Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So tired of disabled parking abusers and not accessible "accessible" parking stalls

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • So tired of disabled parking abusers and not accessible "accessible" parking stalls

    I am not sure if this is the place to get feedbacks on this topic...

    I'm so tired of seeing the Able-lers (Walkers, vertical people, non-disabled) stealing the wheelchair stalls! Our society is not educated or been made aware of the importance of these stalls to the people with a physical disabilities.

    A few days ago, I went to Safeway near my house to pickup my meds... the only stall that I could use -without having people parking beside me which blocks my ramp- turned into this

    http://cheezburger.com/View.aspx?aid=3158664960

    ... then some lady driving a Lexus cut me off and parked in the only other spot I could park at and came out with her 2 junior high aged kids. I gestured (nicely) to her; she looked at me, turned around and walked away. It took me another 20min to find accessible parking. I was not happy... Safeway said there was nothing they can do, so I called parking enforcement... who knows if they came in time or not.

    I am sure we've all experienced this in our lives. I'd love to hear your stories! How do you deal with this? Any regulations/provision in your area (from police/city/government...) to discourage able-lers from stealing wheeler stalls?
    "Always look at the bright side of life...."

  • #2
    I've got the city ADA Coordinator and the Planning Department on speed dial (not really, but their numbers are in my cell phone).

    It can take weeks, months, maybe years, but if a parking lot is not up to code, I've had some luck getting it changed by being informative (including pictures), persistent and polite.

    One thing I've found that happens frequently is that I'll talk to the planning people about a particular lot, they'll pull the drawings (on which everything is hunky-dory and up to code) and tell me there's nothing to fix. It can be a challenge to actually get a city inspector out to verify that the actual parking lot doesn't match the drawings.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Katja View Post
      I've got the city ADA Coordinator and the Planning Department on speed dial (not really, but their numbers are in my cell phone).

      It can take weeks, months, maybe years, but if a parking lot is not up to code, I've had some luck getting it changed by being informative (including pictures), persistent and polite.

      One thing I've found that happens frequently is that I'll talk to the planning people about a particular lot, they'll pull the drawings (on which everything is hunky-dory and up to code) and tell me there's nothing to fix. It can be a challenge to actually get a city inspector out to verify that the actual parking lot doesn't match the drawings.
      Katja... thanks for your reply.
      do you know much is the fine for illegal parking in wheelchair zone?
      "Always look at the bright side of life...."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ChinaDoll View Post
        Katja... thanks for your reply.
        do you know much is the fine for illegal parking in wheelchair zone?
        In the US (and I just noticed you are in Canada, so "ADA Coordinator" is not going to be applicable), it's dependent on the local entity (town, county, etc). In my town I think it's US$250. Some places in the States it's a lot more, in others a lot less.

        Comment


        • #5
          My only problem is since when did the Heart & Stroke Foundation or other ailments parking in these spots fight for them?

          These spots were originally fought for by the vets returning from Vietnam in American by the Paralyzed Vets of America ... as they had come home and were still young and healthy enough to want to return to some semblance of their lives (families, work, school). The first spot appeared in Washington DC in 1972.

          Canadians followed suit a couple of years later.

          At no time did the MS Society or the Heart & Stroke Foundation or whatever ailment you have you have anything to do with fighting for these spots ... yet they've taken them over.

          I don't know what I'd do if I had a van .. lucky to drive a car I guess .. but if you feel like taking up the battle in Canada, at least you know the history now.
          Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

          T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

          Comment


          • #6
            Agreed.....

            Comment


            • #7
              Fines

              In Lake in the Hills Illinois it was just raised to $ 350. Being an ex-cop and working for same police department my buddies are always tagging able buddied people in the spots and writing them
              What ever doesn't kill you makes you stronger

              Comment


              • #8
                I have two friends with ms who are quads. they cant stand or walk at all.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                  At no time did the MS Society or the Heart & Stroke Foundation or whatever ailment you have you have anything to do with fighting for these spots ... yet they've taken them over.
                  Wow.

