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    #31
    Originally posted by crypticgimp View Post
    dr brad berk, md, phd. he is head of strong memorial hospital here in rochester, ny. he was only recently sci'd: http://interactive.wxxi.org/news/lea...w-dr-brad-berk
    It's good that such a high profile guy like this can now share his perspective of sci. Of course, I'm sorry he was injured.

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      #32
      Bill Skelza, PM&R with SCI specialization is at Craig Hospital since last fall. He is a para. My husband also had another PM&R doc at the Dallas VA a few years ago who was a para, Lance Goetz, I believe he has transferred to the SCI VA program in Virginia.

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
        It's good that such a high profile guy like this can now share his perspective of sci. Of course, I'm sorry he was injured.
        i am sorry he was injured as well. but he really is starting to make some good changes for the hospital now that he gets it. he is also starting to venture out and join the NSCIA community we have here. everyone has just been so so supportive, it's great. and you can tell he listens. i was just encouraging him to get a van and learn how to drive.

        plus have you seen all the research he has done? yowzers! i'm glad he has survived, is doing well and his outlook is great.
        "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
        http://www.elportavoz.com/

        Comment


          #34
          I went into hospital a few years back for a nasty kidney stone and the head doctor was a guy with a disease much like my Beckars MD. I did not ask him though, Im not rude. Anyway he was quite nice to me and seemed to show me a lot of respect, so much so he'd shot down (metaphorically) a smart assed young colleague in front of me, it was a blast.

          Anyway, respect...doctor....who ever you were.

          apart from that MORE DOCTORS WITH DISABILITIES PLEASE we need 'em fighting for us!
          "The problem with self improvement is knowing when to quit." "Diamond" David Lee Roth.

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by canuck View Post
            That would be a awesome a pain doctor that gets it, although I wouldn't wish neuropain on anybody.
            Found his name. He is Dr. Michael Negraeff at VGH. His area of expertise is spinal cord injury pain and Neuropathic Pain.

            That's an impressive list of MDs with spinal cord injury. I would not have guessed that many.

            Comment


              #36
              I am a doc. I got injured one month into my internship. I returned and finished the internship and wanted to be an oncologist. I had and have no problem doing my job, physical exams, central lines, etc. I had to switch hospitals due to my boss being a bully. I am now a board certified psychiatrist. I know 4 other docs in wheelchairs, two are internists, one a physiatrist.

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                #37
                Originally posted by captainwelch View Post
                I just applied to medical school. I'm finishing my undergrad a year early, and I missed most medical school application deadlines, so I only applied to a couple of schools with later deadlines. No interviews or rejections yet!

                If I'm rejected I will be reapplying.
                I wish the best of luck. I hope you get into medical school soon. Keep us all posted here on Care Cure.
                Keep rolling on.

                Comment


                  #38
                  Just saw this post. Lots of replies which is nice.

                  One of the more famous Physicians in wheelchairs is Charles Krauthammer(sp), syndicated columnist and frequent Fox News contributor. He is a board certified Psychiatrist, trained at Harvard/MGH I believe.

                  i'm a Diagnostic Radiologist. Injured in high school in '81. T5 complete. Different world back then. There was no ADA then and accessibility was nowhere near what it is today.

                  Small high school in Texas, small college in Central Texas then Medical school in Houston. I was the only person in wheelchair in all 3 schools for my entire duration. I was the ultimate minority. Strong support from family and friends was as important, if not more so, than all the hard work and long hours it took to achieve my goals.

                  Residency in Michigan(once again only WC) for four more years and then back to Texas, practicing for the last 16 years. Still going strong, love my specialty of Radiology due to the technological advances and fast pace.

                  Was never a real social person in college or medical school, but not a hermit either. Was shocked and kind of proud that in my medical school graduating class more people chose PM&R as a specialty than ever before(or since) at our school. I'd like to think I had something to do with that. Hopefully it was from my example of working hard, determination and never playing the WC card(never asking for special favors or exemptions because of my condition). Maybe they just liked my blue eyes...

                  Good luck to those choosing or continuing a career in medicine. Its a long hard road but well worth it in the end.

                  Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns associated with training.

                  Brian

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by BriRi View Post
                    Just saw this post. Lots of replies which is nice.

                    One of the more famous Physicians in wheelchairs is Charles Krauthammer(sp), syndicated columnist and frequent Fox News contributor. He is a board certified Psychiatrist, trained at Harvard/MGH I believe.

                    i'm a Diagnostic Radiologist. Injured in high school in '81. T5 complete. Different world back then. There was no ADA then and accessibility was nowhere near what it is today.

