Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SNOW, how's that work with a manual chair?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Anything is possible.

    Where you live and where you work are the two important factors, other locations should be more flexible as to when you need to go there.

    - Where I live the sidewalks downtown are usually cleared well, a lot even while it is snowing, unless it is a major snowstorm.

    - Driving is the least of your worries (unless the car breaksdown or you slide into the ditch). Other than downtown, not all sidewalks are cleared, or cleared wide enough, or cleared in a timely matter, or are not cleared until after the snow is packed down and it creates a hard, slick, bumpy surface.

    - I have not lived in either Detroit or Denver, but I think the snow in Denver does not last. It snows, the sun is out the next day, and the snow melts and is mostly gone in a day or two (anyone from Denver want to chime in??). I think Detroit would be for a masochist considering ALL their problems beyond snow.

    - Melting snow creates slush, which is often loaded with salt, wherever you go, you WILL be bringing that in with you, your house, work, business, car etc. This can cause your car to rust out from the INSIDE out. Wheelschairs pick up a LOT of snow, way more than a set of shoes, and I mean WAY more.

    - I consider an attached garage almost a must. An attached garage would also allow you to have an 'inside chair' which would not be tracking in a bunch of $h!t and get rid of the necessity of loading and unloading your chair when leaving and arriving at home.

    - If you are thinking of using public transportation, see my comments about sidewalks above. Now add to that bus stops and curb cuts and crosswalks. The curb cuts and crosswalks may get cleared once, or even twice, but then the snowplow comes along and fills them with snow again. Oh, and curb cuts are often the lowest point, so that is where melted dirty salt laden snow ends up. Bus stops/shelters, big hit and miss.

    - On street parking, don't even think about it.

    - Getting snow off of the vehicle, not so hard. Having remote start would be very helpful. Snow brushes with long handles are easy to find.

    - Handicapped parking, can be covered with snow or used as snow storage area, also more abuse of these spots in winter.

    - How do you handle cold? Do you like temps in the 60's, 70's, or 80's? I would recommend wool long underwear. Cabelas, Lands End, or LL Bean is your best bet.

    - Do you have the option to telecommute? Being able to stay at home after a major snowfall could simplify things a lot.

    After all that I have said, I have lived in MN a long time and even parked outside in an apartment parking lot for quite a few years. But I have also missed numerous events because of snow.
    Last edited by Joe-MN; 06-26-2014, 12:30 AM.
    Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

    Comment


    • #17
      Having lived for 35 years in one of the coldest states in the nation the last 12 in a chair. I for one am looking forward to spending my winters in a place where someone asks me what the snowshovel tied to the top of my car is for. As others have said snow and wheelchairs really dont mix well two inches might as well be two feet.

      Comment


      • #18
        Things are not cleared off automatically and sometimes the streets and sidewalks are clear but the cut-outs in many cases are too narrow for a chair to go through. If you really have to move to snow-filled cimate........I agree with the above.....underground parking in a condo or an attached garage to a house with a ramp in the garage if it is needed to enter the home.

        Driving on snow or ice requires the same amount of care as one would if AB. Finding parking for a transfer to your chair could be interesting some days. Afternoon thaw and an overnight refreeze creates big frozen ruts of wonder that are hard to push over.

        There is so much to consider it makes me pause to ask if you have ever lived in a cold climate?

        Comment


        • #19
          Snow is really tough. Even if you can operate the chair well, snow builds on both the rear and front tires. Once that happens, traction really goes down. I weigh 175 and once snow gets on tires it is horrible. And this is using knobby tires. If you have wide front tires, they will act like snow plow. It can be done, but it is tough. You also can even get yourself stuck.

          Comment


          • #20
            I have a TiLite ZRA also and I am a big fan of snow skiing so I am rolling through snow every winter. It is tricky and using mt bike tires does help with traction. Another factor to keep in mind is it is also hard on the chair specifically the front wheel bearings. I usually ruin a set each winter.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Domosoyo View Post
              There is so much to consider it makes me pause to ask if you have ever lived in a cold climate?
              Nope, never. I've only lived in the sunny south, which is why I ask.

              Cold doesn't worry me, it's getting about that I'm concerned with. I would be working at a hospital, which I assume most in snowy climates will have a good parking deck that they keep cleared. Sounds like some kind of garage would be pretty much a necessity.

              The consensus seems to be snow and a chair is difficult/miserable.... Anybody have a different opinion?

              Thanks everyone for helping guide an ignorant southerner, sounds like yall got it rough up north. If I do wind up applying for positions, I would be interviewing in December, so that ought to give me a pretty good taste of whether or not I can hack it.

              Comment


              • #22
                I couldn't have picked a better winter to stop working - last winter was B-R-U-T-A-L.

                They just cut off water to 150,000 residents of Detroit who have filed a complaint with the UN. Might want to avoid that area until the dust settles ... but real estate is cheap right now! Don't depend on government services such as snow removal though .. and they have laid off many government workers including police and fire.
                Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                Comment


                • #23
                  Life in a chair in snow country is difficult, it is not miserable. I wrote what I wrote earlier so you would know what to expect. Especially note my comment about missing events/occasions. I think Denver would be very nice, especially if you like the outdoors. I have even thought (ok, daydreamed) of moving to Detroit, simply because all the problems they have could/can be turned into opportunities if you want to get creative and not follow the conventional path. If you get a job offer in Detroit, get on Google Earth and look where there are houses with neat lawns and where there are not, some great houses at low prices me thinks.
                  Better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Detroit is having a lot of problems just delivering basic services. If you lived on a nice side street in Detroit and there was a big snow storm you could expect no plowing for a week or so. The main streets would be plowed and opened but side streets would remain one set of rutted tracks allowing only one way driving. If you dug your car out the shoveled space would be immediately occupied by another car as soon as you left. Even downtown you could not expect curb cuts to be shoveled and clear.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by funklab View Post
                      Nope, never. I've only lived in the sunny south, which is why I ask.

                      Cold doesn't worry me, it's getting about that I'm concerned with. I would be working at a hospital, which I assume most in snowy climates will have a good parking deck that they keep cleared. Sounds like some kind of garage would be pretty much a necessity.

                      The consensus seems to be snow and a chair is difficult/miserable.... Anybody have a different opinion?

                      Thanks everyone for helping guide an ignorant southerner, sounds like yall got it rough up north. If I do wind up applying for positions, I would be interviewing in December, so that ought to give me a pretty good taste of whether or not I can hack it.
                      If you decide on one of the jobs you can always come back here for more help! Yeah, of the two I would have to go with Denver too. They get a lot of snow but the melt time leading to dry sidewalks and roads is much much faster than in Detroit.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X