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Amy Van Dyken: former Olympian suffered spinal injury.

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    #31
    Yup, every morning when I wake up and see the wheelchair next to me I think of the all fun I'm going to have!

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      #32
      it was an interesting news piece. My take after watching the CBS story is, I think she is still in the Denial phase of grief. In the Denial stage the defense mechanism is to try to deny the reality of the situation and subdue or rationalize the overwhelming emotions. In her case the defense mechanism is going full on Super Happy Fun Time. It is going to take her some time to grieve. I know in my case, it took a year at least to get thru all 5 stages of grief

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        #33
        Originally posted by lisamae4 View Post
        Did anyone see the CBS story they did on Amy this morning? I think it is great that she has a positive attitude, but saying it is fun being in a wheelchair that is taking it a little to far in my book.
        It certainly is not a condition that one should strive for but I used a wheelchair to get around for close to 30 years and have a great deal of fun in it.

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          #34
          Originally posted by Rustyjames View Post
          Yup, every morning when I wake up and see the wheelchair next to me I think of the all fun I'm going to have!
          Love the sarcasm

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            #35
            "I am not sure anyone with a new SCI, celebrity or not, "accepts" their SCI, especially this early. I think "acceptance" is a concept developed by health care providers that makes them feel superior to and parental over the patient. I hear ICU staff very glib in their judgement that the patient hasn't yet "accepted" their injury (is maintaining hope) and I always want to say to them "I bet YOU wouldn't be "accepting it" either if you were in their place"!

            Even full understanding of the significance of the injury, and its permanence (at least for now) is something that comes only after you have gone home from rehab and starting learning to live life within the limitations of your individual impairment. Emotionally dealing with this, learning to cope, and adjust your life is what needs to occur, and this takes a good amount of time...for many at least 2-5 years.

            (KLD)"


            Well said.
            Last edited by tarheelandy; 16 Jul 2014, 10:45 AM.

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              #36
              I don't believe you have to accept it ever and I have been injured 34 years. When they preached that to me many years ago I think like KLD said it's for them. That being said I live a good life from my chair and it beats the alternative (death). I would always tell them "I might have to live with it but I never have to accept it". I busted my hump for the first 10 years 6-8 hours a day, estiming, weight training, standing, simulated walking, arm cycle, passive leg bike, acupuncture, message, nutrition. You name it I tried it from 1980 to 1990 then I went on with life. I still try to eat right and I do a modified 1 to 2 hour or so workout 5 days a week and stretch every day but I am not chasing a cure any more.

              At some point life must go on or it will pass you by.
              ^^(A)^^

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                #37
                I agree with darty. i'm 28 yrs next week, never have accepted it, if I accept it then SCI wins........i'll always have hope
                Bike-on.com rep
                John@bike-on.com
                c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                sponsored handcycle racer

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                  #38
                  Amy has been discharged. To read or watch the latest video, click here.
                  The test of success is not what you do when you are on top. Success is how high you bounce when you hit the bottom
                  --General George Patton

                  Complex problems need to be solved collectively.
                  ––Paul Nussbaum
                  usc87.blogspot.com

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                    #39
                    Today Amy van Dyken was on the news walking around with a robotic exoskeleton. The news was treating it like it was a big milestone

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                      #40
                      Here's a video and article done by People a couple days ago for those that are following Amy's progress. LINK
                      http://spinalcordresearchandadvocacy.wordpress.com/

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                        #41
                        It's great to see her progress, but dear gawd the misinformation.

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                          #42
                          yes acceptance is a process and sometimes I am OK with being paralyzed because it has made me who I am but at other times life as an SCI sucks. The celebrity Olympic swimmer is probably getting used to her SCI and the problems that go with it but don't forget she was the worlds best at something, swimming so I am going to assume she has some positive skills for dealing with the cards she was delt. Either way she has turned the focus back on us SCI for a second. Maybe with her star power she will continue to.

                          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                          I am not sure anyone with a new SCI, celebrity or not, "accepts" their SCI, especially this early. I think "acceptance" is a concept developed by health care providers that makes them feel superior to and parental over the patient. I hear ICU staff very glib in their judgement that the patient hasn't yet "accepted" their injury (is maintaining hope) and I always want to say to them "I bet YOU wouldn't be "accepting it" either if you were in their place"!

                          Even full understanding of the significance of the injury, and its permanence (at least for now) is something that comes only after you have gone home from rehab and starting learning to live life within the limitations of your individual impairment. Emotionally dealing with this, learning to cope, and adjust your life is what needs to occur, and this takes a good amount of time...for many at least 2-5 years.

                          (KLD)

                          Comment


                            #43
                            [QUOTE=backwoodsrider;1767858]yes acceptance is a process and sometimes I am OK with being paralyzed because it has made me who I am......"
                            Nothing personal BackW. I'm not picking on you, it's hypocritical::
                            How does anyone say they're ok with sci?
                            Sorry, I hope that only means you're accepted your SCI cause you've got no fucking choice. Btw, of course it made you you. Who else could it make you?

                            Comment


                              #44
                              [QUOTE=Tim C.;1768202]
                              Originally posted by backwoodsrider View Post
                              yes acceptance is a process and sometimes I am OK with being paralyzed because it has made me who I am......"
                              Nothing personal BackW. I'm not picking on you, it's hypocritical::
                              How does anyone say they're ok with sci?
                              Sorry, I hope that only means you're accepted your SCI cause you've got no fucking choice. Btw, of course it made you you. Who else could it make you?
                              Sometimes I am grounded and happy and see how being paralyzed has given me some gifts about being a more tolerant and non judgemental man and I like what has happened to me because I am SCI.

                              However other times I am not OK with being paralyzed and angry at my situation and just wish I could have a life like I see all the ABs have got.

                              I try and plan things out during the day so that I might see life from the good balanced viewpoint but really every day its a crap shoot and I just show up.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                i can still walk, with a afo, yet the complications of my injury have robbed me of so much in life. The bowel problems have made me a hermit , the pain have complicated matters worse, She has a good group of people behind her that is helping a lot..
                                i have no one, so this makes it way more difficult trying to find groups or ways to socialize to meet people is very discouraging.
                                tldr/ amy has a very good family and support group , plus access to the best medical, that makes a huge difference
                                cauda equina

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