                    Small high school in Texas, small college in Central Texas then Medical school in Houston. I was the only person in wheelchair in all 3 schools for my entire duration. I was the ultimate minority. Strong support from family and friends was as important, if not more so, than all the hard work and long hours it took to achieve my goals.

                    Residency in Michigan(once again only WC) for four more years and then back to Texas, practicing for the last 16 years. Still going strong, love my specialty of Radiology due to the technological advances and fast pace.

                    Was never a real social person in college or medical school, but not a hermit either. Was shocked and kind of proud that in my medical school graduating class more people chose PM&R as a specialty than ever before(or since) at our school. I'd like to think I had something to do with that. Hopefully it was from my example of working hard, determination and never playing the WC card(never asking for special favors or exemptions because of my condition). Maybe they just liked my blue eyes...

                    Good luck to those choosing or continuing a career in medicine. Its a long hard road but well worth it in the end.

                    Feel free to contact me if you have any questions or concerns associated with training.

                    Brian
                    It's good to see that you've been going at it for so long! I'll contact you if I have questions/concerns in the future.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Here are some additional resources for physicians with disabilities, or those who have a disability and are contemplating a career in medicine:

                      http://www.physicianswithdisabilities.org/

                      http://www.disabilitysociety.org/

                      http://www.physiatry.org/education/p...-%20DeLisa.pdf

                      http://www.amsa.org/AMSA/Homepage/Pu...09/tnp498.aspx

                      http://www.westernu.edu/cdhp-resourc...es-persistence

                      http://dps.sagepub.com/content/1/3/53.abstract

                      For Canadians:

                      http://www.capd.ca/


                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        medical school after SCI

                        One more resource...

                        I went to medical school 8 years after a C6 motor complete injury. No assistant, used a stand-up chair and tenodesis splints in anatomy, chair for OR. Did basic exams - heart/lung/abdomen etc from a chair. Excused from performing tasks requiring strength/dexterity/standing; same for procedures; had to be able to "understand and direct the methodology involved" in all circumstances, as per AAP guidelines. Had same clinical load as others, did all the calls. Have practiced 20 years. Boarded in PMR and SCI Medicine.

                        Not a career for the faint of heart, but very rewarding. Please contact me as needed for a letter of support for med school admission, I have sent one on behalf of a number of students.

                        Ed Nieshoff MD
                        ecnieshoff@gmail.com
                        Ed from Detroit

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Originally posted by enieshoff View Post
                          One more resource...

                          I went to medical school 8 years after a C6 motor complete injury. No assistant, used a stand-up chair and tenodesis splints in anatomy, chair for OR. Did basic exams - heart/lung/abdomen etc from a chair. Excused from performing tasks requiring strength/dexterity/standing; same for procedures; had to be able to "understand and direct the methodology involved" in all circumstances, as per AAP guidelines. Had same clinical load as others, did all the calls. Have practiced 20 years. Boarded in PMR and SCI Medicine.

                          Not a career for the faint of heart, but very rewarding. Please contact me as needed for a letter of support for med school admission, I have sent one on behalf of a number of students.

                          Ed Nieshoff MD
                          ecnieshoff@gmail.com
                          Did you do 30 hour shifts sitting in your chair every 2 days?

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                            Here are some additional resources for physicians with disabilities, or those who have a disability and are contemplating a career in medicine:



                            For Canadians:

                            http://www.capd.ca/


                            (KLD)
                            Thanks for the resource. It's one I'd never heard of.

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by Cripply View Post
                              Did you do 30 hour shifts sitting in your chair every 2 days?
                              No overnight call since internship/residency, but yes, I did some long shifts - usually a little under 30 hours - in at 7:00am first day, out at noon next day. Call was usually every 4 in my internship, less in residency. Sometimes a little sleep, if lucky. Standard call room/mattress etc. Never had a skin issue. In retrospect, not sure how I did it.
                              Ed from Detroit

                              Comment


                                #45
                                The damn doc that put me in this chair had the balls to come into the room one day, and say, "Did you hear about the guy hit by car, he was a docotor here in the spine unit. Geez I went to see him in rehab, gawd the things he's got to learn to do, can you imagine?"
                                SHIT YESS I CAN IMAGINE!! I just wheeled around and left, waht a douche bag. He needs to retire.

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