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  • Roller coasters

    For those that have ridden roller coasters since becoming injured, do you strap your legs together with some sort of Velcro strap? Or do you just let them dangle?

  • #2
    I just let them dangle. I am not on the ride that long to really worry about it and they really do not flop around much.
    "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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    • #3
      With the luck I have I can just picture my legs twisting and snapping lol

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      • #4
        When you get the leg problem figured out try this baby!


        You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
        http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

        See my personal webpage @
        http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

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        • #5
          What do they (park staff) do with your chair? I can't figure that part out. Funny this thread just came up, I have been thinking about going on a rollercoaster. Not SCI but I haven't been on a rollercoaster since I started using a chair (17 years).

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          • #6
            Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
            When you get the leg problem figured out try this baby!


            Looks amazing! But I don't think I'd try any roller coasters that only have a lap bar I wouldn't feel very secure. I'd only go on the ones that have the restraints that come down over your shoulders.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by grommet View Post
              What do they (park staff) do with your chair? I can't figure that part out. Funny this thread just came up, I have been thinking about going on a rollercoaster. Not SCI but I haven't been on a rollercoaster since I started using a chair (17 years).
              That's a good question I would suppose they just move it to the side until you're done with the ride.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SequinScandal View Post
                That's a good question I would suppose they just move it to the side until you're done with the ride.
                Eek, I worry that you may be right. My chair is $5,000 out of pocket and is my lifeline, plus my personal items I'd leave with the chair. I'd worry about a highschool kid telling me they'll look out for my chair. Maybe there's a shift change or maybe some other people think it would be funny to say my chair is theirs and roll off with it. I contacted Great America, our local park, and asked about what their procedure is. Have to wait and see what they say.

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                • #9
                  When I rode roller coasters at Six Flags & Disney I was always boarded from the exit platform. Then your chair is already on the exit side. The ride operators just move it to the side. I've never had any issues with someone taking off or messing with the chair.

                  Only rode a coaster once where legs dangled below seats. I had more of an issue with my head bobbling side-to-side with all the loops. When I rode the milder coasters at Disney, a friend helped me stay up right by either arm around my shoulders or in front of my shoulders to help brace me.

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                  • #10
                    The old wooden roller coasters are very bumpy. I'm not a big roller coaster fan, but I have taken a bunch of rides on The Great Bear at Hersheypark, PA. The seats have the over-the-shoulder restraint and your legs are dangling. Not a big deal.

                    stephen@bike-on.com

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                    • #11
                      I used to be a huge roller coaster fan before my injury and was looking to go again last summer. Thankfully I looked into their ride policy beforehand. I was looking at going to Cedar Point, which also owns King's Dominion/Island and their policy is unless you have complete control of one leg, they will not let you on the ride. For the bigger or more extreme rides, you must have control of both legs. Be careful to find out the policy of the park you want to go to because I would have ended up paying $60 to sit around and not be allowed to ride all day. Remember that just because a ride has wheelchair access, it doesn't mean a para or quad would be allowed to ride it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by sledgrl View Post
                        When I rode roller coasters at Six Flags & Disney I was always boarded from the exit platform. Then your chair is already on the exit side. The ride operators just move it to the side. I've never had any issues with someone taking off or messing with the chair.

                        Only rode a coaster once where legs dangled below seats. I had more of an issue with my head bobbling side-to-side with all the loops. When I rode the milder coasters at Disney, a friend helped me stay up right by either arm around my shoulders or in front of my shoulders to help brace me.
                        Thank you for that information it really helped me understand what to expect. It makes sense to be boarded there and then a few minutes later arrive back at your chair. That makes it pretty easy.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ToastGuard View Post
                          I used to be a huge roller coaster fan before my injury and was looking to go again last summer. Thankfully I looked into their ride policy beforehand. I was looking at going to Cedar Point, which also owns King's Dominion/Island and their policy is unless you have complete control of one leg, they will not let you on the ride. For the bigger or more extreme rides, you must have control of both legs. Be careful to find out the policy of the park you want to go to because I would have ended up paying $60 to sit around and not be allowed to ride all day. Remember that just because a ride has wheelchair access, it doesn't mean a para or quad would be allowed to ride it.
                          That's good to know. How do they measure your control of a leg or both legs? I can stand, walk and even lift things (no SCI) but I can't do much for very long. If I were on a ride I would need to keep myself stable with my upper body.

