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Whadda ya think a concrete ramp for this will cost?

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  • #16
    I should have a ramp or something. My retired carpenter friend told me if I buy the wood the carpenters union would provide the labor for free to build one. It might be the same in your neck of the woods.
    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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    • #17
      Some good info.

      On the garage only access...I kinda want every door to actually work for me, if I'm doing this, might as well not have anything there to annoy me.

      Pro landscaping design...great idea. I was thinking of an irrigation system also. I should note that this particular place sure had some non-pro design, lol. Trees randomly scattered on the lot. Some sort of property line delineation using a few boxwoods (those are some speed demon growth bushes, lol). And it seems just plain odd choices. I think I'd use some sort of columnar conifers for the property line like some Degroot's Arbs, or columnar Junipers. And get rid of the few trees (for clear airspace for a hobby of mine). I do have some ideas for what I want landscape-wise, it would be a hobby of mine. But you definitely can tell when someone didn't have much thought used when doing this

      Wood ramps...I don't like 'em. And I'm shopping stuff that's low and not needing much ramp work also. If I gotta grade, it will be with concrete, not wood due to preference.

      HOA's...if it has one, I'm not buying. I hate that concept. But what I'm thinking is something rural enough so it's cheap, and more likely not to have them in the first place.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Andy View Post
        Some good info.

        On the garage only access...I kinda want every door to actually work for me, if I'm doing this, might as well not have anything there to annoy me.

        Pro landscaping design...great idea. I was thinking of an irrigation system also. I should note that this particular place sure had some non-pro design, lol. Trees randomly scattered on the lot. Some sort of property line delineation using a few boxwoods (those are some speed demon growth bushes, lol). And it seems just plain odd choices. I think I'd use some sort of columnar conifers for the property line like some Degroot's Arbs, or columnar Junipers. And get rid of the few trees (for clear airspace for a hobby of mine). I do have some ideas for what I want landscape-wise, it would be a hobby of mine. But you definitely can tell when someone didn't have much thought used when doing this

        Wood ramps...I don't like 'em. And I'm shopping stuff that's low and not needing much ramp work also. If I gotta grade, it will be with concrete, not wood due to preference. A product like Trex for a ramp is absolutely no maintenance, won't crack, spall or have efflorescence, comes in various colors to blend with the house and landscape, can easily be removed by the next owner, if not needed or wanted.

        HOA's...if it has one, I'm not buying. I hate that concept. But what I'm thinking is something rural enough so it's cheap, and more likely not to have them in the first place.
        I felt the same way you do about having access from all doors, but my wife (an AB) hardly ever uses the front door to come and go and in our situation the front door is just several feet from the door into the garage for access and safety. For us and the way our front door, walkway, driveway is situated it would have meant a major rework of these elements on top of the cost of ramping.

        All the best,
        GJ

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        • #19
          Yep, I like access to all doors to, but wood ramps don't bother me at all if done right.
          "Life is about how you
          respond to not only the
          challenges you're dealt but
          the challenges you seek...If
          you have no goals, no
          mountains to climb, your
          soul dies".~Liz Fordred

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          • #20
            It wasn't exactly your regular HOA. Google Columbia MD. It is a corporation not an actual city or town. It did have a lot of bennies that were very nice for chair users.

            We created a green courtyard in front using dwarf boxwoods. They filled in quickly and as long as they are trimmed correctly every year or so will look terrific for decades. Don't plant too close to walkways. Leave the snow some room on any plants not you. Yea, our place came with compound leaf trees and the county used Siberian elms near curbs and those shed whirlly gigs and smaller branches like crazy. Personally, I'd go for blue spruces over arborvites due to spring winds and summer heat burn but I haven't kept up with improvements in the species. How do you plan on snow removal? Might check out the new fangled heated drives but I'd want to talk to many happy customers before deciding.
            Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

            Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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            • #21
              Actual ramp usage...good point. But still I think I'd want that.

              Snow removal...that would be DIY. I'm thinking I be getting a lawn tractor, and a plow or thrower attachment. I'm actually looking for something with a bigger lot, but that's kind of hard to find with a small slab home that is newer, unless you go into a subdivision of sorts. I'd like to just buy a small farm and build, but that sounds like it would be $$ vs. buying some bubble property.

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              • #22
                If you're going to buy, heat the damn ramp, do you really want to find out if there's ice on it one brisk morning??? set the damn thing on a timer, for a few bucks you can glide down to "the thing that followed me home" without doing a face plant or a fractured hip. Money well spent, and cheaper than insurance/no co-pays need apply.

                Unless you love salt, and ice melt crap, than it's your call.

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                • #23
                  I designed my house and was building before I got in accident. All doors, access points and anything you can think of where wheelchair won't fit I was making extremely wide. It was just what I wanted in design. I never use my front door. I have a wooden ramp in garage that provides me the access in/out of home. Cannot be seen. My guess whoever built that for me cost about $25. Be extremely concerned about any access points where you must use wheelchair. Even something like a walkin closet.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Andy View Post
                    I've been kicking around a weekend home idea. Buy something much like this and adapt it. The front door has a couple steps involved, so that would have to go.

