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    Accessible oven & cooktop

    Just wondering what you peers think of my new wheelchair accessible cooktop and oven. Do you see anything wrong? Would this be considered accessible under the ADA law?


    #2
    I thought the accessible ones were wheel under cook tops and a wall oven even with your chair so you could reach???

    (I wish I had one but no - Whirlpool electric stove with the dials at the back).
    Last edited by lynnifer; 7 Apr 2013, 12:12 AM. Reason: spelled Whirlpool wrong - all my appliances are the same
    Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

    T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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      #3
      Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
      Just wondering what you peers think of my new wheelchair accessible cooktop and oven. Do you see anything wrong? Would this be considered accessible under the ADA law?
      Would not be considered to be wheelchair accessible by most current standards in the USA, but I don't believe that the ADA regulations apply to private home kitchens. The regulations (not the law) spell out the specific standards for kitchens only in "places of public accommodation".

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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        #4
        nothing "wrong" with it, but it's not as functional as it could be for most wheelchair users.

        some food for thought (written by my wife): http://universaldesign.org/tips/kitchens/appliances

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          #5
          Originally posted by -scott- View Post
          nothing "wrong" with it, but it's not as functional as it could be for most wheelchair users.

          some food for thought (written by my wife): http://universaldesign.org/tips/kitchens/appliances
          Notice your wife didn't say: "Jam the wall oven under the cooktop, screw the user-friendly height."

          What they did was take two accessible appliances and render them both inaccessible. So far the glass for one oven door has been broken and another tenant burned her leg reaching down trying to get something out of the oven.

          Thanks for the link. I will use it to prove my point with management.

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            #6
            Yup.

            Unfortunately the owners of your building likely aren't obligated to make any changes, but a little education certainly won't hurt...

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              #7
              Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
              Just wondering what you peers think of my new wheelchair accessible cooktop and oven. Do you see anything wrong? Would this be considered accessible under the ADA law?

              I know that under current ADA that if it's subsidized housing it would not pass. My son gets involved in these all the time.
              I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                #8
                I've yet to have a oven that's safe for me to use-damn Spina Bifida shortness.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
                  Just wondering what you peers think of my new wheelchair accessible cooktop and oven. Do you see anything wrong? Would this be considered accessible under the ADA law?


                  I'm wondering why the handle on the oven positioned vertically? Please tell me that doesn't mean that the oven opens side ways. If that is the case, it is very dangerous, imo.

                  Also where are the controls to the stove top? Your setup doesn't look safe at all. I hope somebody will listen to you.
                  Last edited by Sugarcube; 7 Apr 2013, 4:14 AM.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Sugarcube View Post
                    I'm wondering why the handle on the oven positioned vertically? Please tell me that doesn't mean that the oven opens side ways. If that is the case, it is very dangerous, imo.

                    Also where are the controls to the stove top? Your setup doesn't look safe at all. I hope somebody will listen to you.
                    The vertical handle would make sense if the wall oven was actually in the wall. A simple pull out below it would allow you to pull hot dishes onto that surface. One of our tenants burned her leg trying to get things out of the oven. And one glass door has been shattered by a wheelchair.

                    The stove's controls are actually conveniently at the front. They are touch sensitive like an iPad. It would be a wonderful stovetop if not for the oven jammed underneath.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                      Would not be considered to be wheelchair accessible by most current standards in the USA, but I don't believe that the ADA regulations apply to private home kitchens. The regulations (not the law) spell out the specific standards for kitchens only in "places of public accommodation".

                      (KLD)
                      This is in a publicly subsidized building. 10 adapted suites, 29 non-adapted suites. Unfortunately they did not take me up on my offer of free advice before it was built.

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