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    #16
    My inlaws and neighbors have had beagles and they can be barkers.

    Love the retired greyhounds. Not a lot of grooming, mellow, no barking, trained and just plain cool looking but they are tall.

    Labs...my daughter has a three year old chocolate lab that is about 50 lbs. The grooming is very minimal and she shed pretty heavy last spring for about a week or so but she loves being brushed so no biggie. She is a service dog and goes to a lot of Twins games even though they really suck this year.....

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      #17
      Beagle tends to be barkers. DO a lot of research on the breed. I usually say shelter dogs are the most thankful and loyal, but I adopted a shelter dog with a lot of separation anxiety. He has been difficult. I suggest finding a rescue that fosters. They will have kept the dog/puppy in their home and can tell you their traits and if they are truly potty trained. A good rescue won't lie because they want the animal to have a happy home. They don't want you returning the dog to them, (but will also take them back if it doesn't work out.) Also they are freed to pull another dog from the shelter so you are still saving a life. Your shelter should know the resues or check www.petfinder.com
      If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


      Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

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        #18
        Originally posted by baldfatdad View Post
        Has anyone tried a rescued racing grayhound. The ones I have met were well mannered, affectionate and well behaved. Most have been just lazy. Don't want to get off the couch. I guess they figured they did their running and were done.
        yes. they need a coat in cold weather. sometimes they need boots also as snow and salt are irritating to their feet, and they may lick and chew them raw trying to get the salt off. booties prevented that. They need elevated food bowls to prevent bloat, which can be fatel, as it was to my dog. some may be difficult to catch if they get loose. My buddy was not though.

        my dog and other adopted greyhounds I met at dog parks, were dignified, loyal, and kind.

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          #19
          My neighbor has a retired greyhound that is a gentle couch potato. My wife and I had 2 Newfoundlands (look like black St Bernards) they were the sweetest dogs ever. We could walk them w leash on our laps (we are both in chairs) because they were not excited about other dogs, cats, squirrels, etc. We selected the breed after lots of research. They are rated low on aggression and dominance over owners and especially because they are rated very low on vigor - the inherent need for lots of activity. They also are deeply devoted to family and protective of children. The only times I had control issues were at events where I had the dogs on leash and there were nearby fireworks or in one case antique cannon. a 150 lb dog can pull you pretty fast face down across the grass at the end of a leash. The biggest downside is health issues, imo show breeders have bred lines too closely trying for breed perfection and have unintentionally bred in health problems.

          If you want a Newfie the better breeders will probably want to interview you 1st. I suggest for any dog you want (if it's a pup) try to see both mother and father, but especially the mother. Watch out for signs of aggression, being high strung, etc. For an adult rescue dog, see the dog several times, walk the dog, etc. By the way, beagles are the most frequently lost dog due to their tendency to find a rabbit trail and become oblivious to all else. We owned several small dogs but never had complete confidence in control as we did over our Newfies. The 2nd one we had we adopted at age 6 after she finished her dog show career. Sometimes breeders have dogs like this they will part with - they are already well trained for oibedience for the show ring.

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            #20
            My dog Gun going for a ride
            Donnie: Dr. Xiao, What are your thoughts on a cure/combination therapy for SCI's??
            CG Xiao: Donnie, I don't want to disappoint you, but I think it is impossible to restore the continuity of the cord or "bridge the gap" in the near future, let's say: 50 years. Dr Wise Young has been my most respected scientist in SCI. He has dedicated and contributed to SCI no other can match.

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              #21
              Our Newfies loved their rides. The male used to get an erection when he got in the van. Once they both observed how the lift worked they had no intertest in jumping in and out. It was lift only.

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                #22
                Please think twice before getting puppies - they are a lot of work. We had to work with our puppy (border collie / eskimo spitz mix) for a year or so before she stopped chewing on furnitures, messing up the house, etc.. But then again she's our first puppy so we didn't know what we were doing either. She is very intelligent (learned to do tricks), fast (likes to catch squirrels) and lovable and all that. But she also shed like crazy, so we have a vacuum cleaner especially for her.

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                  #23
                  Yes, Kelly, our Eskies (American Eskimos)(Spitz=any dog w/pointed ears and plumed tail) were smart & terribly mischievous as pups, basically you have to wait for them to grow out of their destructive stage. Once they pass their crazy phase they are super sweet and easy to care for. They do shed a lot. We also have a Keeshond (Spitz also) that does not shed.

