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Mark Smith kicked off airplane

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    #46
    In 2009 my quadriplegic husband was kicked off of a Frontier/Lynx plane in Denver after the entire plane boarded. The only explanation was the pilot thought he was a hazard. We wanted an explanation and were told he would be forcibly removed. We insisted on a safe transfer down the bumpy steps to the tarmac and were left in the wind with prop on tiny aisle chair.It was all humiliating and scary as he had just been discharged from 3 months of rehab.
    A few hours later United flew us home with tickets bought by Frontier. They were so kind to us and even gave us vouchers to fly with them again. I've always remembered United being our heros and their pilots apologizing and being embarrassed for their industry. Apparently things have changed.

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      #47
      Oh Linda, my heart ached to read about what the two of you went through on Frontier. I am so glad that United made it right (to whatever extent they could) - and sorry that nowadays their standards seem to have sunk so low. ((((Linda))))
      MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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        #48
        "Linda T!"
        How are you and Dave? It is so very good to see you posting here!

        NL sends her best.

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          #49
          Originally posted by Tim C. View Post
          So what?
          You guys actually believe you're no different?
          Are we less than?
          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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            #50
            Rumor has it that a (Mark-measured) 32" high chair didn't want to fit in a 28" high B737 cargo bay door (per AA's website). And I'd say they didn't want it on its side with unknown batteries and such. Now another tape measure has Mark's chair at 29" inches, and someone writing letters at AA is saying their B737's are equipped with 33" tall doors. So...anyone's guess might work here, lol.

            Mark also states that an airport worker said the chair actually was in the plane at some point...but AA's letter in response to the accusation goes like this:

            "The aircraft's cargo door opening on this particular aircraft is 33" tall and 48" wide. While our ground staff tried on several occasions to load your wheelchair into the cargo hold they were, unfortunately, unsuccessful."

            and...

            "the option of traveling on your original flight with your wheelchair following on another flight, or that you could travel with your wheelchair on the next available flight that could accommodate your wheelchair. Our records show you opted to travel with your wheelchair and therefore deplaned with assistance from our ground staff."

            Clear as mud

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              #51
              With all the hullabaloo about deplaning seated passengers for any reason, I have my doubts we will every hear how this event gets settled. Mark will settle and we will never get a sniff of the result. If this ever happens to me I will resist and make them remove me while I loudly speak badly of their ancestors. Why NOT? Everyone from any Airline is going to lie about everything anyway. The Airline said he deplaned voluntarily sure he did ! And he sat in the jet way for a half hour voluntarily as well I suppose. Then a five hour wait for another flight.

              Well i don't happen to agree with Mark Smith about much, but he has the airline over a barrel I believe. He will settle for a nice price and shut his mouth about it. It would be nice to know if that plane left the airport with that seat empty. That would be very telling, if the plane was full before they booted Mark off!!!!

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                #52
                Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                The Eagle lift would replace the manual (human) "lifters" that some require to get from their own wheelchair to the aisle chair, and then from the aisle chair to their seat. I know a number of people who were dropped and injured during this process, including my mother. Would much prefer a safer device like this. Neither is great for your dignity, but at least you are safer.

                (KLD)
                My first Eagle Lift experience was an excellent one. YVR in Vancouver rolls both the aisle chair and the lift to the gate waiting area so you have a choice. Not so much in Honolulu. Both shoulders took a beating as "trained employees" didn't know how to do an aisle chair transfer.

                Crappler and others: This is a far superior, safe and dignified way to access an aircraft. We should all be advocating for our local airport to adopt safer systems.

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                  #53
                  Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
                  My first Eagle Lift experience was an excellent one. YVR in Vancouver rolls both the aisle chair and the lift to the gate waiting area so you have a choice. Not so much in Honolulu. Both shoulders took a beating as "trained employees" didn't know how to do an aisle chair transfer.

                  Crappler and others: This is a far superior, safe and dignified way to access an aircraft. We should all be advocating for our local airport to adopt safer systems.
                  Glad you had a great experience but for me a often as we fly I would much prefer airline ground crew to lift much faster, much less invasive.

                  On a side note...notice how you all never heard the follow up from Mark Smith?

                  It had nothing to do with a disability and more with simply a business practice of overbooking and bumping someone off a passenger that might have paid a lower flight cost.

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