Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

getting old

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    I am 80 and have 63 years as a C-7 complete quad. Most of that time was spent pushing a manual chair, including the 55+ lb. E&J wheelchairs that were "the" chair for serious wheeling until the 1980s. About 15 years ago I switched to a power assist, and about 6 years ago I had to go to a full power chair. At the same time I quit driving. Both were due to shoulder pain. The pain was especially severe when I had to make sharp turns when driving my van. It came to the point that I just winced and wanted to let go of the steering wheel. I did not want to risk an accident and perhaps make another SCI. I regret abusing my shoulders, but no one expected us to become oldtimers. There is a good deal of knowledge now, and I try to encourage younger SCIs to make maintaining shoulder health a priority, along with pressure sore prevention. There is a link to a very good manual dealing with shoulder health near the bottom of this post. Having to quit driving has been a major blow to my independence and quality of life. This aging process is like going through rehab in reverse.
    You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
    http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

    See my personal webpage @
    http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
      I am 80 and have 63 years as a C-7 complete quad. Most of that time was spent pushing a manual chair, including the 55+ lb. E&J wheelchairs that were "the" chair for serious wheeling until the 1980s. About 15 years ago I switched to a power assist, and about 6 years ago I had to go to a full power chair. At the same time I quit driving. Both were due to shoulder pain. The pain was especially severe when I had to make sharp turns when driving my van. It came to the point that I just winced and wanted to let go of the steering wheel. I did not want to risk an accident and perhaps make another SCI. I regret abusing my shoulders, but no one expected us to become oldtimers. There is a good deal of knowledge now, and I try to encourage younger SCIs to make maintaining shoulder health a priority, along with pressure sore prevention. There is a link to a very good manual dealing with shoulder health near the bottom of this post. Having to quit driving has been a major blow to my independence and quality of life. This aging process is like going through rehab in reverse.
      Much respect to you, 55!They instilled fear n me at WWRC in 1972 to NOT get a pressure sore and, knock on wood, after almost 46 years, I've never had one. Did you know Dr. O'Hanlon when you were there? They didn't, however, warn us about shoulder wear.
      "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

      Comment


        #18
        Never aware of 'shoulder health' until it crept up on me this year and got my undivided attention.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by DeadEye View Post
          Much respect to you, 55!They instilled fear n me at WWRC in 1972 to NOT get a pressure sore and, knock on wood, after almost 46 years, I've never had one. Did you know Dr. O'Hanlon when you were there? They didn't, however, warn us about shoulder wear.
          Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
          You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
          http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

          See my personal webpage @
          http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
            Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
            I was injured in Vermont in 78’ , that same year I moved to Virginia after rehab. Years later when I went to work for a disability agency and met a lot of other wheelers it always impressed me how well most folks who had rehabbed at WWRC manage / managed their disability.

            Comment


              #21
              Jen, what did you have done for the trigger finger? The middle finger of my left hand has been injected with cortisone twice (5 years apart) to reduce the size of the node on the tendon. I have seen that a surgical solution is posssible, but the coritsone does not need any recovery time, just takes a week or two for the node to shrink.
              Don - Grad Student Emeritus
              T3 ASIA A 27 years post injury

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
                Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
                Absolutely, we referred to it as Boot Camp. They worked you hard all day, every day, but it made us tough. I am appalled at the lack of knowledge new SCIs hold when they leave rehab these days. That's by no means a put down to the individuals. I just feel that modern day rehab is not as thorough as they were in our "old days". 'm sure the short length of time they're in rehab now days contributes.
                "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

                Comment


                  #23
                  Great thread. I'm a relative newbie, 65 years old but only seven years as a C7 complete quad in a manual chair. I understand the dangers of transfers, but how about just pushing my chair on level or moderately uphill roads? I can find little for postings or literature about this, perhaps because some pushing is unavoidable except by resorting to power or power assist. I choose to push more than I have to as I get exercise by rolling around the neighborhood.

