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  • Eclipse

    The Solar Eclipse is about 50% at this moment here on the West Coast. Looking a lot like sunset right now. Not sure what the big deal is....thousands driving to view points to watch it.
    "Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed." - Hunter Thompson
    T5/6 complete

  • #2
    Got pretty dark here, with about 96 percent coverage. My cat was really freaking out.
    T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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    • #3
      Solar Eclipse - Did You See It?

      Did you see the solar eclipse? Did you see it in totality?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rook98006 View Post
        The Solar Eclipse is about 50% at this moment here on the West Coast. Looking a lot like sunset right now. Not sure what the big deal is....thousands driving to view points to watch it.
        Wow, in Olympia you should have had about a 95% eclipse at about 10:25 AM. Are you sure it was only 50% (perhaps you were looking too early)? My sister from Anacortes is camping in Idaho in an area where it should be 98%. Waiting to see her photos.

        Here in San Diego we had a 58% at about 10:30 AM, but it was still very cool viewed with the special glasses. The clouds cleared up from our usual morning overcast just in time. Went to an eclipse brunch and viewing which was a great way to do the viewing.

        Originally posted by WC_Sage View Post
        Did you see the solar eclipse? Did you see it in totality?
        Where are you? No location on your profile.


        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        • #5
          The big deal is that there won't be another crossing North American until 2052! I'm 45 ... I won't be seeing the next. lol
          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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          • #6
            Actually, that is not the case. There will be another in 2024. https://www.greatamericaneclipse.com/future/

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            • #7
              I could have sworn I saw the end of the world approaching! Scary I tell you.

              We had some fairly ideal overcast/clouds for great viewing with no glasses. Pretty neat seeing the moon travel over. I think we were around 85% coverage around here.

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              • #8
                By the time I came online and posted it was more than 50%. Started to get a charlie horse in my neck so I gave my glasses to another. Kept waiting for it to go dark but it didn't get close. More like a couple weeks ago when the air was smokey from all the fires. Except it is a cloudless bluebird day. Surprised the temp dropped around 15 degrees for a half hour.
                "Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed." - Hunter Thompson
                T5/6 complete

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                • #9
                  Andy, you crack me up. I love it. I always get a laugh from your quips and zingers.
                  I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

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                  • #10
                    Ha, I noticed the temperature drop also, lol. Pretty neat. I had a sheet of paper and binoculars to project the eclipse for when it was too bright, which worked, but the neatest was the clouds tempering the light for ideal viewing

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Andy View Post
                      Ha, I noticed the temperature drop also, lol. Pretty neat. I had a sheet of paper and binoculars to project the eclipse for when it was too bright, which worked, but the neatest was the clouds tempering the light for ideal viewing
                      I did the binocular thing too, but used a tripod for stability. The binoculars were pretty much in direct line between the image and the sun. But, and this makes no obvious sense. But the two lenses, incoming and outgoing whatever they are called did not line up in the path I just described. They were at least 20 degrees out of line. Being out of line made it a little difficult to set the tripod up since I could not point the binoculars at the sun. I had to point it 20 degrees or so away from the sun. I don't understand it. The light rays to the binoculars are somehow different than those to me?
                      I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Andy View Post
                        Ha, I noticed the temperature drop also, lol. Pretty neat. I had a sheet of paper and binoculars to project the eclipse for when it was too bright, which worked, but the neatest was the clouds tempering the light for ideal viewing
                        I peaked naked eye, but at that time we had moved to a clear sky area. Someone handed me solar viewers for a moment, so I saw it four ways, naked peek, solars, binocular projection, and pinhole projector. We took a picture of binocular projection.
                        I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                          They were at least 20 degrees out of line. Being out of line made it a little difficult to set the tripod up since I could not point the binoculars at the sun. I had to point it 20 degrees or so away from the sun. I don't understand it. The light rays to the binoculars are somehow different than those to me?
                          Yeah, I was wondering about that too. Total non-aiming thing going on with my binoculars also, weird.

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                          • #14
                            A shot from my neck of the woods, done with a Nikon DSLR camera (had the view screen turned so only the camera was looking at the sun and moon)

                            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                            "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                            "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

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                            • #15
                              I traveled from Chicago to St Louis to be in the path of totality.

                              I agree, it's pretty boring unless you're able to view the TOTAL ECLIPSE. Watching the moon slowly move over the sun for 90 minutes was boring as hell. Things only started to get interesting then the moon was 90% blocking it.

                              It started to get dark. But not a normal evening dark. Like an unnatural dimming of the universe. When it was completely covering, it was like bright moonlight, but the color of the sun. Also very weird. The birds stopped chirping and the crickets came out.

                              Just before and just after totality there were these weird shadow ripples passing over the ground. Like fast water ripples, but in shadow.

                              The actual eclipse looked exactly like the pictures. Bright white ring around a pitch black hole. With streaks of light shooting out from the ring.

                              The best and most interesting part of the eclipse only lasted for 3-4 minutes, but it was pretty cool. Kind of like a cosmic magic trick.

                              Was it worth the trip? I think so. I hadn't been to St Louis for a while - went to some museums and ate a lot of ribs. I took the train so I could read and sleep, etc.

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