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  • #46
    Was talking about her husband. We were discussing before about when to apply for a Green card for him (ASAP....), and I had thought a Green card alone would qualify him for full ACA coverage, but it does not. Full ACA coverage with subsidies is only for citizens and permanent residents/green card holders here at least 5 years.

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    • #47
      @ancientgimp, I realise the US is not what I remember or envision, but I also know that I need to weigh it all up based on our situation. Here are some thoughts if you are interested:

      ACA: I just don't think that is going to happen at this point without major backlash, especially in the more socially liberal states, which are the only we are considering. Where I live now they are rolling back on many previous promises, and I "think" the situation will be similar here in not too many years, after paying a huge amount of taxes and not having time to save a good nest-egg to deal with it.

      Minorities being scapegoated: It has been happening here since the early 2000's. It's a small country, so people may not be so aware of it in other countries, but it causes me daily problems. Xenophobia is rife, and and strong signs of fascism are gripping Europe once again. I'll take my chances as a US citizen with a Europen partner in the US, because I see the other option here much worse. My partner feels the same way, because he has always been treated better in the US than I have been here -- a lot of that I blame G.W. Bush for. Google "Geert Wilders" if you are curious.

      Cops acting with impunity: Although I do not fear that the cops will shoot me here, they have already caused me physical bodily harm, which I believe was completely because I was not Dutch. Although they later apologised, they did nothing to compensate me, and the police agent was never reprimanded. In our most recent situation where someone stole a significant amount of money from my husband 3 weeks ago, after incapacitating him with a drug overdose, there are no signs that the police have or will take any action. There is very little accountability for any government services, including medical care and negligence, and we have been the victims of it too many times.

      Women's health: I will not consider living in a state that is fundamental religiously driven. I lived in Chicago and Boston for many years and overall felt less sexism even back then than I do now. The Netherlands is very far behind in women holding positions of power, except in a few instances like legal and healthcare. For the rest, it is an old boys network. Granted, that is not health care, but the impact it has on my daily life and earning capability is stifling.

      Money dominating politics: It happens here also, but just on a lesser scale, but relatively equally pervasive and getting worse. It is only recently that parties even need to declare where their funding comes from, and it's clear that it is not transparent.

      Guns are objects of worship: Probably my biggest concern in moving back to the US is the gun and violence culture. For that, I really do believe that Europe has it right, and I will miss that sense of security and not looking over my back all the time. This is something I just can't understand the average American wanting to put up with, and is a constant source of confusion for me. I guess we'll just have to take our chances on that...
      Last edited by elarson; 10-08-2014, 06:04 PM.
      Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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      • #48
        Thanks for all of your input @hlh.

        Everything I am reading is that my husband will be able to purchase marketplace health insurance and receive tax credits without a waiting period, as long as he is a lawful permanent resident (LPR/Green Card holder) and we are married and filing jointly and fit the income requirements. He would be eligible for Medicaid after 5 years, or 3 years if he applies for naturalization, based on being married to a U.S. citizen. He probably would not be eligible for Medicaid due to his long-term disability benefits he receives until he is 65 years old through a reciprocal social security treaty with the Netherlands. After 65 years old I am not sure exactly how it works. From what I am reading about Medicare eligibility, if either an individual or their spouse worked for ten or more years and paid money into the system, then we both are covered in the same way with similar costs. Now to figure out pensions...

        About some of the other places people have mentioned, places like California and Hawaii would be on the list, except for the high cost of living. New England would also be on the list, despite the cost of living, but the weather is pretty harsh. About the south east (North Carolina or Atlanta), I really don't see us fitting in, even if there are "pockets" of social liberalism. In general, I have ruled out any state that did not do Medicaid expansion, because in my view it pretty much speaks for itself for what their priorities are for their citizens well being. We are still considering the UK, but they are also going through fairly drastic austerity measures, and I as a US citizen as the primary breadwinner will have challenges there. Had we not been hit with disability, we would be considering more options....

        Originally posted by hlh View Post
        I wanted to clarify something I learned about today...
        Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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        • #49
          I went over your list on the first page and still think that Oregon (Portland area) meets all of your requirements. The only drawback is the rain, but today the weather is 77 degrees and sunny. You can get used to the rain and you don't have to shovel it like you do snow.
          Certain areas of Portland are somewhat sketchy, but it is easy to avoid them Yamhill county is the cheapest place for property tax in the Portland area, and you can find country property within a half hour of downtown Portland. You are between the mountains and the sea. There are numerous activities that will give you opportunities for outdoor recreation and fun. Most of the state is rural in character. Stay away from the cities outside of the Portland area as there are still employment issues. Lack of jobs. I live in Eugene and there is a pall of unemployment over the city.

