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Project Walk client featured on Extreme Homemakeover Sun 12/10

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    Project Walk client featured on Extreme Homemakeover Sun 12/10

    December 6, 2006


    Extreme Home Makeover features Project Walk Client

    When: Sunday December 10, 2006 at 8pm on ABC


    Kristina Ripatti is an LA Police Officer who was shot in the line of duty and subsequently suffered a spinal cord injury. We are excited for Kristina and her family because she was chosen to receive a home makeover by the ABC hit program “Extreme Home Makeover”. Kristina’s story airs this Sunday, December 10, 2006 at 8:00pm.

    The SCI community knows all about lifestyle changes after a spinal cord injury but the average person doesn’t understand how it changes everything. Your house was once your home, it was comfortable and safe; it was an extension of you. In an instant, what was once your home is now just a house, it’s no longer friendly. You can’t maneuver around freely; nothing is where you need it; you can’t get into the bathroom, the shower and bath can’t be used; you can’t go upstairs to your bedroom or your child’s. The design is just all wrong now…what do you do? Does insurance help? Does the government have aid for you? Who is going to help make your house a home again?

    The answer is almost always the same--the responsibility is placed on the injured person and their family! Medical bills are in the millions, jobs are lost, income is gone; where is the money for all these necessary lifestyle changes going to come from?

    Please watch Extreme Home Makeover this Sunday. You will see firsthand the modifications needed to make a house a home once again. If you know of anyone in your community that has recently suffered a spinal cord injury, you will now have a better understanding of what the family is going through and how much they need the community to help them get through one of the many obstacles of living with a spinal cord injury.


    Ted & Tammy Dardzinski & the Project Walk staff
    www.projectwalk.org


    Eric Harness, CSCS
    Founder/President
    Neuro Ex, Inc
    Adaptive Performance and Neuro Recovery

    #2
    I thought this was a great episode! Kinda sad that I couldn't afford Project Walk! Looks like an amazing facility. Keep up the good work.
    Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

    Comment


      #3
      Snowman, ya'll are doing a great work, thanks.

      My rugby teamate Darren T, has trained at PW a few times and has seen much improvement.

      They didn't explain about the trac system installed in Kristina's new house, know anything about it?

      Comment


        #4
        I caught the episode also. I thought it was great to see how accessible a house can be made, and it brought a lot of necessary awareness to places like Project Walk and the Life Rolls On Foundation.

        Ms. Ripatti was hurt in the line of duty, which is quite tragic, but it seems like she has a strong support system that will allow her to get through this.

        The only thing that peaked my curiousity was that she looked like she was perhaps a high level para. Why did she need her husband to carry her out of the car and also carry her onto and off of the bed towards the end of the show? He also was pushing her around quite a bit. Perhaps there is something more to her injury that I was not made aware of, but it appeared that she was quite dependant on him. He also said numerous times how hard it had been because he needed to provide a lot of care for his wife so he was unable to look after his daughter. Although I'm a low para, I have friends who have the same level of injury who are a lot more independent than her. I'm curious why it was depicted that she required more help than she actually did? I don't want to sound insensitive and perhaps I don't know exactly what her injury is, so perhaps someone can fill me in.

        I guess my frustration comes from the fact that as good as it is that millions of people tune into this show because it promotes awareness, I also felt that that this episode perpetuated some common misconceptions of individuals with disabilities, especially women and the large viewing audience that does tune into this show will leave with those misconceptions.

        Comment


          #5
          Kiran, I had the same thoughts. Even at a T1 level, I would expect her to be totally independent with her transfers, personal care, ROM, etc. Even her poor skills at going up the ramp on the old house were a surprise given her history of working out and how long she has lived in the house. I was dying to find out where she went through rehab. You would think that LAPD worker's comp would have paid for the best. Even her chair was a clunker for her level of injury.

