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  • STEMPAC: It's Time to Fight Back!!!!!

    http://www.stempac.com/


    For Immediate Release

    StemPAC Launched to Fight for Stem Cell Research; Aims to Rally Grassroots Support , Hold Accountable Elected Federal and State officials

    July 12, 2005

    Contact: John Hlinko
    John@StemPAC.com

    Washington, DC – In an effort to wage a national campaign against extremist elected officials who have been holding up stem cell research, a bipartisan team of industry leading grassroots mobilizers, political consultants, and private sector stem cell research supporters today officially launched “StemPAC.” StemPac, anchored by its namesake web site StemPac.com, is a 527 organization that will unite and mobilize pro-stem cell research activists and millions of Americans who are clamoring for the United States to take a leadership role in stem cell research.

    “StemPac will hold accountable any elected or appointed official who holds up the promise of stem cell research based on their own personal ideology or outright ignorance,” explained John Hlinko, a leader of the effort, and VP at the political consulting firm Grassroots Enterprise. “The will of the majority has been ignored, hope for millions with debilitating illnesses has been needlessly delayed, and this promising industry of the future is being gradually outsourced to other nations with each passing day. It’s time to fight back.”

    In coming weeks, StemPAC plans to aggressively work on behalf of pro-stem cell legislation being considered right now in the U.S. Senate (H.R. 810 specifically, without amendment – see www.StemPAC.com for details). Thereafter, it plans to go on the offense, fighting for stem cell funding on the federal level, and for more sensible regulations and legislation in the states as well.

    Although StemPac officially launches today, its website has been live since late May. In the mere six weeks since StemPac.com went live it has already become one of the highest trafficked websites in support of stem cell research, has spurred thousands of letters to President Bush and members of Congress, and collected hundreds of stories from real life Americans with Cancer, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, spinal cord injuries, and other conditions for which stem cell research holds promise (see www.StemPAC.com for stories, sortable by state and city).

    The StemPaC Team

    The StemPAC team is headed by John Hlinko, who helped lead MoveOn.org in its early days, and who founded and led DraftWesleyClark.com, a shoestring effort that engaged tens of thousands of supporters, gained national media attention, and raised nearly $2 million in pledges for a Wesley Clark candidacy.

    National Democratic strategist and award-winning media consultant Bud Jackson (www.jacksongroupmedia.com) has also been retained as a Stem Pac team member. Jackson will produce paid media on behalf of StemPac, including television advertising targeting stem cell research opponents.

    The rest of the core team includes:

    Kevin McCann: Founder of the Fair Deal for Newfoundland campaign
    Allyson Kapin: Online marketing specialist, who has worked with a range of national activist organizations
    Sabrina Cohen: Associate Director of the Genetics Policy Institute
    The core team is being assisted by a range of advisors, including:

    Scientists, such as Evan Snyder of the Burnhan Institute;
    Grassroots visionaries, including Markos Moulitsas Zuniga, the founder of DailyKos.com;
    Longtime political professionals, such as Bill Romjue;
    Patient advocates, including Frank L. Cocozzelli;
    For more information on the StemPAC team and advisors, please see www.StemPAC.com.
    Last edited by Faye; 07-19-2005, 11:46 PM.

  • #2
    My personal interest is in finding a cure for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes. My
    now 15 year old daughter was diagnosed almost 5 years ago. So far, she has
    pricked her fingers approximately 11,000 times, and has taken about 7,500
    insulin injections. If she had cancer, she could hope to be cured – or at
    least to go into remission so she wouldn't need 4 or 5 or 6 insulin shots
    every day just to stay alive. Right now, all we can hope for is that she
    doesn't have a heart attack or a stroke, that she doesn't go blind, that
    her kidneys keep working and that her feet and legs don't have to be amputated.

    Now, let me tell you about the economics of diabetes. Diabetics test their
    blood sugar levels at least four times a day – children with type 1
    juvenile diabetes test more like 6 to 8 times a day. These little test
    strips that are used to measure blood glucose levels cost, conservatively
    and on average, 70 cents per strip. Diabetics who test their blood glucose
    level just 4 times per day (breakfast, lunch, dinner, bedtime) are spending
    Two Dollars and Eighty Cents per day, or a little over a thousand dollars a
    year, minimum, on these strips. That's over a billion dollars per year for
    every 1 million diabetics, and there are an estimated 17 million people
    suffering from diabetes in the US alone.

    Next, I am going to review the financial's from the 2003 and 2004 Annual
    Reports of Eli Lilly & Company, one of the major producers of insulin.
    Before I do, I want to remind you that insulin will never cure diabetes. It
    is what my 15-year-old refers to as her 'lifeline'. It keeps a diabetic
    alive, but does not prevent the catastrophic side effects. And it will
    never cure anyone!

