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    How do you cope

    How do some people do it. I am a T11 complete
    Well everyone tells me to exercise and stand at least two hours a day and go here and there for physio and treatments. Well i am married and have a kid. my wife and i work 9hrs a day Mon-fri. Have to get up extra early to get to work on time due to my condition. Getting out of bed, Bathing, getting dressed and BP takes ages. I have to prepare everything beforehand to be accessable later on i hate being dependent on others for my needs.
    I don't want and cannot afford not to go to work. Everything is so bloody expensive on this dammed island.
    After work I am just too tired to go on a daily regime of exercise and standing. Quality time with family and other daily commitments will have to suffer. Some people on these threads seem to have a full time commitment to their daily needs of treatment and exercise.
    How do they cope

    #2
    First, you take a deep breath. Then you pull the camera back from the "everything" to get a bit better perspective.
    Now, are there any areas that can be creatively combined?
    (Family time while in the stander, whether that includes video games, helping the kids study, etc.)
    If nothing can be combined, first chart out a rough draft of your schedule and identify one or maybe two potential time slots a week that may offer a realistic chance for you considering energy, motivation etc.
    Then, do what you can when you can. Don't beat yourself up if you can't.

    Creative planning just may do the trick.


    Originally posted by peterf View Post
    How do some people do it. I am a T11 complete
    Well everyone tells me to exercise and stand at least two hours a day and go here and there for physio and treatments. Well i am married and have a kid. my wife and i work 9hrs a day Mon-fri. Have to get up extra early to get to work on time due to my condition. Getting out of bed, Bathing, getting dressed and BP takes ages. I have to prepare everything beforehand to be accessable later on i hate being dependent on others for my needs.
    I don't want and cannot afford not to go to work. Everything is so bloody expensive on this dammed island.
    After work I am just too tired to go on a daily regime of exercise and standing. Quality time with family and other daily commitments will have to suffer. Some people on these threads seem to have a full time commitment to their daily needs of treatment and exercise.
    How do they cope
    And the truth shall set you free.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by peterf View Post
      How do some people do it. I am a T11 complete
      Well everyone tells me to exercise and stand at least two hours a day and go here and there for physio and treatments. Well i am married and have a kid. my wife and i work 9hrs a day Mon-fri. Have to get up extra early to get to work on time due to my condition. Getting out of bed, Bathing, getting dressed and BP takes ages. I have to prepare everything beforehand to be accessable later on i hate being dependent on others for my needs.
      I don't want and cannot afford not to go to work. Everything is so bloody expensive on this dammed island.
      After work I am just too tired to go on a daily regime of exercise and standing. Quality time with family and other daily commitments will have to suffer. Some people on these threads seem to have a full time commitment to their daily needs of treatment and exercise.
      How do they cope
      I am with you man. I am a T8 complete, work full time and have a wife and kid. I stand and do email for an hour a day but as for exercise, range of motion... no time. I just really watch what I eat so I don't get fat.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Peter,

        First, I want to tell you this: the odds of this becoming easier with time are in your favor. I have no SCI, which might make you wonder how I can say that. Well, let me tell you what you and I have in common: a body that won't work the way it should, and more need for therapy and exercise than I have time in a day.

        The difference is that for me, since I have a congenital condition (cerebral palsy), it's been that way for as long as I can remember, so I can tell you: the longer you live, the more established your routines are going to become, and the more proficient you will be at things like getting dressed in the morning. Your injury is recent. You still have room for improvement there. Remember that children take years to master daily living skills, and you're essentially re-learning many of them. Cut yourself some slack.

        Also, the above is good advice. Try to combine things. Although for most of my life, I was actually able to stand under my own power (although not for long), I used to have a standing frame in school for me to stand in during the day. Later, when I worked an office job, my employer would let me do the same thing at work. I got a lot of questions about it at first, but I just told them it was like that guy with the standing desk two cubicles down, only I couldn't stand on my own for that long. And everyone was basically OK with it.

        There was a period in between when I lived in a dorm room and had no place to put the standing frame. Instead, I lay on my stomach while studying, and rode my tricycle through town for muscle strength, instead of taking the bus.

        For physical therapy, I have someone who comes to work with me at home three out of five times a week, which cuts down significantly on transportation time. Maybe you could make a similar arrangement.

        I realize few of these things will be applicable directly to your situation. I'm just putting them out here to let you know it's not impossible. You can do this! And every time it works out, you'll have a reason to be proud of yourself.

        Comment


          #5
          I have a full life. And because it is full, I can't fit in everything I should be doing....so somethings got to give. And time spent on looking after the condition of my body is what gets sacrificed.

          I think I spend 15 seconds in the morning drawing my legs up to my chest to stretch them.....and that is about it.