          I also had some problems with the depiction of PW....and how they defined rehab vs. recovery to the producers, who just took it at their value. Rehab is NOT just about using what is working, but also about teaching adapative techniques, as well as working with what comes back when it does (just like PW). They made it look like the same old story that if you work hard enough you will get return, and that the only reason someone does not get return is lack of will/desire/hard enough work. No mention at all of the vast differences between an ASIA D tetraplegic (depicted working out at PW) and an ASIA A high para.

          The ceiling track system (which looked like overkill to me...who needs it throughout the entire house!!!!) was a Guldmann. A good company, but definately NOT cheap.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Snowman
            December 6, 2006


            Extreme Home Makeover features Project Walk Client

            When: Sunday December 10, 2006 at 8pm on ABC


            Kristina Ripatti is an LA Police Officer who was shot in the line of duty and subsequently suffered a spinal cord injury. We are excited for Kristina and her family because she was chosen to receive a home makeover by the ABC hit program “Extreme Home Makeover”. Kristina’s story airs this Sunday, December 10, 2006 at 8:00pm.

            The SCI community knows all about lifestyle changes after a spinal cord injury but the average person doesn’t understand how it changes everything. Your house was once your home, it was comfortable and safe; it was an extension of you. In an instant, what was once your home is now just a house, it’s no longer friendly. You can’t maneuver around freely; nothing is where you need it; you can’t get into the bathroom, the shower and bath can’t be used; you can’t go upstairs to your bedroom or your child’s. The design is just all wrong now…what do you do? Does insurance help? Does the government have aid for you? Who is going to help make your house a home again?

            The answer is almost always the same--the responsibility is placed on the injured person and their family! Medical bills are in the millions, jobs are lost, income is gone; where is the money for all these necessary lifestyle changes going to come from?

            Please watch Extreme Home Makeover this Sunday. You will see firsthand the modifications needed to make a house a home once again. If you know of anyone in your community that has recently suffered a spinal cord injury, you will now have a better understanding of what the family is going through and how much they need the community to help them get through one of the many obstacles of living with a spinal cord injury.


            Ted & Tammy Dardzinski & the Project Walk staff
            www.projectwalk.org
            I am not so sure I liked the piece. It looked like all her needs were met. No need for a cure. All paralyzed people must have decorator perfect houses. I would ask how many people have all those modifications? You are plugging project walk aren't you? Even that, who knows how helpful it really is. As it turns out, maybe I like Bob Clark's comments. Until you find a way to offer this to everyone shove it. How non profit is it really?

            If it really really worked and only people with funds could afford it I wouldn't mind because eventually it would be available to all. Is it not like a little bit of pampering without much real gain?
            Last edited by bigjoke; 11 Dec 2006, 9:26 PM.

            Comment


              #7
              Think about this. If we are looking for millions of dollars in funding to get results from research that project walk offers now, would we think it was worth it?

              We need results and not more bull

              Comment


                #8
                i didn't understand why her husband was transferring her either. i also didn't agree with the "you can walk again if you just work hard" statements either. There are plenty that bust their asses to walk again and are still wheelin.
                http://official-linerider.com/index.html

                Comment


                  #9
                  It wasn't a good piece for sci. It was a good piece for profiterrers to sell their wares

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                    Kiran, I had the same thoughts. Even at a T1 level, I would expect her to be totally independent with her transfers, personal care, ROM, etc. Even her poor skills at going up the ramp on the old house were a surprise given her history of working out and how long she has lived in the house. I was dying to find out where she went through rehab. You would think that LAPD worker's comp would have paid for the best. Even her chair was a clunker for her level of injury.

                    I also had some problems with the depiction of PW....and how they defined rehab vs. recovery to the producers, who just took it at their value. Rehab is NOT just about using what is working, but also about teaching adapative techniques, as well as working with what comes back when it does (just like PW). They made it look like the same old story that if you work hard enough you will get return, and that the only reason someone does not get return is lack of will/desire/hard enough work. No mention at all of the vast differences between an ASIA D tetraplegic (depicted working out at PW) and an ASIA A high para.

