crazy experience.
                      "Life is about how you
                      respond to not only the
                      challenges you're dealt but
                      the challenges you seek...If
                      you have no goals, no
                      mountains to climb, your
                      soul dies".~Liz Fordred

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Yep, a yellow jacket is actually a type of hornet, not a bee. They typically live in burrow in the ground. Very painful stings...worse that a bee. You should get an exterminator out who dig out the whole nest. Not a do-it-yourself job.

                        https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Isqj_iCObsU

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                          #13
                          Just a brief note to let you know that I have pretty much recovered from the bee stings. I just have a few blotches where multiple stings were close together. There are also a couple of sting spots that feel like they have stingers in them but do not. It is interesting that there was not a single sting on my right arm or face side. I am not sure how to interpret that. lol
                          You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                          http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                          See my personal webpage @
                          http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                            Yep, a yellow jacket is actually a type of hornet, not a bee. They typically live in burrow in the ground. Very painful stings...worse that a bee. You should get an exterminator out who dig out the whole nest. Not a do-it-yourself job.

                            https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Isqj_iCObsU

                            (KLD)
                            I assure you that this will not be a do-it-yourself job done by me.
                            You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                            http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                            See my personal webpage @
                            http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
                              Just a brief note to let you know that I have pretty much recovered from the bee stings. I just have a few blotches where multiple stings were close together. There are also a couple of sting spots that feel like they have stingers in them but do not. It is interesting that there was not a single sting on my right arm or face side. I am not sure how to interpret that. lol
                              Very glad to hear you're doing fine, thanks for the update!
                              MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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