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    Funding for a home elavator?

    Does medical/medicaid fund for home elevators?
    My brother has a developmental disabilty and uses a wheelchair. We recently were awarded a Habitat for Humanity home and since the bedrooms will be upstairs a home elevator needs to be installed. The construction team can't continue with building our home because we need the funds for the elevator. Any information will be appreciated.
    Thanks
    - OSCAR

    #2
    No, Medicaid (Medi-Cal) does not pay for home modifications or access equipment (ramps, elevators, etc.), and neither does Medicare. HFH is supposed to make the house wheelchair accessible if that is needed. One reason I don't donate to them is their continued failure to make ALL of their houses visitable. Ask them to help you find a charity that might help.

    DOR/DVR pays for home modifications in some states, but not in CA.

    You would probably have to hold a fund raiser for this. Can you work with your church? You should cost out both elevators and stair lifts.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
      No, Medicaid (Medi-Cal) does not pay for home modifications or access equipment (ramps, elevators, etc.), and neither does Medicare. HFH is supposed to make the house wheelchair accessible if that is needed. One reason I don't donate to them is their continued failure to make ALL of their houses visitable. Ask them to help you find a charity that might help.

      DOR/DVR pays for home modifications in some states, but not in CA.

      You would probably have to hold a fund raiser for this. Can you work with your church? You should cost out both elevators and stair lifts.

      (KLD)
      My brother also receives services through The Regional Center, which is an organization that serves children and adults with developmental disabilities here in California. We are going to approach them about this.
      What do you mean by HFH's continued failure to make the homes visitable?
      - OSCAR

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        #4
        There is no doubt that Habitat for Humanity does wonderful work--New Orleans is a good example. However, to interpret what SCI-Nurse said, Habitat for Humanity has been approached numerous times by people with disabilities and other disability advocates to build their homes with accessibility in mind. Habitat for Humanity continues to ignore the requests of MANY to make thier homes accessible--or visitable--by all people including the able-bodied or those living with disabilities. Their refusal to consider this request doesn't make any sense as everyone knows it is easier and more cost effective to design accessibility into the home as it is being constructed. I don't know what the circumstances are with the lot or the codes in the area where your brother's home is being built. It would make sense to build the home as a ranch or one level to avoid the expense of an elevator. Or, if the home has to be a two story, to build the home with bedroom, bath, kitchen, living area on the main floor. Habitat for Humanity doesn't respond to alternative designs and suggestions. Everyone who lives with a disability knows cookie cutter homes just don't suffice. Habitat for Humanity doesn't "get" this fact!

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          #5
          Habitat for Humanity is a wonderful organization!
          My family and I feel blessed that we were awarded this home.
          We now live in a two bedroom apartment where is not wheelchair accessible at all. We have tried looking into other apartments but all seem to be the same and moving out anywhere else is expensive. Homeownership here in California, specially in the valley, is VERY expensive. HFH will do their best to make the home accessible, otherwise they wouldn't award a home to a family with a disabled child if they couldn't meet the family's needs. All I know is that we are going to a better living situation and to homeownership. And if they don't build one level-homes is because land here in Los Angeles is scarce and not because they don't want to modify the home for a person with a disabilty. We live in a VERY expensive and safe neighborhood where three bedroom homes start at $500K. People just don't appreciate.
          - OSCAR

          Comment


            #6
            Not that I'm recommending, but once when I was in the market for a house I went through the home of another chair user. There was a closet in bedroom when you opened the door there was an elevator which his friends had hooked up. It worked off an electric engine hoist mounted above the elevator. He used it to access the family room/basement. Obviously this was completely out of code and met no safety regulations.

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