                    The ceiling track system (which looked like overkill to me...who needs it throughout the entire house!!!!) was a Guldmann. A good company, but definately NOT cheap.

                    (KLD)
                    When they were talking about her injury it sounded like it was about the same level as mine (T6), but then they mentioned her excercising her abs, so I'm thinking maybe it was lower.

                    I also thought it was a bit odd that she was athletic but didn't do her own transfers. I wonder if her husband was lifting her to appear more supportive for the show?

                    The PW part bugged me too. They made it sound like if you work hard enough in rehab you're spinal cord will magically heal itself. Like most of us are just too lazy to get walking. The rehab vs. recovery thing seemed a bit sketchy too.

                    I still don't understand exactly what the track system was all about. I thought they said it would get her into a standing position. Is it like a standing frame on a tow-rope or what?
                    De Omnibus Dubitandum

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The thing about these makeover shows is that sometimes the quality of the 'stage' that they are building might be rather questionable. In Chicago one of these show (if not this one) did something like that and it seems the owners are in some sort of lawsuit with the production company for stuff like drier vents going into a bedroom, whirlpool tubs sucking paralysed limbs into the piping or something like that, along with numerious code violations. Either the Daily Herald or the Chicago Tribune did a series of stories a year or two ago about this, search around for it if you are interested.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Myc0

                        They made it sound like if you work hard enough in rehab you're spinal cord will magically heal itself. Like most of us are just too lazy to get walking. The rehab vs. recovery thing seemed a bit sketchy too.
                        This so reminds me (and, I'll bet, a lot of us) of the obnoxious strangers who've just got to start conversations with us in public to let us know about how they once were in a w/c too but were much too determined to remain in it. The clear implication being that either we haven't tried hard enough or we'd be up and out of our chairs or we simply must get our shit together and make the necessary effort.

                        Makes you want to bixch-slap them, well, me anyway. "There! Now if you'd have been trying hard enough, I couldn't have bixch-slapped you." Opps, see, you're still not trying hard enough, are you?
                        "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                        J.B.S.Haldane

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Virtually all ceiling track systems can be fit with a sling that can be used for some suspended gait ambulation, but as an ASIA A she would need to have someone else do the leg movements for her in the absence of a machine like the Lokomat. We use ours in the gym for suspended gait ambulation for those who are incomplete all the time.

                          I did not hear that she wanted it for that...they mostly talked about "being able to get anywhere in the house" (which she can do in her wheelchair now that it is accessible, no??) and being able to get on the floor to play with her child (which most strong people with a paraplegic injury can do by themselves without needing a lift).

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            It's Entertainment

                            Hey, this was made for national TV and the audience, for the majority, was not disabled. Thus, many scenes like hubby helping with transfers. etc., were made for their entertainment value. I do not fault the vendors for making their wares available in the best light available. We use their goods and many of us wish for devices that are out of our reach. Like many of the reality TV shows, "reality" has little do do with the finished product shown. Hum drum lives do not attract sponsors or viewers.
                            You C.A.N.
                            Conquer Adversity Now

                            Comment


                              #15
                              the thing that tingles my mind is wondering about the quality of workmanship on a house being built totally from the ground up in 6/7 days.

                              i was in construction pre-injury and things just don't happen this quick unless it's just THROWED together. and then, theres things such as plumbing pressure has to be checked/inspected, electrical wiring same thing, sheetrock mud takin a day to dry between coats then having to sand it all and so on before you can proceed to the next phase. i know theres like 5000 ppl working day and night but still, they can't stand on each others heads or work over each others shoulder at the same time. what about things going wrong or running out of a certain supply? cutting something wrong, something not fitting, something getting broke. i've never been on construction site where nothing went wrong and it didn't take a day or two to get straightened out, lol. i see a lot of time consuming and meticulous things going into these houses and its nearly impossible to do in this time span, IMHO.

                              just throwin my lil rant in the mix. i like the show though.
                              Last edited by rollin64; 12 Dec 2006, 1:59 PM.

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