                    Any experiences/costs with having a walkway ripped out and a graded concrete walk installed in its place that you could share?
                    Andy, figure around 3500 to 4000 for tear out and replace. Lose the rails and do a small retaining wall on the right side of your sidewalk for keep your front yard grade the same. Pour the ramp up against the garage it looks like vinyl siding. You could probably remove the siding and put some rubber flashing up pour your sidewalk 4 1/2 ft wide then reinstall siding.
                    Tom

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Quad2004 View Post
                      Andy, figure around 3500 to 4000 for tear out and replace. Lose the rails and do a small retaining wall on the right side of your sidewalk for keep your front yard grade the same. Pour the ramp up against the garage it looks like vinyl siding. You could probably remove the siding and put some rubber flashing up pour your sidewalk 4 1/2 ft wide then reinstall siding.
                      Tom
                      Cool, if this rubber flashing method is code and you do this, I'd leave out the retaining wall. It looks like you only have a foot rise so I would bring the yard up to grade at the ramp with a gentle slope outward and make the damn thing disappear.
                      I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                      • #26
                        We have two ramps, side door is cement, it was only one step but had to remove previous slab and step; back door onto screen porch that we built would have been probably three or four steps and had ramp built with trek and landscaped so that the ramp isn't real noticeable. I had them build the ramp handrail using screws and immediately removed the handrail. the sides of the ramp are two by twelves that stick up an inch or two to prevent running off the ramp. the ramp probably isn't code,length by height, but since Jim uses a power chair it certainly works for us and Dogger had no problems getting up in his manual when he was here. the trek is the same as the screen porch and another porch so it blends well and also shovels well in winter, no slip issues. Many times it's the handrail that can make ramps in attractive and obvious. lAlso safer not to advertise disability if possible. e also had a patio and about thirty foot sidewalk up a steep slope done a few years ago and it cost about $6000 . we are in Wisconsin so the depth is at least six inches and has worked well. W e had about $25000 in accessible remodeling done inside which included four doorways, complete 13 by15 accessible bathroom, u-shaped desk and French doors, oh and new wood floors.The two ramps were included in that pricing.

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                        • #27
                          Then again...I gotta wonder why I'm looking for a Midwest 'retreat'. Why not just move down to Curt's neck of the woods and have something that is already old folks/wheelchair ready, and have better weather? So many decisions, hmm.

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                          • #28
                            Finally. Now you are thinking clearly. You don't have to shovel humidity. For what it is worth I did a ramp twice as high and long in stamped concrete. It was the year 2000. Excellent job! Go for quality not lowest price.
                            "Never argue with an idiot; they'll drag you down to their level and other people may not be able to tell the difference."

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Andy View Post
                              Then again...I gotta wonder why I'm looking for a Midwest 'retreat'. Why not just move down to Curt's neck of the woods and have something that is already old folks/wheelchair ready, and have better weather? So many decisions, hmm.
                              Hmmm Can you out-wheel an alligator? They have both hurricanes and anyplace farm like also has tornadoes but no basements. How much culture do you need? You can probably find something like what you're thinking down state--say, around Decatur or south with a house on it that you can survive in until you build new or renovate. Or over near the U of I or ISU if you still want to drink, eat and watch coeds collect paper money for pole dancing. Hey, relatives, what can I say. Every so often a small farmette goes on sale but any true farm land you're looking at $6,000 an acre in your current state or mine.

                              Maybe time to check out zillow.com
                              Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                              Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Sue Pendleton View Post
                                Hmmm Can you out-wheel an alligator? They have both hurricanes and anyplace farm like also has tornadoes but no basements. How much culture do you need? You can probably find something like what you're thinking down state--say, around Decatur or south with a house on it that you can survive in until you build new or renovate. Or over near the U of I or ISU if you still want to drink, eat and watch coeds collect paper money for pole dancing. Hey, relatives, what can I say. Every so often a small farmette goes on sale but any true farm land you're looking at $6,000 an acre in your current state or mine.

                                Maybe time to check out zillow.com
                                Good points. Just got a wild hare idea after seeing Sequin's pics of CA...reminded me of my pre-SCI traveling days. But yeah, sometimes it's nice to visit, but to actually live there, maybe not. 90+ and 90% humidity I don't think would be so grand.

                                Then there is the current residence, I'd want to be relatively close by and hang onto it, good for an income stream. And I would be uncomfortable handing over operations to a management company and giving them 10% to waste my money. It's not like I'd get a satisfactorily good lump-sum bailing on it either.

                                Also got to thinking that a couple miles east into Indiana would be a better choice, much less shady state economically and politically. Basically sick of Chicago, wish work would force the issue and fire me, as that is the only reason I'm still here, short trip downtown. Transferring elsewhere I doubt would work with the current anti-expensive labor relocations going on there, and I like the nice rut I have going there. Real easy job and the real portion of the company has no idea what we're (not) doing there making things really sweet as far as that goes. So as long as the paychecks keep rolling in, I'll hang out there as much as I'd like to not be there. Gotta keep watching how long I really need to actually work vs. how long I expect to be an oxygen thief. I'd hate to be surprised and live to 80 or so and be broke.

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