Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So what does an architect usually cost?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    So what does an architect usually cost?

    I have a hankering for a new house on a slab with all the wheelchair accessible trimmings like no stairs anywhere along with some custom stuff like a hottub in a big wheelchair sized bathroom. I dont think any of the cookie-cutter designs available have stuff like this so I'd have to have a custom plan made up. Anyone have experience with custom house building and how much in general getting plans made up would cost?

    #2
    Don't forget the bulletproof glass. It can be pricey.

    Comment


      #3
      I started with a prefab plan and highly customized it using a cheap, easy to learn program called (I think) 3D Architect. I emailed my drawings and the company sent me back "official" [raised seal stamp] plans with my specifications. I was charged $500 for the drawings.

      I hired a local architect/engineer to do the site plan (concrete and steel raised stilt foundation, setbacks, sewage, elevator shaft and machine room, rainwater runoff calculations, . . .). He charged me $2,500, which was a bit higher than other bids I got. He lived (now deceased) in the next block - a big plus. I think the local fees would be comparable today.

      Some friends in another state hired their trusted neighbor/friend, a big name architect, to design their dream home. He charged them $50,000 to never quite complete the plans for his version of their dream home. They paid, but never built.
      Last edited by Foolish Old; 18 Mar 2012, 11:15 AM.
      Foolish

      "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

      "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

      "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

      Comment


        #4
        For all my building needs, commercial and residential, I have been using a local draftsmen. Much cheaper then an architect.
        T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by flying View Post
          For all my building needs, commercial and residential, I have been using a local draftsmen. Much cheaper then an architect.
          You bring up an interesting point, that being the question of what purpose do the plans serve?

          In my case, I had to have certified plans that attested to the fact that everything complied with the very strict building codes. One requirement is that all structural components can withstand a minimum 155 m.p.h. wind force.
          Foolish

          "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

          "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

          "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

          Comment


            #6
            There no seal/stamp requirement in MI. I've always done my own plans - even for houses I built for others. As long as the plans detail the requirements needed to pass the local building code that's all they care about. Of course you do need to have the code requirements so you can spec out the details on the plan. Engineered joists, beams and trusses require documentation but the supplier of those items generally provides it. Detailed plans of HVAC, dlectrical, and plumbing are generally not required unless it's HUD of other federal involvement.
            One thing my local guys require that is not actually in the code is 1/4'' to 1' scale. I bought a used large format inkjet to print plans. A stupid requirement in the digital age. I work from multiple sheet of 8.5 # 11 laser prints. But by the time I have planned and drawn it I don't really need the prints much anyway.

            Comment


              #7
              Interesting stuff to think about, thanks!

              I'm thinking this would be some prime times to build something...get some short-sale shithole, bulldoze, and build (assuming MERS can actually cough up a clear title, lol). The only sticking point is where I want to live isnt condusive to remaining employed, and chunks 'o land with a house on top that are local to where I need to be still need to de-bubbleize some more.

              Comment


                #8
                Andy, you can PM me but where are you thinking of? We just retired to Madison, WI. I would never live on another slab after Maryland. They get buggy (ok, we had a garden shop with mounds of chip wood to compost that our ants probably came from a block away) and if you stay in the midwest buckling is a real possibilty due to cold. You'll need to decide exactly where the fridge with the ice maker will go along with do you want a gas range and where before pouring. We bought a built home in Maryland and certain things were just too much to change the way we wanted them. This time we also got a condo that is about 10 years old but knew what we needed, wanted and to find out what we could renovate without leveling the entire building. Great price due to the economy here last summer and room, with a designer's eye, for a jacuzzi for me and a roll/walk in huge shower for both of us. Hot tubs/soaking tubs will depend on your abilities and you need to really think about this. I would have drown by now in my first few picks. We closed one door and made it a wall to add even more room in the master bath for great double vanities. Well, let's just say the entire thing has no steps and an elevator down to the basement heated garage a floor below below us. With just 16 units and on a lake...happy.
                About finding a short sale shithole... Do you want to build in that kind of neighborhood? Most short sales are of rather nice places where a bulldoze order might be a problem. But if you think you can find a good place..go for it now. Sales and prices are going up now.
                Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Cost per foot

                  I hired a architect on the request of my general contractor. I hired Mike Brady; yes you know him! He charged $1.50 per square foot. Even though I did 90% of the drawings he had to do the roof loads and made sure everything was up to city code.

                  Many municipalities are requesting an architect approved set of plans before the city approves your plans.

                  One issue I had during construction was Mike dropped a square in for the furnace and a circle for the hot water tank. When it came time to install them we had to move a wall over to make everything fit.

                  Sub-contractors are another story.


