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    grab bar help

    I need new grab bars for the bathroom. They say grab bars should be 36'' high but that is too high for me. If you are transferring from a manual chair, shouldn't they be lower?

    Also, the wall mounted ones are too far away from the other side of the toilet, and some of the other options seem flimsy.

    What is the best grab bar arrangement for transferring to toilet for a fairly heavy paraplegic?

    #2
    Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
    I need new grab bars for the bathroom. They say grab bars should be 36'' high but that is too high for me. If you are transferring from a manual chair, shouldn't they be lower?

    Also, the wall mounted ones are too far away from the other side of the toilet, and some of the other options seem flimsy.

    What is the best grab bar arrangement for transferring to toilet for a fairly heavy paraplegic?
    I'm not attempting to be non-responsive to your question when I say that you are literally in the best position to make that call. There's no "right" answer, only what works best for you. Listen to everyone, but don't allow yourself to be intimidated by guidelines or "experts".
    Foolish

    "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

    "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

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      #3
      By my understanding grab bars are for pulling yourself up off the toilet if you have trouble standing back up, and that's why the ADA has them.

      For transfers, put them wherever you need them. It's your bathroom, right?

      Comment


        #4
        The thing is, it's not easy to know just where the best spot for things before one tries them out. Also, it's hard to know just from the internet whether specific products are really able to handle daily use by a heavy person.

        I was hoping someone would have configured a sort of ideal toilet grab bar configuration for a heavy paraplegic.

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          #5
          go to some public spaces and see how they have set-up, maybe check out a few hotel rooms(surely they will let you look) and see what they've done. like OldFoolish said, It's your bathroom, do what works for you, the idiots that install them have no clue as they are usually Able bodied people.
          for my toilet, i use a wide bench type commode without the bucket and back bar over the toilet because i had no good place for a grab bar.
          Last edited by jschism; 17 Sep 2010, 4:17 PM. Reason: added

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
            The thing is, it's not easy to know just where the best spot for things before one tries them out. Also, it's hard to know just from the internet whether specific products are really able to handle daily use by a heavy person.

            I was hoping someone would have configured a sort of ideal toilet grab bar configuration for a heavy paraplegic.
            You can look to the ADA guidelines for "ideal" placement. These work for most people. You have already indicated that they aren't "ideal" for you. That's my point about being your own best expert. I put my toilet in a corner with a 36" bar centered behind the toilet and a 30" bar on the right side wall (as viewed when facing toilet, left when seated on toilet). This seems pretty common. You may want to diagonally slant the side wall grab bar.

            Grab bars have weight ratings. Durability and reliability are as dependent on proper installation as they are on construction. Most bars are made pretty good. Shop like you would for anything else. Try to find a vender that seems established. Try to get long (3") lag screws directly into wood studs or blocking.
            Foolish

            "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

            "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

            Comment


              #7
              the problem with hotels is they get the guys installing all the bathrooms to screw on a few grabbars, which is why theyre wildly different. i stayed in toronto a few weeks ago and my first room had the grabbar about 10" from the floor (horizontal) and the second i tried had it set so far forward of the toilet i couldnt even stretch to touch it. places like shopping malls tend to get actual ada installers, but that can be hit and miss too. my one at home is horizontal at more or less elbow height as i sit on toilet. i have a vertical one which runs from about 8" forward of the front of the seat. this is because i do stand and pivot transfers, so i use this bar every single time, cant do without it.

              best thing to do is, as every has said, do whats right for you. it might be an idea to get a couple of suction cup grab bars (theyre not expensive anymore, 20euro for 2 here) and find out what suits you best.

              Comment


                #8
                I have seen grab bars that are on either side of the toilet bowl itself and are not attached to the wall, but attached to a frame that goes around the toilet. Each arm can also be raised for transfers if needed. They are standard issue in Irish airports and are great.

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                  #9
                  yes, everywhere theres an accessible toilet (thats less than us though), same in uk and most of europe. its called a drop rail - check examples here: http://www.benefitsnowshop.co.uk/sho...d=610&area=582

                  its the one area where i feel the ada falls short. ada public toilets, while plentiful, have 1 grabbar. in europe, as a legal matter, we have 3 - 2 horizontal, on each side of the toilet, at least 1 of which is hinged, and 1 vertical.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    It probably could go without saying, but you must screw the grab bars into wall studs or into additional blocking between the studs behind the drywall. Molly bolts, nails, or screws into sheetrock are not adequate. "Cats" 2-by-4s or 2-by-6s that you nail in between the studs.
                    If you find that you don't have the blocking or the studs where you want them securely, Moen makes a "Secure Mount" system for grab bars that holds them securely at 1500 lbs - static pressure.
                    "The popularity of SecureMount Grab Bars is not limited to the quality and design - but the utmost ease in installation. The SecureMount Installation System features a unique innovative D-shaped Anchor that makes it possible to quickly, easily and securely install a grab bar anywhere on the wall, with one stud or no studs - in less than 10 minutes. Since no studs are necessary, homeowners or installers save time, materials and labor: simply drill a hole in the wall, install the Anchor system and mount the grab bars.

                    "The SecureMount Anchor's unique design reduces the most common concerns of conventional grab bar installation, including liability concerns, as well as the time and money it takes to complete such a job," remarked Crozier.

                    To ensure the grab bar installation is secure, independent testing was conducted by CSA and NAHB laboratories to exceed ADA, ASTM, ANSI and CSA standards. In addition, the SecureMount anchors held up to 1,500 pounds during static load testing when installed in 5/8-inch drywall with marble. The Anchors can also be installed into fiberglass tub wall surrounds as thin as 1/8 inch in thickness as well as a variety of additional substrates including marble, tile, drywall and fiberglass up to 1 ½ inches thick - without requiring studs or costly blocking."

                    http://www.spacecraftersclosets.com/...e_Products.pdf

                    Grab bars with a Peened (machined to feel gritty, but not sharp) finish are preferable. Peened finish grab bars provide a safer grip if the bar gets wet and does not carry the risk of tearing delicate skin that "diamond grip" or "sure grip" grab bars do. Other considerations are the diameter of the grab bar and the gauge of the steel. In your application, I would go with 16-18 gauge stainless steel and 1 1/2 inch diameter.

                    All the best,
                    GJ

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I agree - Bars are too high!

                      Hey

                      I have been running into these same issues - where I work, restaurants, hotels... EVERYWHERE.

                      I looked into it and the ADA regulation specifies that the bars MUST be 37 inches from the ground! I have a genetic disease that caused me to have a spinal fusion. In addition to that, I have muscle weakness so doing pull-ups with a 37 inch grab bar is not a possibility for me. It is nice to know I'm not alone. I wonder who we could talk with regarding this ADA regulation??

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