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Quadraplegic athlete decides to end her life

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    #31
    Originally posted by ancientgimp
    If your speaking of the shotgun "assisted suicide" I had no idea it was a movie. It happened at the Jersey Shore Medical Center in 1970, possibly 71.

    .
    Act of Love (1980) (TV)

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      #32
      speaking from an athletes perspective, i would have pulled the plug too. especially that old. just not a life imo, but again thats just me. i respect what she did.
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        #33
        Your thread headline is inflammatory ... .

        William

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          #34
          Liz, thanks for info on "Act of Love" movie. I did a search and screenplay was based on the non-fiction book, "Act of Love: The Killing of George Zygmanik". I was not able to access any in depth articles re the case but apparently there was a trial in NJ in 1973 in which jury nullification took place, in other words they let the brother off for blowing his paralyzed brother away as he lay in a hospital bed. I have ordered a used copy of the book.

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            #35
            wheelchair, how is it inflammatory?

            I'm in agreement with Wesley that she decided to end her life far too soon, in the initial moments really after her injury. I find that very sad, and it does play into the idea that being A QUAD IS UN-ENDURABLE.

            I spent a couple hours with Brian G last night, vent-dependent, vitriolic C-4 quad/SOB (came over to lecture me on MRSA, in hospital gown and gloves), and he's pissed at this story. 'Life's always good', those are his words, 'she quit'.

            I'm a paraplegic, thus I may not be able to comment on what life is at the C level, and yes, it is her choice, but I still find it very sad...
            vgrafen

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              #36
              Life isn't always good, and everyone should have the option and a means to end it (with help, if the person is incapable.) Life can suck.
              Alan

              Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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                #37
                I remember watching the movie Million Dollor Babie, and at the end I thought to myself "man, if I was ever in that situation, I would probably do the same thing. The storyline seemed to be a match.
                If I was meant to have wheels under my ass, what the hell are these legs for?
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                  #38
                  I find this story so very sad. I am an advocate of people being able to make decisions about their own lives, but because she was such a new injury, with no experience or long term psychological help to adjust, it is a decision that I question. Many of us would have opted out those first few days/weeks post injury, and many more of us are glad to have survived it and had a good shot at life, whatever the added burden of disability imposed. I agree with Jeff, this doesn't sit well with me. I wish she had taken more time to find out what might have been possible, especially with what sounds like a loving and supportive (although maybe confused) family at her side.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by fuentejps
                    speaking from an athletes perspective, i would have pulled the plug too. especially that old. just not a life imo, but again thats just me. i respect what she did.
                    I am having a difficult time figuring out how to say this, but do you ever think that maybe your statements could be hurtful to others? Also, as hard as it is for you to believe now, someday (before you know it really) you will be heading into your 60's and probably pissed as hell at some young crip calling you "that old."

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                      #40
                      old? at 65? wth? i know many in their 90's. here we go, they're too old, too disabled, blah blah blah. some hardly need a gentle push down that slippery slope; some never even see it until too late.

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by cass
                        old? at 65? wth? i know many in their 90's. here we go, they're too old, too disabled, blah blah blah. some hardly need a gentle push down that slippery slope; some never even see it until too late.
                        Cass, I'm 64 and have been dealing with a species of this attitude for a while now from a few members who consistently address me with "gramps", "coot" and the like, as though underscoring my age like this is supposed to make me defensive or depressed. It doesn't achieve either but it does make me reflect on what was likely behind these jabs and the most obvious answer is fear and the hope that by so relegating me to the land of "coots" they establish themselves as polar opposites and immune from the eventual ravages of age.

                        Of course age overtakes us all if we live long enough and I can't manage to feel much about this natural process besides a mild pride that I'm still here and fairly autonomous - and very lucky.
                        "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                        J.B.S.Haldane

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                          #42
                          Originally posted by Juke_spin
                          Cass, I'm 64 and have been dealing with a species of this attitude for a while now from a few members who consistently address me with "gramps", "coot" and the like, as though underscoring my age like this is supposed to make me defensive or depressed. It doesn't achieve either but it does make me reflect on what was likely behind these jabs and the most obvious answer is fear and the hope that by so relegating me to the land of "coots" they establish themselves as polar opposites and immune from the eventual ravages of age.

                          Of course age overtakes us all if we live long enough and I can't manage to feel much about this natural process besides a mild pride that I'm still here and fairly autonomous - and very lucky.
                          Considering the age you were injured, and the era in which it happened, you're a f*cking legend.

                          We may not always see eye to eye but I respect that.
                          C5/6 incomplete

                          "I assume you all have guns and crack....."

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                            #43
                            Originally posted by RehabRhino
                            Considering the age you were injured, and the era in which it happened, you're a f*cking legend.

                            We may not always see eye to eye but I respect that.
                            Legend, schmegend but thanks anyway. And I more than respect our differences of opinion; I value them.
                            "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                            J.B.S.Haldane

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                              #44
                              I haven't been to this site in quite a while, but seeing this story this morning in my local paper prompted me to come here to see what responses there would be to this woman deciding to end her life.

                              Just as no two SCIs are alike, no two persons experiences with it are alike. Her age would have worked against her in regaining what she had lost. Although being in the kind of shape she undoubtedly was in may have helped. They neglected to say much about her treatment, so we don't know if she got solumedrol to help.

                              For an athlete, or any person, who's identity is completely linked to their physical side, I can more than understand her making this decision. As others have expressed here, my first thought too was that the decision was made rather hastily. Never the less, she would have had a really tough time due to her age. My husband's case was similar. He was able to get off the ventilator and was lucky enough to have significant return, but he has never adjusted and has been unable to find alternatives to the physical life he once led. He hopes for a heart attack and experiences little joy in the life he once loved and now simply endures.

                              Many here would criticize him for this. Though it is difficult to stand by and watch this, but I have come to accept that it is what it is.

                              I hope she has found peace, and I hope her family does not second guess this decision in the months and years to come.

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                                #45
                                Kittim,
                                I am very sorry your husband feels the way he does, and can only try to imagine how difficult it is for both him to essentially be waiting for death, and for you to have to live with and witness those feelings. Like Juke, I am sometimes surprised at the ageism that goes on within this community, and can't help but wonder if this woman, with her supportive family, could have had a good shot at enjoying what was left of her life despite the injury. I was injured at 17 and had no family support at all, on any front. Not emotionally, not financially, nothing. I spent my days in the hospital trying to make excuses for my parents who did not visit, while crying silently and privately at being alone in one of the worst moment of my life. Maybe the lack of family support pushed me in ways that ultimately helped me to self-advocate and to take control of my own destiny, but that doesn't lessen the pain, then or now, of a family who did not want me. So, I have a very different take on this, on anyone who has supportive family and doesn't understand how lucky they are and how much of a difference it can make. I think her age irrelevant, and anyone who defines themselves as an athlete first is bound for future dissapointment if they live long enough.

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