                  BTW, Donno, I had surgery for a trigger finger several years prior to SCI. It was sore for a couple of months afterwards, but the trigger finger was cured. I was an active sailboat racer, so it got lots of use. Cortisone had provided little relief.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by SCIfor55+yrs. View Post
                    Yes, I knew him. He supposedly invented the cut out seat boards that we used with foam cushions on those E&J chairs. Those 7 miles of hallways took a toll on my shoulders. Some had a pretty steep grade. Coated pushrims had not yet been available. I had to use the tires as pushrims to get up some of them. In my autobiography I referred to WWRC as the "Parris Island" of rehab centers.
                    SCI 55: Is your autobiography available?

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by triumph View Post
                      SCI 55: Is your autobiography available?
                      It has not been published. It was done at the request of family and friends. However, a condensed version can be viewed by going to the link at the bottom of my posts.
                      You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                      http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                      See my personal webpage @
                      http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                      Comment


                        #26
                        71 years old today with almost 48 years on wheels. Still using a manual chair with a couple of bad shoulders. Had a shot of cortisone in right shoulder about a year ago which helped a little. Also was referred to PT that didn't work out well from the therapist viewpoint. She wouldn't let me do anything other than range of motion for fear of hurting myself. Like the rest of you older folks, rehab was hell but it worked and after almost 5 months we were released to the new world of SCI. Keeping active in any way is a key point in my view. Good luck to all.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by triumph View Post
                          SCI 55: Is your autobiography available?
                          I found it very interesting after reading it a while back.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            In addition to all the joint issues, is anyone else having trouble with their immune system as the post-injury years clock on and on? I've recently had two infections normally only seen in people with severely compromised immunity. I also have near constant mouth abrasions that take weeks to heal. I do what I can diet and supplement-wise to maintain immune health, but I feel like I've hit a tipping point and it's nothing but downhill now.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Donno View Post
                              Jen, what did you have done for the trigger finger? The middle finger of my left hand has been injected with cortisone twice (5 years apart) to reduce the size of the node on the tendon. I have seen that a surgical solution is posssible, but the coritsone does not need any recovery time, just takes a week or two for the node to shrink.
                              I opted for surgery as my finger had turned purple once or twice while using it. Also, it clicked and would get stuck to the point where carrying earrings or coins would mean I would have to use my other hand to unlock the finger.

                              It took a week if that to recover. So, soooooo worth it! Oops - almost forgot to add! Because of the nervous tissue tumour removal, I lost the feeling of that finger from the second knuckle up. It's been 15 months and has not returned

                              I popped a stitch while getting into bed that very night ... I left the stitches in for a week and removed them myself. Kept up with stretching and it's perfectly fine today! My thumb is next but was thinking about the injection for that .. still thinking on it because sometimes it gives out when I push my chair.

                              This was my surgeon:



                              Surgical incision photos (nervous tissue tumour on upper, trigger finger in the palm):
                              Attached Files
                              Last edited by lynnifer; 2 Apr 2018, 3:29 AM.
                              Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                              T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by Scaper1 View Post
                                In addition to all the joint issues, is anyone else having trouble with their immune system as the post-injury years clock on and on? I've recently had two infections normally only seen in people with severely compromised immunity. I also have near constant mouth abrasions that take weeks to heal. I do what I can diet and supplement-wise to maintain immune health, but I feel like I've hit a tipping point and it's nothing but downhill now.
                                My father has some immune system problems that are long standing, and they have also worsened with age.

                                Have you seen an Immunologist for a full assessment and recommendations? I really recommend it. You need to make sure you are up on all your immunizations, and they will have different recommendations for you and will check to make sure your body is making antibodies appropriately after having an immunizations. You also may need to respond more quickly and more aggressively when you get an infection.

                                My Dad is a 75 year old incomplete para, with aging related issues including deconditioning, carpal tunnel on both hands, shoulder issues, more fatigue, more medications with more side effects from other non-SCI problems. We try to do PT and OT as soon as they are needed if he starts declining or develops a flare of his pain or a new complaint. It really helps.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X