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ER physician with SCI

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    ER physician with SCI

    Anyone else hear this on NPR?

    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2018/...ntent=20180606

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    #2
    Pretty good story. Thanks for sharing.
    I love how the doc "calls" it transferring.
    Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

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      #3
      I heard it. Part 2 is supposed to be today. I'm impressed with his determination to keep practicing.

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        #4
        I've not listened yet, but my wife heard parts. It sounds like he doesn't have nerve pain?
        (I'm at work now so cannot listen). I guess I should keep a spare set of clothes here, but I cannot dress on a toilet as I hit my tipping point too easily. I need a mat or something.
        T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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          #5
          It sounds like he doesn't have nerve pain?
          Not everyone with SCI does have severe neuropathic pain. The literature says it is about 60%. He is also fairly newly injured...neuropathic pain tends to worsen with aging.


          Just listened to Part 2. Not on-line yet. Will post the link when it is available.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            It's gotta be pretty hard learning to redo things as a gimp. I changed careers completely (if you can call what I did before a "career") after my injury, so all of my new skills were learned from sitting down height. Gotta be frustrating as hell to try and intubate somebody from a chair after you've been doing it for ten years standing up.

            It sounds like he's got a lot of irons in the fire, including being the medical director of a health insurance startup, so it sounds like he's not doing full time ED work (the article mentions four times a month), which is probably good. That's one of the least accessible medical specialties because of the variety of physical tasks you have to do while navigating a wide variety of physical environments and obstacles. Certainly it can be done, like anything, but the question is whether or not it's worth it in the long run.

            I'm pretty sure there was a quad ER doc who went back to work, he had somebody with him at all times to do the physical parts, so the possibilities are definitely there. Where there's a will and enough $$$ there's a way.

            I bet his transfers are already way better than four and a half minutes. He sounds like an active guy, he can get it down to 30 seconds.

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              #7
              I agree, funklab. I did have a client who was a vascular surgeon when he sustained his C6 injury. He actually decided to change his specialty to internal medicine, went back and did an internal medicine residency, and practiced for a number of years, with a nurse practitioner in his office who did a lot of the physical procedures needed.

              I also know a number of physiatrists who are in chairs, as well as several radiologists, psychiatrists, and neurologists, but he is the first ED physician I have heard of. He did say in the audio version of the story (which is abbreviated in the text link above) that he spent a good amount of time in Mayo's simulation lab re-learning to do procedures such as intubation, central lines, etc. from a seated position before he went back to work.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #8
                http://www.newmobility.com/2010/10/q...ors-in-or-out/

                Quad doctor did it a long time ago with a physician assistant (conveniently his wife).

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                  #9
                  I had to take a few steps backwards; I'm an engineer again after 17 years as an executive. Companies just can't figure out leadership from a chair. I'm working on climbing back, but enjoying keeping my mind off the neuropathy.
                  T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                    He did say in the audio version of the story (which is abbreviated in the text link above) that he spent a good amount of time in Mayo's simulation lab re-learning to do procedures such as intubation, central lines, etc. from a seated position before he went back to work.

                    (KLD)
                    Yeah, that part was in the text article too, I'm just sure it's really annoying to have done it as your job for a decade the "right way" and then have to sacrifice your technique and learn an "adaptive" way to get stuff done. I used to teach swim lessons pre-injury, helping train people for triathlons and open water swims. After my injury I went swimming a couple times. I wasn't going to drown or anything, but swimming laps slowly with such a compromised stroke was so annoying to me that I didn't get back in the water for almost another decade, because I knew what it was to do it the right way and I definitely can no longer do it the right way.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Mize View Post
                      I had to take a few steps backwards; I'm an engineer again after 17 years as an executive. Companies just can't figure out leadership from a chair. I'm working on climbing back, but enjoying keeping my mind off the neuropathy.
                      Yeah, companies are still stuck in that 6'4", chiseled jaw, led his high school team to the football state championship,... mentality.

                      Fantastic story about the ER doc as well.

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                        #12
                        Excellent piece, thanks KLD.

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