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    AARP and age discrimination limits

    Recently I noticed that the age for joining AARP is 50. Wasn't it 55 not long ago?

    I also noticed on some job applications recently that age discrimination disclaimers now read 40 & over whereas before I don't recall explicit ages listed but I think the implied ages were 50-55. Does anyone know how they came up with age 40?

    In the first situation it is probably the AARP wanting to increase it's base. In the second it is probably just evidence of a tight job market.

    Anyway, I thought life expectancies and productivity at older ages were increasing. I guess this is just more evidence of a major demand problem.

    #2
    Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
    Recently I noticed that the age for joining AARP is 50. Wasn't it 55 not long ago?

    I also noticed on some job applications recently that age discrimination disclaimers now read 40 & over whereas before I don't recall explicit ages listed but I think the implied ages were 50-55. Does anyone know how they came up with age 40?

    In the first situation it is probably the AARP wanting to increase it's base. In the second it is probably just evidence of a tight job market.

    Anyway, I thought life expectancies and productivity at older ages were increasing. I guess this is just more evidence of a major demand problem.
    AARP minimum age for membership has been 50 for as long as I can remember.

    I think that the age of 40 is based on statistical analysis of complaints and workforce data..

    Last I heard, the longevity of Americans had recently shown no increase. Worker productivity has increased, but I'm unaware of how that is broken out across age ranges. FWIW, I expect worker productivity to peak soon. This is entirely anecdotal - but downsizing has led to workers doing more with less. Based on the number of complaints I hear from workers doing double-duty to absorb the effect of "downsizing", I don't think the higher output is sustainable. There may be other ways to increase productivity, but I think that human effort may be maxed out. Capital investments, training, system redesign . . . whatever. I just don't think that there's much more left to squeeze out of the workforce as a whole.
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

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      #3
      Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
      Recently I noticed that the age for joining AARP is 50. Wasn't it 55 not long ago?

      I also noticed on some job applications recently that age discrimination disclaimers now read 40 & over whereas before I don't recall explicit ages listed but I think the implied ages were 50-55. Does anyone know how they came up with age 40?

      In the first situation it is probably the AARP wanting to increase it's base. In the second it is probably just evidence of a tight job market.

      Anyway, I thought life expectancies and productivity at older ages were increasing. I guess this is just more evidence of a major demand problem.
      AARP age has been 50 for as long as I can remember...over 10 years.

      I am pretty sure that 40 has been the age discrimination trigger date from the beginning. I think it was meant to address corporate America's inclination to fire people in middle age to lower health, pension and salary costs.
      2012 SCINetUSA Clinical Trial Support Squad Member
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        #4
        Thanks for the confirmations and insight.

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