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    Northern states - snow

    Hi. I'm from southern Oklahoma and we rarely get a good snow. Lots of ice, but it usually melts within a couple of days anyway. My question is for those who live in northern states, especially CO, MT, WY. I have a manual push chair and am pretty independent, most of the time lol, but was wondering how you get around during the fall/winter or heavy snow months. Tips, tricks, advice... I'm hoping to visit soon and possibly make a move next year. Thanks for reading my post!

    #2
    This is complicated, so I'll try to keep it simple by saying that your best friend is the forecast. If there is a chance of a lot of snow try to get your stuff done before it starts. Check the temp for the days you will be there. If above 25 degrees I would say that most roads, sidewalks etc should be clear of any ice or snow.

    Bottom line, getting around is not going to be as hard you might think. (Although some days will really be awful. If you are watching the weather you will be able to prepare.) Get good gloves, a coat, a base layer and warm shoes and you'll be fine!

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      #3
      I've always found that tracking in the snow into the house, car, etc. is a problem. Gets on your clothing, melts in the house, car. Try to stay in tracks in the snow on the street to lessen the exertion on you. Gloves get wet. Dress for the weather. Getting stuck is a potential problem. The beauty of a fresh fallen snow is a plus though. Good luck.
      I refuse to tip toe through life, only to arrive safely at death.

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        #4
        they got ski for your casters that look so kool

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          #5
          i when it's snowing hard will stay inside for a few days till it is all cleaned up. i hate the snow very hard to push in it
          T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

          Comment


            #6
            I think you will find a lot of people here who already live in snowy areas who are trying to find a way to move to areas with little or no snow, not the reverse. So many complain about being cold all winter long, even indoors, and navigating in the snow, either in a power or manual wheelchair can be a major challenge. In addition, cities and towns vary in snow clearance practices. A common complaint is not clearing snow from sidewalks and curb cuts, and also piling snow removed from the street into handicapped parking places. Tracking mud and slush into your home, business, and commercial establishments visited is also a common problem. Even finding cold weather clothing that works for people pushing their own wheelchairs can be problematic. You may want to reconsider moving from an area of lower snowfall unless there really is a pressing reason forcing you to do so.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              #7
              Snow is not the only problem. Ice is worse and there is always the possibility of frostbite if it is cold enough. Wheeling with a heavy coat on can be a real workout without snow. I came down to South Carolina from Pittsburgh to get away from the snow and cold. Sure, it gets hot here in the summer but you do not have to shovel the heat. lol I hope you got a good reason for going to the winter wonder land. If not, you will wonder how you got the idea. lol
              You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
              http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

              See my personal webpage @
              http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

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                #8
                Thank you so much for your advice!! Will definitely keep it in mind.

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                  #9
                  This is the coolest thing I've heard yet. In the south snow-white is almost a foreign thing lol. How difficult are the ski attachments to change because of going indoors/outdoors etc?

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                    #10
                    I find it really hard to get out and about in the hot humid weather we have down here. I am.not saying I want to go play in ten foot snow but preparing myself for that obstacle is what I'm researching right now because from about April to October I am flat out miserable here. I'm hot natured, everything outdoors from the top of the car getting in, to door handles, outdoor recreation... Anything like that is too hot to enjoy or use. Other than just my personal preference, so far the north is the only thing that has been appealing. I will take what you said into consideration. Thank you for replying.

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                      #11
                      I just can't get it out of my head. Ever since I was a little girl actually. I've got to try...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Domosoyo View Post
                        This is complicated, so I'll try to keep it simple by saying that your best friend is the forecast. If there is a chance of a lot of snow try to get your stuff done before it starts. Check the temp for the days you will be there. If above 25 degrees I would say that most roads, sidewalks etc should be clear of any ice or snow.

                        Bottom line, getting around is not going to be as hard you might think. (Although some days will really be awful. If you are watching the weather you will be able to prepare.) Get good gloves, a coat, a base layer and warm shoes and you'll be fine!
                        Your location shows both MN and AZ... do you split your time between the two or are you from one but relocated to another? Just wondering.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Southwestern Ontario Canada.

                          We haven't had bad snow for a couple of years. Winters have been mild. The only time it matters is if you're working and have to get out every day.

                          Otherwise, I enjoy the temperate seasons. Especially sitting at my window if I'm awake at 7am with a latte and watching all the people struggle to get to work (lol, I did it for 20+)

                          If you're not working, things are usually cleared out within a day or two sparing a storm of the century situation.
                          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                            Southwestern Ontario Canada.

                            We haven't had bad snow for a couple of years. Winters have been mild. The only time it matters is if you're working and have to get out every day.

                            Otherwise, I enjoy the temperate seasons. Especially sitting at my window if I'm awake at 7am with a latte and watching all the people struggle to get to work (lol, I did it for 20+)

                            If you're not working, things are usually cleared out within a day or two sparing a storm of the century situation.
                            I will probably have to work, but would hope for something I can do from home if need be. Or maybe, if I'm lucky, will find a boss that is empathetic enough to understand if I get Held up inside due to the weather. But that being said, we had a really bad ice storm a few years ago, people without power for two weeks or more, felled trees, really bad roads etc and I had to go somewhere (I can't remember now) but had to salt and roll, salt and roll to get from my parking space into my house. We don't usually have to winterize down here (plow, salt roads and sidewalks or whatever) so it was slick going. I just keep salt in my car, a freezer bag in my purse, and extra water, blankets, and warming break packs in my car when one hits.

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                              #15
                              You might want to look at coastal Washington and Oregon. Little snow, but cooler summers, and rain is much easier to handle in the winters than snow in a wheelchair.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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