                  Ti
                  "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ti, would a hot water on demand unit have fit? The water heater when we moved in was the original and electric. We decided the possibility of a flood before replacing the heater wsn't worth it. We got the HWOD and switched it to gas. We really like it.
                    Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                    Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Sue, so a slab is not good regarding frostlines? I kind of envision some sort of semi-rural property with a junky old place on it. Tear it down and build a one-level place that is completely accessble for maintanance/repair, etc. I do want a big lot so I can play Farmer Brown on a lawn tractor or something, lol. And the space would do good for my other hobbies. But the main thing is one level, right now I have a 3 flat that you can imagine is not too good for a wheelchair. I have a backyard lift for my place, and dragging myself up a flight of stairs to inspect something on another floor isnt too cool. Right now I have a guy that plays building super for a roof over his head, but I'm really thinking of getting out of the income property scene and bail on the city life. Timeframe is TBD...waiting to get laid off still.

                      I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch. Oh yeah, not a lot of rooms for the sake of rooms, real open floorplan.

                      One can dream . The whole sticking point is employment...as long as I have it I'm pretty much stuck here. And doing something like this closer to work is useless IMO as it is downtown, so reasonable seed property would make for a horrendous commute.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Caveat!!! Not all architects understand universal design or designing space with various levels of disability in mind. You may need to do a lot of homework to bring an architect on board with your ideas. Keep that in mind...how much work you have to do to bring the architect up to speed...how much the architect brings to the table...how much the architect is really worth. If you have a great grasp on your needs, codes, and the type of design you are seeking, you may only need a draftsman to alter plans and ideas you like and prefer.

                        All the best,
                        GJ

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Andy View Post
                          I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch.
                          depends how much coin you want to drop... check this...

                          http://www.us.kohler.com/bold-indepe...wAll=false&go=

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by gjnl View Post
                            Caveat!!! Not all architects understand universal design or designing space with various levels of disability in mind.
                            this is true.

                            my wife and I are working on a new project that addresses this very issue.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Andy View Post
                              Sue, so a slab is not good regarding frostlines? I kind of envision some sort of semi-rural property with a junky old place on it. Tear it down and build a one-level place that is completely accessble for maintanance/repair, etc. I do want a big lot so I can play Farmer Brown on a lawn tractor or something, lol. And the space would do good for my other hobbies. But the main thing is one level, right now I have a 3 flat that you can imagine is not too good for a wheelchair. I have a backyard lift for my place, and dragging myself up a flight of stairs to inspect something on another floor isnt too cool. Right now I have a guy that plays building super for a roof over his head, but I'm really thinking of getting out of the income property scene and bail on the city life. Timeframe is TBD...waiting to get laid off still.

                              I tried a hottub in Vegas, I liked the lack of gravity and would like to duplicate that experience. The transfer hight was pretty close to my chair height, and deep/long enough that I could float unlike a regular bathtub. I figure it might be a cool addition, especially when starting from scratch. Oh yeah, not a lot of rooms for the sake of rooms, real open floorplan.

                              One can dream . The whole sticking point is employment...as long as I have it I'm pretty much stuck here. And doing something like this closer to work is useless IMO as it is downtown, so reasonable seed property would make for a horrendous commute.
                              http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatal...n=3&nitem=cat0 Second row, middle. It's not much space but if I had the balance the bubble version would be a dream. And bubbles are easy self cleaning as they blow out when done. A lift is easier to add while building but you don't need it now just plan for it. Good ones are anchored in the above ceiling. Later you can add tracking that is actually kind of sculpture like then medical looking.

                              Yea, deep freeze and slabs don't get along and that slab will settle and in 5 to 10 years you'll be redoing tiles or wood flooring. Actually a realtor friend has seen a lot of laminate on slabs even in Maryland and they tend to warp. Have an emergency basement only with your furnace and stuff in a first floor utility room. With a flip down, emergency battery back up stair ramp to the basement for tornado season you're set for both caring for your utilities and have a safety cubby.

                              Basically you're looking for an estate break up sale? That's when the grandparents left a decent farm in equal parts to their kids and now a kid has died and the grandkids want their cut. Those run 50-200 acreas. Or are you looking for something more like 5 acres in an area that is zoned for residential/small farmette? The first I'd talk to a friend in law and figure out where to find such listings. County Farm Agency types in your state would probably be a good place to start because they know the gossip. Up here I'd head to a BIG real estate company for the first. For the second, time for a road trip. They are turning cornfields into golf courses faster than I ever dreamt possible in the souther counties. I mean my last high school reunion was held in the middle of a place I know I corn detasseled during high school. But there are a lot of small places around the rather picturesque smaller towns we've been exploring with some rather old and decrepit farmhouses on them. If your hobbies include water front on even a creek watch prices rise. We had an Air Force friend who retired to something around maybe 20 acreas over in the Richland Center area. Happy guy until he needed to replace the little bridge over a small creek to get to his place. He had so many state agencies up his butt so nothing got polluted or was less than perfect I was surprised. With Walker in office that has probably changed. Nothing says you can't build a terrific one story out in the pasture land but I wouldn't do it without a basement. My guess is you're less likely to have pipes freeze too. Time to start googling, Dude. I'd start with the slab question. If they will work then try to find a place with a smaller concrete silo as your safety cubby and make it part of the house. Yes, with many of these farms that were split up between a lot of kids you can get a silo on 5 acres on occasion.
                              Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

                              Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X