          Sometimes I wish I didn't have the job and the family committments etc.....so I could concentrate on being a handicap person, and do all the conditioning, strengthening and rehab etc.....

          I plan to spend my 2 week summer vacation this year in a place where I can exercise, stretch and get some sun....I heard Cyprus is good..

          Comment


            #6
            In reality, you just can't do everything. I have never used a standing frame (don't know where I'd put it and don't know when I'd use it.) I work too; no choice. No work = no health insurance. By evenings I'm usually tired. I'm careful about what I eat and get arm exercises in some evenings, but that's about it.

            It's not just us it's ABs as well. I have a friend who got recalled to an auto parts supplier after being laid off for two years. Now he works twelve hour days and is lucky to get 2 days off a month. He barely has time to breathe.
            Tom

            "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

            Comment


              #7
              same here, c7 complete, work full time, there's never any time for me, except the weekends, think thats my only relief
              We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
              Ronald Reagan

              Comment


                #8
                I'm old and tired now but the time I had the most energy was when working full time. I would come home from work, throw race chair in the back of van and head for metropark to do 10 miles. Repeat 3 times weekly. On weekend travel throughout Michigan to do a 10K, 10 miler or other race. Finish the season with Free Press Marathon. If you don't do well there find a later marathon in another state and try to make amends. In winter, set roller up in living room and 3 times weekly do 30 or 40 minutes. I think this regime actually provided energy, I was always wide awake with lots of energy. Now exist in advanced state of decrepitude brought on by age and worn out shoulders.

                Comment


                  #9
                  same here, full time student/researcher. plus i blog. plus starting different groups. plus doing things with my frat. i'll exercise when i can but then i dont do the whole standing thing. no room for it and no time for it and i always fainted as a kid when we tried.
                  "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
                  http://www.elportavoz.com/

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I keep a 10lb weight at work and thera-bands which I could use on a late afternoon or midnight shift. You must have a break time? Another member used to keep his standing frame at work.

                    It's very difficult to fit in taking care of yourself (diet, exercise) when you work full-time. Able-bodied have trouble doing it. Shift working is killer.

                    I would recommend as an 'sci oldie (26yrs this summer!) that you try to incorporate good, solid stretching into your schedule at least ... this will save you trouble in the long run. Trust me.
                    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I am seven months into injury, marathon running was my passion. Everything i did was fast
                      out of bed at 7.15am shower dressed, breakfast at work in 8.00am. found time to do everything.
                      Injury also happened fast slipped off a ladder, 2 seconds later SCI complete
                      Life's a lot slower now, much harder, do less things in more time .
                      By the way You don't look old to me my Canadian friend

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Ha thanks, but that's an older photo and 40 is less than 2yrs away, lol.

                        7 months is not a lot of time so you're going to have to cut yourself some slack.

                        Unfortunately it does take us longer to shower, use the washroom, get dressed etc. You have 50% of what you used to have (time, energy, etc).

                        Don't sweat the small stuff!
                        Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                        T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Forget the exercise nonsense! I worked 12-14 hours a day for more than 35 years without therapy or "exercise." My focus was on conserving energy. You get more than enough exercise with all the dressing, work, and family activities. Those recommendations for therapy and exercise come f'rom people who do not have a clue about what goes on in an active SCI's life. I am 73 now and with the exception of my shoulders am in pretty good shape. I have always been able to prioritize and make sure I took time "to smell the roses."
                          You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                          http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                          See my personal webpage @
                          http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by SCIfor55yrs. View Post
                            Forget the exercise nonsense! I worked 12-14 hours a day for more than 35 years without therapy or "exercise." My focus was on conserving energy. You get more than enough exercise with all the dressing, work, and family activities. Those recommendations for therapy and exercise come f'rom people who do not have a clue about what goes on in an active SCI's life. I am 73 now and with the exception of my shoulders am in pretty good shape. I have always been able to prioritize and make sure I took time "to smell the roses."
                            agreed, I never stopped long enough to find time to exercise, I get enough of that during a regular work day, I've never had a standing frame, so never have done that
                            We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
                            Ronald Reagan

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Yeah, everything take so much longer, doesn't it? I totally understand that challenge as well as the limitation of 24 hours in a day.

                              I just returned to work and am on half days for another week, then back to the full time grind. After my accident, I look at life differently. Now, I'm just grateful to have a job that I can do. It's had to fit in work, family and physical needs. However, I've scaled down my life to just those things. If I have 15 minutes, that's enough time for me to squeeze in some PT. If I have 5 minutes before work, it's good for an email to a friend. I've had to limit my expectations of myself, which has been hard. However, things have been improving gradually and I expect that some day this will all seem quite normal.

                              I totally understand your frustration and wish you the best.

                              Comment

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