Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

vitamin B12 deficiency

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    vitamin B12 deficiency

    anyone here deficient in vitamin B12 supposed to be quite common in all types of SCI's

    #2
    Borderline anemic because of iron stores, not a B12 deficiency. Also Vitamin D is a big one in SCI.
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

    Comment


      #3
      Vitamins

      Why vitamin D thought it was from daylight thanks for your reply

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by teaman2758 View Post
        Why vitamin D thought it was from daylight thanks for your reply
        Excerpt from US News "Health" http://health.usnews.com/health-news...-for-vitamin-d

        "In the winter, it's impossible to produce vitamin D from the sun if you live north of Atlanta because the sun never gets high enough in the sky for its ultraviolet B rays to penetrate the atmosphere. But summer is a great time to stock up on the nutrient. When the sun's UV-B rays hit the skin, a reaction takes place that enables skin cells to manufacture vitamin D. If you're fair skinned, experts say going outside for 10 minutes in the midday sun—in shorts and a tank top with no sunscreen—will give you enough radiation to produce about 10,000 international units of the vitamin. Dark-skinned individuals and the elderly also produce less vitamin D, and many folks don't get enough of the nutrient from dietary sources like fatty fish and fortified milk.

        The government's dietary recommendations are 200 IUs a day up to age 50, 400 IUs to age 70, and 600 IUs over 70. But many experts believe that these recommendations are far too low to maintain healthful vitamin D levels. They advocate for supplementation in the winter of about 2,000 IUs per day and a dose of daily sunshine in the summer."


        All the best,
        GJ

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by teaman2758 View Post
          anyone here deficient in vitamin B12 supposed to be quite common in all types of SCI's
          Here are some threads referencing Vitamin B12 on the Care Cure Community Forums.

          All the best,
          GJ

          Comment


            #6
            I have'nt had any problems with Vitamin B, but all kinds with Potassium, Protein, and on occasion Vitamin D.

            It was pretty easy to clear up the Vitamin D, but since I don't seem to eat as much as I use to, I stuggled a bit with the protein, and whenever I can afford them, I get protein bars to eat. I struggle with the potassium because I have swelling problems and take diuretics everyday.

            Comment


              #7
              I have low sodium.
              Alan

              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

              Comment


                #8
                Vitamin B12 deficiency actually isn't "common" in people with SCI, per se.

                BUT low B12 can cause a toxic injury to the spinal cord, actually. So maybe that's where the misperception comes from that it is common.

                B12 deficiency happens frequently in vegans, some people on a gluten free diet, and some vegetarians who can't get everything they need from their diet and forget to supplement.

                Vitamin D deficiency is pretty common in all people. And it is more common in the elderly and people with a disability and anyone who doesn't get out enough in places with adequate year-long sun exposure.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Vitamin B12 deficiency may occur with aging, as intrinsic factor (which is produced in your stomach and is needed to absorb this vitamin) may not be produced as well in many as they age.

                  Metformin also can interfere with intrinsic factor production, which can cause a lot of people with Type II diabetes to be deficient in B12.

                  We recently had a SCI/D patient on my unit who acquired her spinal cord damage due to long-term B12 deficiency, which is one of the more exotic causes of posterior cord syndrome. Unfortunately, hers was not diagnosed early enough to prevent some pretty significant cord damage, and although she is supplemented now, the damage appears to be permanent.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That's too bad! I never realized until the last couple of years the damage that can be done by being deficient in Vitamins!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      B12 deficiency

                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                      Vitamin B12 deficiency may occur with aging, as intrinsic factor (which is produced in your stomach and is needed to absorb this vitamin) may not be produced as well in many as they age.

                      Metformin also can interfere with intrinsic factor production, which can cause a lot of people with Type II diabetes to be deficient in B12.

                      We recently had a SCI/D patient on my unit who acquired her spinal cord damage due to long-term B12 deficiency, which is one of the more exotic causes of posterior cord syndrome. Unfortunately, hers was not diagnosed early enough to prevent some pretty significant cord damage, and although she is supplemented now, the damage appears to be permanent.

                      (KLD)

                      Minimum levels globally are set differently, in the U.K. 130-900, but they maybe much higher elsewhere. If you already have a SCI, and then are in the lower levels of B12, or are deficient in the vitamin, obviously you do not want extra problems with spinal cord deterioation as your patient above has experienced. My level at present is 119, i.e. 11 below the advised limit !! I am not sure if malabsorption is common in SCI's per se even if the intrinsic factor is present.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Please see my additional info re B12

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by teaman2758 View Post
                          Please see my additional info re B12
                          This level is very low. Have you talked with your doctor about how to correct it? Yes, your level is low enough that you could have many symptoms/problems associated with it. Get it up.

                          You should have a work-up with your primary care doctor or with a gastrenterologist for your low B12. You need to also have your folate level checked, and blood tests to look for antibodies against intrinsic factor, and a few other things.

                          No, malabsorption is not typically associated with SCI. But low B12 is common, relatively, so it could have nothing to do with your SCI.

                          Are you vegan/vegetarian? If so, review your diet with your doctor or a nutritionist so you get appropriate nutrition.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Essentially the most critical vitamin for the well being of the red blood cells and for the typical functioning of our own nerves is the vitamin b12. This particular vitamin may be provided by means of food items (meat, fresh fish, and dairy products) or via vitamin b12 health supplements. The particular lack of vit b12 is not very prevalent but there are many people who knowledge it and should take most of these vitamins. Inside the subsequent lines we're talk about concerning the positive aspects of b12 vitamin.



                            This particular vitamin might be kept inside the liver organ for a long time so there is no require for us for being frightened of vitamin b12 insufficiency. However, older individuals more than 65 are inside the risk-group which has probabilities to be prone to vitamin b12 deficiency symptoms in women.



                            The health benefits of vit B12 are many. For instance it plays a fantastic function in the protection against megaloblastic anaemia. This kind of anaemia accounts for the overgrowth of red blood cells also it impacts their regular performance. We've stated earlier that b12 vitamin is beneficial on your nervous system and based on that vitamin b12 insufficiency may lead to nerve issues, like weak muscles, dementia, eyesight difficulties and so on.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I have been B-12 deficient since before my injury. I need shots every month for it, my body won't absorb it in any other form! Its a pain in the butt, but my energy is so better after my shot! I can def feel it towards the end of the month when I need another one!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X