                  For anyone wanting a dog, I recommend researching the breeds, mutts are really best overall for ease and health since they are not bred for aesthetics. Rescuing is ideal.

                  Small dogs =small bowels & bladders= messes indoors unless your home all the time.

                  To me, a pet is worth any and all the work if you can manage. The unconditional love they give back is immeasurable.

                  Here is a neat test to find your ideal match: http://animal.discovery.com/breedsel...dogselector.do
                  "The sweet is not as sweet without the bitter"
                  ~"Vanilla Sky"~

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                    #24
                    yes my pure breed yorkie can only eat her dog food. she cant even eat dog teats or dental bones without throwing up everywhere. and we have had her for 2 years and she just now got potty trained. I love her to death but it really took the joy out of having her with all her training

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                      #25
                      Beagles are loud. Terriers are nuts, lots of energy ready to fight anyone, or anything. Border collies and australian sheep dogs are smarter than people and can read minds. Big dogs= big food bills.
                      Check this: http://www.akc.org/future_dog_owner/find_breed.cfm I thought they had a survey you could take and it told you what dogs might suit you.
                      Mixed breads are great. My dad called them Curb Setters, because they would sit on the curb and wait for us to come home from school.

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                        #26
                        we got a shar pei about 2 years before i was injured and he is the best dog i have ever had. my wife worked 12 hour shifts and i was gone a lot for work and he peed in the apartment once.....before we had him snipped he did like to mark his territory so there were a few of those. i have heard the horror stories with the breed but we found a breeder that bred healthy dogs not wrinkly ones. "mickey" is 10 now and as long as we feed him good dog food he has no allergies and he is up for a walk at a moments notice, or will find the most comfortable spot to nap in the house...what ever the day calls for. they do shed some and can be stubborn, he believes he is a person not a silly dog. even got him a tux and he was in our wedding. . . . i know the wacko flag just went up but we are not like that lol.

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                          #27
                          Yorkies are notorious for being hard to potty train. I wonder why?
                          If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


                          Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by baldfatdad View Post
                            Terriers are nuts, lots of energy ready to fight anyone, or anything. Border collies and australian sheep dogs are smarter than people and can read minds. Big dogs= big food bills.
                            Check this: http://www.akc.org/future_dog_owner/find_breed.cfm I thought they had a survey you could take and it told you what dogs might suit you.
                            Mixed breads are great. My dad called them Curb Setters, because they would sit on the curb and wait for us to come home from school.
                            Great post..I have a yorkie/maltese mix and it is been hell to potty trian..she is just darn stubborn! But like I said before, I need a dog I can get up close too..in my lap that I can pick up and put up to my face and I can hug and kiss to death! feel the warmth of her body on my cheek..(she is my affection outlet now that my daughters are away at school and while my husband is away at work) medium size dogs are out of my reach so to speak..unless I am in bed with them..which isnt often enough.

                            Also my family has a sheltie..and she is the smartest dog.so sensitive..where did you read learn that collies read minds? does that apply to shelties too? lol miniture collie? I would believe it lol!
                            Last edited by sherocksandsherolls; 27 Sep 2011, 6:28 PM.
                            "The trick is in what one emphasizes. We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves happy. The amount of work is the same.” ~Carlos Castaneda

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                              #29
                              My border collie mix was the best dog I ever had. She knew words that surprised me. I knew she was smart, it wasn't until I got Jack the monster that I realized how smart.
                              I miss her terribly.
                              If you can't handle me at my worst, then you sure as hell don't deserve me at my best.


                              Sometimes it is easier to widen doors than it is to open minds.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Also my family has a sheltie..and she is the smartest dog.so sensitive..where did you read learn that collies read minds? does that apply to shelties too? lol miniture collie? I would believe it lol![/QUOTE]

                                Had a border collie. They and the ausy's are sheep herding dogs. But they will herd anything. Ducks, kids, horses, cattle. I would just think about going to town and she would be sitting in the back of the pick-up. We were at a friends house, watching football. The dog went outside. Couple minutes latter we hear the cows. Look out the window and she is bring them in from the far end of the field. My buddy looks at me and says he was thinking about moving the cattle after the game was over.
                                She did stuff like that all the time.
                                But herding/working dogs usually don't make good sit around, companion dogs. They need to work.

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