                  I guess I'll stop using them, then, since I only have MS, and not a service-related SCI.

                  The whole not being able to walk and using a wheelchair thing must be completely unrelated.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's a dam shame there has to be any arguement over a parking space. I appreciate the folks that fought for the rights for HC parking, the Nam Vets were great to finally get the right.

                    By the same token, anyone with a disability deserves this same right. They could make HC parking available in more than one spot in the lots. Some need to be closer than others, but, one should also be able to feel safe having to cross the parking lot.

                    When I was using the cane, I needed as close to the store as possible and needed the extra large spot to get myself out and situated. In a regular spot I take the chance of beating up someone elses vehicle and getting myself twisted up like a pretzel.

                    Using my chair, it's nice to be close to the store depending on the weather, but I also don't have to worry about getting my chair out, my husband or son does it.
                    But here again, there is no room to get me out and into the chair in a regular spot.

                    My biggest beef is with the folks that have no disabilities and use them. Plus, the bigger stores could provide a little more parking spots.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very much abused.

                      I would have absolutely no problem parking in the spot farthest from the door. I'm certain I can push faster than most can walk. I just don't trust senior citizens driving. So there is no way in hell I am going to push through the whole parking lot & risk my life. Last year we had an incident at the mall an old lady hit a man, killed him & didn't even know it...just kept on driving AND the man was able-bodied. He wasn't sitting in a chair only 3ft tall!
                      Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gurly2356 View Post
                        Very much abused.

                        I would have absolutely no problem parking in the spot farthest from the door. I'm certain I can push faster than most can walk. I just don't trust senior citizens driving. So there is no way in hell I am going to push through the whole parking lot & risk my life. Last year we had an incident at the mall an old lady hit a man, killed him & didn't even know it...just kept on driving AND the man was able-bodied. He wasn't sitting in a chair only 3ft tall!
                        i think you should worry more about the inexperienced teen drivers.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cass View Post
                          i think you should worry more about the inexperienced teen drivers.
                          No way. People always comment that to me on how its the teens. IMO and all my experiences its always the senior citizens. Teenagers have fast reflexes..senior citizens do not.

                          At my last SCI resource meeting there was a lady that came she was in her 60's and had MS. She came to the meeting to talk about hand controls and driving. She had very limited use in her hands and said she could barely turn her steering wheel anymore and her legs didn't have much strength, but yet she drove to the meeting. She joked about how she knows she shouldn't be on the road anymore. People like that I have zero sympathy for they are just as bad as drunk drivers. She knows she can't drive safe she should have called a friend, taxi, city bus or something. I know that is a common thing for senior citizens. There is soooo many that shouldn't be out on the road. If they can afford to put gas in their car, they can afford to buy a bus ticket.
                          Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            are you the mom of a teenager? let me guess...no insult intended...you're early 20's at best?

                            btw, you need only look at the stats.

                            http://www.rmiia.org/Auto/Teens/Teen...Statistics.htm

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traffic_collision

                            http://www.resource4accidents.com/topics/death.html

                            http://www.ntsb.gov/alerts/SA_003.pdf
                            Last edited by cass; 02-07-2010, 12:33 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              true about being dangerous for wheelies in the lot. a person in a chair is hard to see especially in big vehicles that are high up. and about the ole ladys driving across the lot instead of in the lanes. terrible driving in walmart lots. terrible. I am a little put off about the comment of people with ms or heart failer not needing hc parking. I can walk, but with extreme pain and fatigue. I have have sci though. If I used a chair getting to where I need to go, it would be less painful. I am talking walking on steak knives or broken glass. bad bad pain. even so, my two friends with ms cannot get around at all without a powerchair and an attendant. not at all. they have every issue of a high complete quad, but with lots of other goodys added to the suffering.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X