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New reality TV show PUSH GIRLS on SUNDANCE

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    #16
    Does anyone else use that technique for getting in and out of the bath??

    IMHO
    At first I thought it was really annoying, but..
    If they make the show too realistic and really show how much fun and delightful the SCI lifestyle is, NO AB will be interested in watching it and the show will be closed down. After thinking about it I think they have gone for a pretty good balance, sexing it up, making it over dramatic, MTV editing sound bites to keep the peeps interested. Yet still managing to show some of the things that effect someone with SCI, without boring the pants off of the AB's. The ladies overall are pretty brave and I take my hat off to them for working it. It would be good if they could introduce some more wheelchair characters as the program progresses, to really show how different each individuals SCI is and how different everyone's situation is. As with any of these real life type shows, some of the characters have to be really annoying, it kind of goes with the territory,
    so the character that is being really annoying is scoring high on the annoyance scale and definitely got under my skin.(blonde mustang driver)
    Hopefully it'll keep going.

    Maybe because I am always so frustrated, I could really relate to this.

    http://www.hulu.com/watch/365467/pus...ing#s-p1-sr-i1

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
      Thanks, I just watched the show. I wouldn't have thought to look on Hulu.

      Wow, lots of thoughts and feelings. First, I wish it was a bunch of guy wheelers - I'd have more to relate to. It's an awkward watch. I like the parts that are just about them being people who use chairs, I can relate to that. Interesting tip sitting on a wheel to reach higher. I love the idea of having a roommate who uses a chair (if I wanted a roommate). I definitely feel better or more normal when I'm in casual situations around other wheelers. Suddenly it seems like there is a spot in the world for me.

      I don't like Southern California, seeing L.A. isn't a lot of fun but hey, it's where they live. I don't know, not sure what I think. I will watch more episodes as they come out and I am glad I saw this one.

      Comment


        #18
        [QUOTE=grommet;1538843]I definitely feel better or more normal when I'm in casual situations around other wheelers. Suddenly it seems like there is a spot in the world for me.


        This is exactly what is great about this show!

        Comment


          #19
          New York Times review

          June 3, 2012
          By NEIL GENZLINGER

          “Push Girls,” a reality show about five attractive women in wheelchairs, is likely to engender a number of reactions in viewers, not all of them helpful to the cause of illuminating the lives of people with disabilities. From the premiere, showing Monday night on the Sundance Channel, it’s not entirely clear which of those reactions the series’s creators are going for. But the intent seems to be good, and if they can find the elusive line between voyeuristic and didactic, the show could become something of a milestone for a lot of people who have felt invisible for a long time.

          In the first episode we meet four Los Angeles friends — Angela Rockwood, Auti Angel and Tiphany Adams, who were paralyzed in car accidents, and Mia Schaikewitz, whose paralysis resulted from a medical condition. (Chelsie Hill, who was also injured in a car accident, will be added to the group later.) The “push” in the show’s title doesn’t refer to assistance these women need to get around. It’s push as in boundary pushing.
          The show quickly makes clear just how independent these women are, with shots of Ms. Adams driving, Ms. Angel grabbing something off a high shelf at a grocery store and so on. And it just as quickly answers the two questions that many able-bodied people unfamiliar with this universe immediately have (and, yes, sometimes still bluntly ask): How did you end up in that chair, and can you still have sex?

          The accidents and Ms. Schaikewitz’s condition (a ruptured blood vessel in her spinal cord that, she recounts, “paralyzed me from the waist down over the course of a half-day”) are summarized, but the four women we initially meet seem long past the brooding stage. As for sex, various boyfriends and, in Ms. Adams’s case, a girlfriend, are introduced, and Ms. Angel, who is married, is contemplating trying to have a child.
          “Being 42 and in a wheelchair, most people don’t think that I can have a baby,” she says. “But I physically can. I just don’t know if I’m ready to give up my career and my independence.” (She was a dancer before her accident and still is.)

          The premiere episode tends to lapse into a “You go, girl” mode typical of shallow treatments of disability, with fist-pumping and treacly background music. It’s a tone that subtly demeans, suggesting that simple things like having head shots taken (Ms. Rockwood is trying to restart a modeling career) must be applauded because, golly, for someone in a wheelchair to do anything other than sit there is a triumph.

          A little of that may be necessary to hook an audience that has come to expect this treatment whenever a person with a disability turns up on television, but the faster this show sheds that tone and its preoccupation with sex, the more useful it will be. There are numerous other things we’d like to know about these interesting women besides the particulars of their love lives: their finances, their experiences on the job, their journey to get to the confidence level they seem to have achieved, their hopes for new technologies and medical breakthroughs.

          Another challenge for “Push Girls” is dispelling the impression that these women are representative. Certain viewers might well look at them and conclude, “Gorgeous, smart, independent; I guess the disabled-Americans problem has been solved, so I can go back to not thinking about it.”