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                          • #14
                            I am never honest with park staff about my injury. Any Cedar Fair-owned park will ask you questions and then rate you based on your abilities. They'll then give you a sheet of paper that tells the ride operators which rides you're allowed to go on. The operators will not let you on a ride if you're not 'approved' for it. I always tell them I have a little leg function even though I don't because my arms are strong enough to brace myself in almost any situation. I am confident doing this because I used to go on every ride at my local park but once Cedar Fair bought it I was prohibited from going on rides I had been on previously without issue. So I stopped being honest with them.

                            That being said, if you you're not strong enough to hold on to the ride as its pulling 4g while going 95mph you should NOT go on those rides. You WILL be injured. There have been times my arm and hand strength has been tested and I've been scared of falling out. You have to remember, an AB person isn't just holding on with their hands, their whole body is engaged to keep them in their seat. And on top of that, our legs and hips may be smaller and thinner and have a greater chance of sliding out from under the safety bar.

                            If you don't exercise regularly and can't do more than one pull-up, do not lie to the park staff about your abilities.


                            Most of the time you will get a special pass that allows you to go through the exit and bring up to 3 friends with you. You will be next in line even if the ride has an hour-long wait. You can also have your choice of seats on the ride. You can transfer in or have your friends lift you. Your chair will be placed in a safe area by the ride operators and often you'll be able to see it from the ride so you can keep an eye on it. But usually there's only one staff on the exit platform so if anything happens to it you know who's responsible. I've left my wallet, cell phone, etc in my chair and nothing has ever happened. No one wants to get fired.

                            I have been on many rides where my feet hung loose and have never had a problem. You would have to endure a tremendous amount of lateral force to rip a tendon or ligament. Crude internet research shows that it takes about 1800-2000 newtons to tear an ACL, which is a lot. A ride that could generate enough force to seriously injure people would not be allowed to be built.

                            I haven't been to Cedar Point, but I have been to Disneys Land and World as well as Universal Studios and Islands of Adventure. Roller coasters are awesome. Go for it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by brian View Post
                              I am never honest with park staff about my injury. Any Cedar Fair-owned park will ask you questions and then rate you based on your abilities. They'll then give you a sheet of paper that tells the ride operators which rides you're allowed to go on. The operators will not let you on a ride if you're not 'approved' for it. I always tell them I have a little leg function even though I don't because my arms are strong enough to brace myself in almost any situation. I am confident doing this because I used to go on every ride at my local park but once Cedar Fair bought it I was prohibited from going on rides I had been on previously without issue. So I stopped being honest with them.

                              That being said, if you you're not strong enough to hold on to the ride as its pulling 4g while going 95mph you should NOT go on those rides. You WILL be injured. There have been times my arm and hand strength has been tested and I've been scared of falling out. You have to remember, an AB person isn't just holding on with their hands, their whole body is engaged to keep them in their seat. And on top of that, our legs and hips may be smaller and thinner and have a greater chance of sliding out from under the safety bar.

                              If you don't exercise regularly and can't do more than one pull-up, do not lie to the park staff about your abilities.


                              Most of the time you will get a special pass that allows you to go through the exit and bring up to 3 friends with you. You will be next in line even if the ride has an hour-long wait. You can also have your choice of seats on the ride. You can transfer in or have your friends lift you. Your chair will be placed in a safe area by the ride operators and often you'll be able to see it from the ride so you can keep an eye on it. But usually there's only one staff on the exit platform so if anything happens to it you know who's responsible. I've left my wallet, cell phone, etc in my chair and nothing has ever happened. No one wants to get fired.

                              I have been on many rides where my feet hung loose and have never had a problem. You would have to endure a tremendous amount of lateral force to rip a tendon or ligament. Crude internet research shows that it takes about 1800-2000 newtons to tear an ACL, which is a lot. A ride that could generate enough force to seriously injure people would not be allowed to be built.

                              I haven't been to Cedar Point, but I have been to Disneys Land and World as well as Universal Studios and Islands of Adventure. Roller coasters are awesome. Go for it.
                              Thanks for the good info. Having other people make decisions about your disability is frustrating and sometimes ends up being unfair. On the other hand I thought you said some good things about knowing yourself what you can and can't do. Sometimes I don't know until I try something but when that happens I make the decision beforehand that it's on me.

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