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SNOW, how's that work with a manual chair?

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  • SNOW, how's that work with a manual chair?

    I realise this is an odd time if year for a question about snow, but I'm considering a move to a variety of rather snowy climes (detroit and Denver are on the list)

    I'm a rather busy person, and I will be working 60 to 80 hours a week, and I'm trying to figure out if I had better just stick to the warmer regions of the country like where I'm from.

    Do major cities keep sidewalks and whatnot clear in the winter time? How about driving, I'm sure that is feasible, but for those of you up north are you able to get it off the car most places you need to without slipping and sliding around.

    Guess I should have prefaced this with my stats: T8 complete with a tilite zra.

    Thanks for your advice.

  • #2
    Didn't you watch the news last winter? Haven't you heard how Detroit's bankruptcy decimated city services? I moved to South Carolina to get away from the snows in Pittsburgh. It gets hot here in the summer but you do not have to shovel the heat. lol
    Last edited by SCIfor55+yrs.; 06-25-2014, 11:57 AM.
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    • #3
      I live in Upstate NY i know where i live a majority of the sidewalks are maintained by the owners of the businesses or homes. I also know that if they are not maintained the city or village will fine you. Not sure how much but they will. I generally find however that i tend to stay home more during the winter. And just because its easier and i hate being cold anyway. But thats just me. And to answer your question about driving and getting it off your car, i have a telescoping snow brush works very well i can get a majority of the snow off with it and what i cannot reach just comes off as i drive. Roads generally are ok and i am generally home when it is really bad out anyways.
      T6 Incomplete due to a Spinal cord infarction July 2009

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      • #4
        Snow and wheelchairs do not play nice together. I now work from home, so I don't really care, but when I had to go in the office it was difficult. I'm in the middle of Iowa so the snow isn't as bad as Denver or Detroit. Roads are usually cleared although it can be messy when it is actually coming down. Parking lots are the killer.

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        • #5
          I too work from home to limit my time having to try and push through the snow that is not shoveled to my car. You can certainly do it...but I would not recommend it. We are looking to move to warmer climates too once I can recover enough money on our condo.
          "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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          • #6
            It can be done but it's frustrating as hell at times, remember often things don't get plowed or shoveled down to bare pavement at least where I live so you have to make sure you can wheel to where ever you want to go without getting stuck. Just because store owners are supposed to clean their sidewalks doesn't mean they will or will have them done when you need to go out. Where I used to live the plows used to have a habit of pushing the snow into the handicapped parking area. Plus if you're driving a car you're dragging in a wet sloppy wheelchair or parts there of. My last stint in snow country was 16 years and I'm glad I moved to a warmer climate.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by canuck View Post
              It can be done but it's frustrating as hell at times, remember often things don't get plowed or shoveled down to bare pavement at least where I live so you have to make sure you can wheel to where ever you want to go without getting stuck. Just because store owners are supposed to clean their sidewalks doesn't mean they will or will have them done when you need to go out. Where I used to live the plows used to have a habit of pushing the snow into the handicapped parking area. Plus if you're driving a car you're dragging in a wet sloppy wheelchair or parts there of.
              I agree with all of this.

              I like the snow, but it can definitely be a PITA at times. My biggest gripe is the difficulty of finding decent gloves that are easy to get on/off my quad paws. You won't have that issue. Driving in it isn't bad, but I drive an AWD car. Just go slow(er) and don't brake erratically.

              Also, for whatever it's worth, Michigan snow is generally wetter & heavier than Colorado snow.

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              • #8
                It completely depends upon the city. But in general, it is rough. You stay home a lot. And after the long winter we just had, it gets very depressing.

                I strongly recommend you move to a house with a connected garage or an apartment with indoor accessible parking, and find a job with indoor accessible connected parking as well. Or have a position where you can telecommute and assume it will hard to get out during winter. Actually, I wouldn't move to a house at all as you don't want to be responsible for your own shoveling!

                Interestingly, the downtown city streets near us are often kept fairly clean, but accessing parking meters can be impossible to reach in the snow. Parking lots can also be poorly cleared. It is the worst in the suburbs though, as you cannot rely upon people or small business to clean their walks. Combining snow with older sidewalks/streets and poorly angled curb cut outs... let's just say it is bad. And then there's the ice...... And of course, if it is snowing when you are going out/commuting, nothing will be cleaned well at that time.

                Now is not a good time to be moving to Detroit. Definitely recommend avoiding snow if you can. If you can't, go in with the attitude that you are trying it for a year, and then re-assess.

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                • #9
                  Agree with hlh if you move to snowier climate have an attached garage or apt with inside parking. We briefly lived in an apartment here in Michigan and the landlord shoveled the sidewalks but the parking lot became a rutted frozen mess as winter progressed. A FreeWheel would help a lot. Inside Detroit side streets are not plowed for weeks at a time, sidewalks never done unless residents take responsibility. If you live in a snowy area locate in suburbia where you will likely work in a mall like setting with good plowing service as opposed to living and working in a city. This last winter our attached garage was a wonderful lifesaver, we made our snow plowing guy a fortune.

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                  • #10
                    I'm a dread walker but spent a few years off and on in a wheelchair since my injury during major spinal overhauls. others have a better answer but there can be a fun side ...I was in Chicago and it was howling down snow about 12 - 14 inches when I left a meeting. I misjudged the access at the corner as it was late and mostly unshoveled sidewalks. I went off a pretty high curb and faceplanted into the street and a stoner rushed up to me and said dude what will you do. I said when the next plow came by it would push me back up and he said something like whoa dude that is so cool, while some normal folks asked how to help me and got my chair up and me in it and got me the few blocks to my hotel. I will never forget that. net I think snow and wheels suck as a combination. Course the way I "walk" I faceplant in the snow regularly anyway

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                    • #11
                      Let me get this right.. You have a choice where to move and you're thinking a place where there's snow? Dang, no way for me. Pacific Northwest is about as cold and sometimes snowy as I can tolerate.

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                      • #12
                        It does snow in Denver some but it melts quickly. Basically, Denver is high desert and only receives from 8 to 15 inches of precipitation a year. The only time it's not sunny is when it is actually raining or snowing. Even in Jan and Feb the average high is about 50 degrees.
                        C 5/6 Comp.
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                        • #13
                          Snow sucks. The worst is the wet kind, below 25F or so it isn't as bad. 0F is pretty good actually, but then it's f-in cold out, lol. After the last winter we had, I think you would be out of your mind to move to a snowy area. But if you must, garage and preferably a garage at work also are a big plus. Not sure how you would do it otherwise, but I'm a sissy

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                          • #14
                            From the GWN - ok just as far north as Toronto - the City clears the white stuff fast from areas it is responsible for, (save for Rob Ford's white stuff), but most sidewalks, parking lots, etc., are wet enough to make pushrims slick. And it's freekin' freezing.

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                            • #15
                              Simple it doesn't, nor do electric chairs. Just hope you don't have much, and that there're is good plows for the roads and sidewalks or else your trapped.

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