          Public transportation in the surrounding Portland are and in Portland are excellent. Some areas in Portland can be expensive, but a little research can get you a place to be.
          Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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          • #50
            Thanks for your input skippy13. I'm just curious, are there any coastal area's that are reasonable for property tax, and near at least a somewhat decent medical center? We are not looking for the beach life, but are both sailors and looking to be near the water if at all possible.

            Originally posted by skippy13 View Post
            I went over your list on the first page and still think that Oregon (Portland area) meets all of your requirements. The only drawback is the rain, but today the weather is 77 degrees and sunny. You can get used to the rain and you don't have to shovel it like you do snow.
            Certain areas of Portland are somewhat sketchy, but it is easy to avoid them Yamhill county is the cheapest place for property tax in the Portland area, and you can find country property within a half hour of downtown Portland. You are between the mountains and the sea. There are numerous activities that will give you opportunities for outdoor recreation and fun. Most of the state is rural in character. Stay away from the cities outside of the Portland area as there are still employment issues. Lack of jobs. I live in Eugene and there is a pall of unemployment over the city.

            Public transportation in the surrounding Portland are and in Portland are excellent. Some areas in Portland can be expensive, but a little research can get you a place to be.
            Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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            • #51
              The Columbia river that forms the border between Washington state and Oregon is one of the best places to sail because of the high force winds that come down the Columbia river gorge. It also brings with it snow and ice in the northern parts of the city in the winter. The Columbia river gorge is one of the most beautiful sights in the world in my opinion. Houseboats are another option. Many are on the Columbia river. Google earth and follow along the river to see if it would appeal to you.

              Sailing and sailboarding are popular hobbies on the Columbia. Look up The Dalles Oregon on the internet and you will see what I mean.

              Coastal cities are not really very good places to live. High unemployment and not very smart people (it is remarkably noticeable that education is grossly lacking there) for the most part. Sorry to all the people who live on the Oregon coast, but it is really my opinion.

              You would have to go to Portland for most specialized medical treatment. Yamhill county and Clackamas counties (Washington and Multnomah have some of the highest) have the cheapest property taxes and they are located near OHSU (Oregon Health Sciences University) which is a very good hospital. About 30 miles as the crow flies.

              There is light rail and lots of buses for transportation. Handicapped transport is also easy to arrange.
              Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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              • #52
                I agree that you want to be in reasonable driving distance to OHSU.

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                • #53
                  Thanks skippy13 and hlh,

                  This is all very daunting, and even as an American citizen I am scared shitless. That does not even begin to compare with what my husband, as a Dutch native dependent on me feels. We went to a social worker today to talk about his options if he stays here or if he leaves. It's all very scary to say the least. The good news is that if I get hit by a bus, he will probably have his security back home....
                  Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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                  • #54
                    Ellen, I want to respond, and I don't want to sound like a salesman for the Seattle and surrounds, but so much of what you seek seem to be available right here or very close by including sailing fresh or salt water. Seattle and neighboring cities share 30 mile long Lake Washington which is connected to the salt water by locks. There are boating possibilities everywhere. What are your top three must haves? You say medical, but what does that mean? There is no problem as far as quality of health care facilities here.
                    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                    • #55
                      I haven't gotten far enough to know this yet, but it's a good question. About medical, I think as long as we are within driving distance of a major medical center we would be fine.
                      Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                      ...What are your top three must haves? You say medical, but what does that mean? There is no problem as far as quality of health care facilities here.
                      Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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                      • #56
                        Just some added thoughts: is proximity to family a consideration? Also, what about a 'transitional' type of move where you have a temporary favored location from which you can consider alternatives. In other words, view the move in terms of 'might not be permanent'. Some folks do this when job dictates a move; they can put a bunch of belongings into a storage facility while scouting around. There are storage places all over now. I once did something similar when we moved from a big city - thankfully my sister let me ship a truckload of belongings to be stored in her garage. We landed a barrier free tiny apartment and began a search which took one year, then got our "stuff" back. We are now decades in our location.

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                        • #57
                          I second this .... probably, mainly because I want you to live near me! We are in Raleigh-Durham.

                          Originally posted by triumph View Post
                          My husband and I are both wheelers and lived in North Carolina for two years, in the mid 1970's. At that time we were surprised at the great accessibility. We were first renting an apartment in Raleigh (very nice unit that had month to month rental option). Drove around Durham and very impressed with access. The state of NC had a fantastic activist wheeler couple - the late Ron Mace and his wife -sorry I can't recall her first name. He was an architect and barrier free design expert. They made the whole state wake up to barrier free design. (You can google them).
                          My husband found a job, but alas, it was south of Raleigh/Durham, in a much quieter/conservative area. Great job but hard to connect with community and we left after two years as I could not find employment and missed my big family up North.
                          It would be nice if you could travel to some of your potential locations and spend a few days scouting. This would be one area that might have promise.
                          Wife of Chad (C4/5 since 1988), mom of a great teenager

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