Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How do you spend your times?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    The first couple years after my accident I earned my masters degree. Then I was bored and spent time at home doing nothing. I started teaching online classes part time in 2005, and was hired as a full time instructor at a state university in 2006. I still teach some online classes, but am mainly on campus teaching in a classroom the last few years. I was promoted to assistant professor last year and will have my PhD by the end of the year. I like PhD better than ABD.

    Comment


      #17
      Volunteering, working out, developing/writing a business plan, creating fiber art, squeezing in a social life.

      Comment


        #18
        Spending Time /

        Since SCI visited me I spend much of my time volunteering, social activities and attempting to learn the art of wood carving. I am active with the Paralyzed Veterans of America. I seldom find myself bored or unhappy with my paralysis.
        You C.A.N.
        Conquer Adversity Now

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Mike Honcho View Post
          I like PhD better than ABD.
          I'm currently ABD (history) and hating it. Can't quite seem to muster the enthusiasm to get the damn thing done. Other than that, a partner and I rent wheelchair vans and I dabble in stock trading. Internet, family, friends. A bit of cooking. Nothing very exciting, but enough to get through each day without going comatose.

          Comment


            #20
            Now that I have stopped working I spend a lot of time online, in addition to reading and tv watching. I also plant a small flower garden each summer, or sometimes buy the flowers already in pots so all I have to do is tend them.

            Comment


              #21
              If you can, go to school. If you can't, get yourself a BookShare account and learn anything you want.
              Get rid of cable TV. Your aides will complain, but why should you pay money to rot your mind? Choose a couple of TV shows to follow for relaxation, but other than that, keep the TV off.
              NYC Disability Forum (@DisabledNYC on Twitter)

              Comment


                #22
                Stay home mom. Cook, clean, etc. for now. I read, spend time on here, exercise, get out in the woods when i can, and play poker tuesday nights. Looking forward to finding some kind of work. I signed up at the local college and may take a class this fall. i may try to harvest a Bear with my bow this year. No T.V. here either. Well we have one but it only plays a couple of backyardigan or max and ruby videos right before bedtime.

                Comment


                  #23
                  I believe that surely the SCI who with function of hands and those who without function of hands is totally different. What about the life of higher level SCI? For me, the things I can do it myself is computer and reading book only.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Sleep, read stuff on the computer, play games, get stoned, argue with the tv, google crap my dad says and prove its bullshit.....
                    c3/c4, injured 2007

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by kimsoon84 View Post
                      I believe that surely the SCI who with function of hands and those who without function of hands is totally different. What about the life of higher level SCI? For me, the things I can do it myself is computer and reading book only.
                      You are right Kimsoon. It is much different when you have a higher level SCI. I think some people forget that.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by LindaT View Post
                        You are right Kimsoon. It is much different when you have a higher level SCI. I think some people forget that.
                        Even being paralyzed from the waist down, I can't really get my head around losing my upper body, too. So much of my attitude of gratitude is focused on what I 'still have left'. It's almost as if a high quads experience is as different from my life as mine is from an AB's. Sorta the same, but very different. Not necessarily 'worse', though, I think that has more to do with attitude than life's circumstances. I know low paras who couldn't cope and took their own life and a local 'trapped in' quad, 30 years post, who is vibrant, positive and a great example of human adaptability. It takes all kinds, and the less judgment the better, I think.

                        We all share a tie that binds, this thing called SCI. It's how we can relate that makes this place so great, IMO.
                        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                        Comment


                          #27
                          I am sure it is different to be a quad but it is boring to be a para too. No job, no education, bad weather, alone nearly all the time inside in the flats. Makes me crazy to stay inside all the winter because of the snow only with the cats for company.

                          So the laptop is my friend and the books and the TV. It is better when it is summer and I can stay outside on the sidewalk cafes and see some other people, but most people work and are not home in the day. So I think it is a lonely life as a para too

                          Today it is a cold and rainy day and that means an inside day
                          TH 12, 43 years post

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Quads do have different challenges but I think we generally become more analytical and creative after our accidents. I'm not sure if your country has any assitance programs but figuring out how to go to school may give you options.


                            Originally posted by kimsoon84 View Post
                            I believe that surely the SCI who with function of hands and those who without function of hands is totally different. What about the life of higher level SCI? For me, the things I can do it myself is computer and reading book only.
                            "Never argue with an idiot; they'll drag you down to their level and other people may not be able to tell the difference."

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by kimsoon84 View Post
                              I believe that surely the SCI who with function of hands and those who without function of hands is totally different. What about the life of higher level SCI? For me, the things I can do it myself is computer and reading book only.
                              I'm a C5 with no use of my hands. If you can use a computer and read books, you can get an education.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by DaleB View Post
                                Even being paralyzed from the waist down, I can't really get my head around losing my upper body, too. So much of my attitude of gratitude is focused on what I 'still have left'. It's almost as if a high quads experience is as different from my life as mine is from an AB's. Sorta the same, but very different. Not necessarily 'worse', though, I think that has more to do with attitude than life's circumstances. I know low paras who couldn't cope and took their own life and a local 'trapped in' quad, 30 years post, who is vibrant, positive and a great example of human adaptability. It takes all kinds, and the less judgment the better, I think.

                                We all share a tie that binds, this thing called SCI. It's how we can relate that makes this place so great, IMO.
                                Hi Dale, My comment was not meant to be judgmental or pointed to anyone.
                                I just often think how much easier our life would be if only my husband could feed himself, be alone for even an hour and we did not need all of the respiratory equipment and help from aides. Yesterday he did not even have a voice.
                                His doctor said he wishes all of his patients had such a good attitude.
                                I'm surely not trying to start a quad vs para debate.
                                I wanted Kimsoon to know I understood.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X