          The reality, of course, is that vast numbers of people in wheelchairs aren’t young and independent, are in poor physical health, don’t have money and can’t even get interviewed for jobs. The show needs to make sure to convey that it is about five unique and engaging individuals who can shed light on some aspects of the disabilities universe but aren’t that whole universe.
          __________________
          stephen@bike-on.com

          Comment


            #20
            I haven't seen the show, but thank god we have the Times. That's some seriously intelligent and informed writing.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by brian View Post
              I haven't seen the show, but thank god we have the Times. That's some seriously intelligent and informed writing.
              I agree that it was a well-written and thoughtful review. I just checked out the reviewer's bio, he has a daughter with a serious health issue (Rett syndrome), which informs his perspective.
              stephen@bike-on.com

              Comment


                #22
                OK, I am going to disagree with most peoples praise of the show. There were times I found myself absolutely wincing. First of all it is far too "body beautiful" centered, which makes it not much different than reality shows in general that lack any sort of totally normal looking person, but that is certainly not my biggest gripe. When the quad said she needed 24/7 "nursing care" I started to loose it. She is not ill, she is disabled, and she needs help getting dressed, bathed, whatever. She is in a mega-expensive blinged out chair (as they all are) and could push just fine, so the old "they must need help with everything" mantra was just affirmed for millions of viewers who do not know otherwise. While it is all very cute and athletic that one of them bounced down a couple of stairs in some sort of frontward suicidal leap, a lot of us can't do anything like that. My concern about this level of "see, I can do anything!!!" sort of defeats the purpose of people being asked to understand that access is important, that ramps provide equality, and so on. On a personal note Auti spending all of her time in what felt like a perpetual wheelie I found annoying as hell, and had I been in the same room with her I would have been sorely tempted to grab her front casters and push them towards the floor. We get it, you can do a wheelie! Yay for you, but really, don't you think you take it a bit far and are essentially a giant show-off? Then, of course there was talk of how broke the quad is, although they all seem to have endless wardrobes of clothes appropriate for high end clubs (or hooking) and at least two of them drive cars that are top of the line convertibles. Doesn't really feel to me like their that desperate on the financial front. And what the hell was up with Auti, the woman who refuses to just sit still and can't resist doing endless spins and wheelies, being picked up and put on her partners back to go to the toilet? I can practically hear America thinking "but wait, all she ever talks about is how able she is and then she gets picked up and put on the toilet?" This woman can clearly do transfers, so I have no idea what grandstanding that was about. So, between the vapid "LA beautiful people" insistence, the lack of most of them making any attempt to hold down a real job, the forced conversations that felt contrived. I mean really, break up with your boyfriend so all of America can witness your pain, his pain. I know that is a hallmark of reality television, where one shares things with complete strangers, things that provide a certain level of false voyeurism, but it felt tacky to me. I am sure most of you will disagree with me, which is fine, but I had seriously hoped for better, and right now some young disabled girl is all excited about wearing 10 inch spiked heels shoes that come to deadly points in the toe area because of this show. Heel sores, shortened heel tendons, pressure sores, all of it, just to be like a push girl. I also thought if I heard the "if you can't stand up, stand out" phrase one more time I was going to barf. Not a bad phrase, at least not until it is repeated every ten minutes.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Very thoughtful Eileen. I agree with much. The "nursing 24/7" comment brought a shared look of surprise from my daughter and I when we heard that....not even PCA but, "nursing care."

                  Well, we'll see what the next episode brings......

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Eileen View Post
                    OK, I am going to disagree with most peoples praise of the show. There were times I found myself absolutely wincing. First of all it is far too "body beautiful" centered, which makes it not much different than reality shows in general that lack any sort of totally normal looking person, but that is certainly not my biggest gripe. When the quad said she needed 24/7 "nursing care" I started to loose it. She is not ill, she is disabled, and she needs help getting dressed, bathed, whatever. She is in a mega-expensive blinged out chair (as they all are) and could push just fine, so the old "they must need help with everything" mantra was just affirmed for millions of viewers who do not know otherwise. While it is all very cute and athletic that one of them bounced down a couple of stairs in some sort of frontward suicidal leap, a lot of us can't do anything like that. My concern about this level of "see, I can do anything!!!" sort of defeats the purpose of people being asked to understand that access is important, that ramps provide equality, and so on. On a personal note Auti spending all of her time in what felt like a perpetual wheelie I found annoying as hell, and had I been in the same room with her I would have been sorely tempted to grab her front casters and push them towards the floor. We get it, you can do a wheelie! Yay for you, but really, don't you think you take it a bit far and are essentially a giant show-off? Then, of course there was talk of how broke the quad is, although they all seem to have endless wardrobes of clothes appropriate for high end clubs (or hooking) and at least two of them drive cars that are top of the line convertibles. Doesn't really feel to me like their that desperate on the financial front. And what the hell was up with Auti, the woman who refuses to just sit still and can't resist doing endless spins and wheelies, being picked up and put on her partners back to go to the toilet? I can practically hear America thinking "but wait, all she ever talks about is how able she is and then she gets picked up and put on the toilet?" This woman can clearly do transfers, so I have no idea what grandstanding that was about. So, between the vapid "LA beautiful people" insistence, the lack of most of them making any attempt to hold down a real job, the forced conversations that felt contrived. I mean really, break up with your boyfriend so all of America can witness your pain, his pain. I know that is a hallmark of reality television, where one shares things with complete strangers, things that provide a certain level of false voyeurism, but it felt tacky to me. I am sure most of you will disagree with me, which is fine, but I had seriously hoped for better, and right now some young disabled girl is all excited about wearing 10 inch spiked heels shoes that come to deadly points in the toe area because of this show. Heel sores, shortened heel tendons, pressure sores, all of it, just to be like a push girl. I also thought if I heard the "if you can't stand up, stand out" phrase one more time I was going to barf. Not a bad phrase, at least not until it is repeated every ten minutes.
                    I don't disagree with anything you wrote, Eileen. I think you pretty much nailed it.

