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    which flooring to choose?

    It looks like I am going to be able to have a home built. Yay! One of the questions I have is which flooring material to choose for the majority of the house. I do not have a disability, but my son uses a wheelchair. I also have dogs. Some of the options that have been discussed are:

    1. stained concrete: durable, but can crack. Needs resealing. Hard on my legs (standing and walking on it). I've only seen it in a few homes, but in every case, it was ugly.

    2. vinyl planks: not nearly as durable, so will need replacing, which would be a pain. Easier to walk on. Can scratch and dent. Better looking than vinyl used to be.

    3. ceramic tile: durable, but hard standing and walking on it. Attractive. Grout cleaning ... ugh!

    Any thoughts?

    #2
    I have tile throughout my downstairs. Just spent 3 days cleaning and resealing the grout! We did the stained concrete in my son's house and LOVE IT! If I could do it over again, I would do the stained concrete. He has an older home, one story, with a concrete slab. Yes, it does have some cracks and dings in the floor, but it just adds to the overall character. He chose a charcoal gray as his home is very contemporary with lots of modern art. The floor has a semi-matt finish and the imperfections give it an "edginess" that he really likes. At one time we had hardwood floors in our home and the upkeep was horrendous! If you get a chance, Google "Liquid Dazzle". In my next life, that's what I'm going for!!

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      #3
      Ceramic tile is great. And you can get larger sizes like 20” x 20” in some beautiful patterns and colors. If you don’t like grout then consider tile that has almost no spacing. These tiles fit against each other with only about an eighth inch between. I think some are closer than that. Tile is very good for the “wet” areas, but I consider it a little boring to have everywhere. So try both tile and hardwood together.

      An engineered hardwood floor is especially good to stand or walk on if you float it. The floor is actually installed over a layer of foam so it absorbs a lot of the impact of walking—much easier on the ankles, knees, and feet. Plus with the right combination of wood and tile, I think you’ll agree, it’s anything but boring. As an added bonus, a floating floor can be easily replaced in the future.

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        #4
        I have wood flooring in several rooms which is very attractive and easy to maintain. Also, it's easy to roll on. My son just put in a laminate type floor which also is great looking and easier on a budget. Tile works better in bathroom/ kitchen applications, my opinion.

        Good luck.
        In the dime stores and bus stations, people talk of situations, read books, repeat quotations, draw conclusions on the wall. ......Bob Dylan

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          #5
          I have wood. I am very pleased. My roombo cleans well on the wood and I roll well on the wood. 2 great combinations. Love it.
          DFW TEXAS- T-10 since March 20th, 1994

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            #6
            Wood, engineered planks loosk like plywood planks, or traditional wood flooring. Rolls and feels great.
            I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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              #7
              Wood. Or there is wood laminate, that looks like wood, but is cheaper.

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                #8
                Twenty-two years ago, we had pre-finished, engineered hardwood floors installed in the hallways, family room and kitchen of the home we purchased. In June 2012, we had the floors refinished. We had to move all the furniture out of those areas to prepare for the job. And because of the layout of our home, we had to stay in a hotel for 3 nights. But the refinish is beautiful and probably good for another 20 years. I don't have dogs, but have used manual and power chairs on the floors daily.

                My neighbor has Brazilian Rosewood floors and a Golden Retriever. He had his floors refinished 10 years after installation because the dog's nails really took a toll on the finish.

                Attached are pictures of refinishing job in progress and completed.

                All the best,
                GJ

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                  #9
                  I'm two months into a new vinyl floor. It's great in case of bed bag/leg bag catastrophes. Laminate flooring can suffer damage if you are home alone and cannot clean it up immediately.
                  In the past I've used tile throughout a house I built on slab. It's probably my favorite.

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                    #10
                    i have pergo, tile and carpet. after 16 yrs, my wheelchair and those of friends, 3 dogs, 2 cats, kids running in and out, the only flooring that has had to be replaced is the carpet. and it needs it again. the pergo (wood laminate) and tile still look great.

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                      #11
                      i got pergo also, great stuff and the quality is always getting better.......and i've seen some really nice patterned and stained concrete, some really nice stuff out there......they say cork is nice flooring, also bamboo.........

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                        #12
                        Thanks for all of the replies. Right now I'm leaning towards ceramic tile, even though it is tiring to walk on. I've been told that there are newer grouts that are stain resistant and don't need frequent resealing. Also, I've heard that there are tiles that even look like wood. With my dogs, and my son having toileting accidents, I'm afraid of wood or anything that isn't waterproof. I just don't want to have the floors of my first, and probably only, new house wrecked withing a year.

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                          #13
                          Here is a product I sourced for a recent project: Congoleum Flor-Ever Plus

                          It contains silver, a natural antibacterial that is now used in catheters & Band-Aids. And it looks great with few seams.

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                            #14
                            I have all engineered wood in all woods but 2. The other two rooms are real wood and sealed. My chair causes no damage to either and they both look like real wood. The engineered is just easier to take care of.
                            Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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                              #15
                              I have dark burgendy stained hardwood entire 1st floor but bathrooms. Bathrooms ceramic. Hardwood he need be extremely careful or can damage instantly. Both simple to roll on. You fall, you better be prepared for what it may feel like. Getting up from floor to chair hardwood and ceramic, you basically have very little traction for your own body unless you can provide it some way. Even the chair itself can be moved trying to get back in because there is no weight on it for traction. I suggest you evaluate what kind of surface you would be on most of the time and determine what kind of issues you may have. Floors are not cheap.

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