                    The show's wanting for IQ and this group, like, doesn't have enough for me to, you know, like, tune in again. I mean, really!! I'll admit that I enjoyed when Tiphany bent forward while at the gym flaunting her substantial cleavage. It's appreciated, but not enough of a thrill, however, to get me set my DVR.
                    stephen@bike-on.com

                    Comment


                      #25
                      If you're not on a vent you don't need 24/h care
                      C5/C6 Complete since 08/22/09

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Sooooo, my Mobility dude was here today, and he knows these girls. He said they work for Colours. Well, his words were, "they belong to Colours" and have plenty of $$$! He said, they're pushing the Colours chairs, everyone wants them but ins. won't pay because they're so expensive. Colours is hoping the show sales the chair.

                        I haven't watched yet, but assumed the girls are riding Colours? It's on demand, I'll give it a peek. His comments and this thread has my curiosity!

                        T
                        Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

                        "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
                        — Marianne Williamson

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Charlottes Web View Post
                          Sooooo, my Mobility dude was here today, and he knows these girls. He said they work for Colours. Well, his words were, "they belong to Colours" and have plenty of $$$! He said, they're pushing the Colours chairs, everyone wants them but ins. won't pay because they're so expensive. Colours is hoping the show sales the chair.

                          I haven't watched yet, but assumed the girls are riding Colours? It's on demand, I'll give it a peek. His comments and this thread has my curiosity!

                          T
                          Three of our four starlets are using Colours chairs (yuck!) but I doubt they're earning "plenty of $$$" from endorsements.

                          stephen@bike-on.com

                          Comment


                            #28
                            I noticed the Colours chairs as well but wasnt surprised, they are a CA based company, these chairs are popular on the west coast. They are also not difficult to get, my son has one, insurance paid for it. Like other chairs, Colours has pros and cons.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              personally, because it is so much like other reality shows like real housewives, is why it's so great. the only real difference is the chairs. showing that there really is no difference between disabled and non-disabled women.

                              i'm sorry if their good looks offend you? i don't consider myself and sort of beauty, but i take with my appearance. i buy clothes on sale, splurge on a necklace or pair of earrings or nail polish when i can. i also drive a sporty car. sorry if i dont look poor. or disabled enough? also after living in one place for so long i have amassed quite the clothing collection. no idea how much i wouldve amassed after living with a famous husband for 10yrs. she also said that they were recently going through a divorce and suddenly she had things like a mortgage to pay for. and at the time was not a model so contextual clues are important here. perhaps they should go for the grody poor look and smell bad. that will do wonders for the disabled image and be great for job interviews!

                              i once met a guy at wheelchair racing nationals that was always doing a wheelie and spinning around. so i asked why and he said it was because it was fun and couldnt stand sitting still. no idea why others need to cramp on others' joy or assume they are just show off.

                              re the shoes: if some young girl is wearing high heels to the point of having health problems as a result, this is NOT the fault of television but of poor parenting. there are plenty of women in chairs that wear heels with NO issues. and many women have come to these forums asking about what kinds of shoes can they were. it is not a guaranteed thing that you will have a problem. that will happen with ANY shoes. so if the shoe fits....

                              tho i do agree with the 24/7 care. it looks like she would benefit from some of the expertise from this site. no idea if they know that such a community is welcome to them but boy i'd love to see their reactions if they read some of these comments. especially auti. never underestimate a girl from the ghetto.


                              i am kind of laughing. if this is how ppl think of this group of disabled women, what the hell are you thinking of me when you see real housewives of atlanta? i can assure you, not all of america thinks that all black people think there are tigers in south africa. but your mileage may vary
                              "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
                              http://www.elportavoz.com/

                              Comment


                                #30
                                E, I dont agree with your comments on the show. I liked how stylish they were, Auti isnt my style but she is interesting. My son is constantly doing wheelies, its part of his pressure relief, and it has taught him balance. He also has learned to go down stairs...frontward and backward. Came in very handy when there was a fire drill at school. I dont think they came across as "having it all" they were working toward their goals. Of course there has to be some drama, it is television.

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