    2003: "Our worldwide sales…increased 14%, to 12.58 billion dollars."
    Sources of revenue: "Diabetes care products, composed primarily of
    Humulin…Humalog…and Actos…had aggregate worldwide revenues of 2.57
    billion dollars." Ladies and gentlemen, 20% of the worldwide sales were
    from 3 products, 2 of which (Humulin and Humalog) are for 'maintenance' of
    type 1 diabetics. In 2003, Humulin sales in the US were 507.5 million
    dollars, and were 658.6 million dollars for Humalog.

    The 2004 numbers are equally staggering. The same three products had
    aggregate worldwide revenues of 2.61 billion dollars. Humulin sales in the
    US were only 422.7 million, but Humalog sales in the US were up to 685.4
    million dollars. An explanation offered by Eli Lilly is (and this is a
    direct quote!) "Humalog sales in the US increased 3 percent as increased
    prices offset slight volume declines."

    That's 5.18 billion dollars in a two-year period – to treat patients who
    will not get better. That's a whole loot of insurance and medicare dollars
    going to two drugs to maintain a condition for which there actually might
    be a cure.

    Breakthroughs using stem cell therapies have been announced all over the
    world, and involving many conditions, such as reversing the side effects of
    diabetes, curing type 1 juvenile diabetes, restoration of immune systems in
    cancer patients, improvement of a Parkinson's patient's motor skills by
    83%, reversal of heart tissue damage in a heart attack victim, the list
    goes on and on. Stem cells work, and more research is needed.


    This is not a religious issue. This is a health issue. This is a "where are
    my Medicare dollars going?" issue is a quality of life issue Even though
    the dollars are huge, let's not forget that the main benefits from stem
    cell research and therapies are to improve the health and to save the lives
    of millions who suffer, or who may in the future suffer from diseases that
    could be treated or cured with new stem cell therapies. We are talking
    about improvement of the quality of a human life!

    B. Cole



    ATTENTION STEM CELL RESEARCH SUPPORTERS





    Have you ever noticed how many Republicans, starting with President Bush, claim to be against Stem Cell Research because of the moral and ethical considerations? Have you noticed how they are fixed on 'embryonic' stem cell rather than admitting the successes of adult stem cells?



    Let me shed some light on why they have taken this position. In addition to Eli Lilly telling me that it would never support anything that would ever cure diabetes, and admitting that 20% of its 12 billion dollars in revenue in 2003 came from the sale of insulin (diabetes has been reversed in other countries), look at all of the campaign contributions made by the pharmaceuticals to our elected officials:





    Pharmaceutical Manufacturing:
    Top 20 Recipients


    Election cycle: 20042002200019981996199419921990

    List Top 20: All RecipientsPresidential CandidatesSenatorsMembers of the HouseSenate CandidatesHouse CandidatesAll Members of Congress

    Rank

    Candidate

    Office

    Amount

    1
    Bush, George W (R)

    Pres
    $499,549
    2
    Kerry, John (D)

    Pres
    $275,888
    3
    Burr, Richard (R-NC)

    Senate
    $196,148
    4
    Ferguson, Mike (R-NJ)

    House
    $180,899
    5
    Specter, Arlen (R-PA)

    Senate
    $120,700
    6
    Hastert, Dennis (R-IL)

    House
    $116,500
    7
    Gregg, Judd (R-NH)

    Senate
    $106,000
    8
    Dodd, Chris (D-CT)

    Senate
    $100,525
    9
    Bond, Christopher S 'Kit' (R-MO)

    Senate
    $83,503
    10
    Barton, Joe (R-TX)

    House
    $79,750
    11
    Bennett, Robert F (R-UT)

    Senate
    $78,000
    12
    DeLay, Tom (R-TX)

    House
    $76,999
    13
    John, Chris (D-LA)

    Senate
    $74,468
    14
    Lieberman, Joe (D-CT)

    Senate
    $73,000
    15
    Bayh, Evan (D-IN)

    Senate
    $72,022
    16
    Johnson, Nancy L (R-CT)

    House
    $71,250
    17
    Martinez, Mel (R-FL)

    Senate
    $69,050
    18
    Simmons, Rob (R-CT)

    House
    $67,436
    19
    Isakson, Johnny (R-GA)

    Senate
    $66,099
    20
    Frelinghuysen, Rodney (R-NJ)

    House
    $64,602








    Notice how many Republicans are listed above?







    Send to Democratic Party!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Stem Cell
      My personal interest is in finding a cure for Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes. My
      now 15 year old daughter was diagnosed almost 5 years ago. So far, she has
      pricked her fingers approximately 11,000 times, and has taken about 7,500
      insulin injections. If she had cancer, she could hope to be cured – or at
      least to go into remission so she wouldn't need 4 or 5 or 6 insulin shots
      every day just to stay alive. Right now, all we can hope for is that she
      doesn't have a heart attack or a stroke, that she doesn't go blind, that
      her kidneys keep working and that her feet and legs don't have to be amputated.

      ATTENTION STEM CELL RESEARCH SUPPORTERS

      Have you ever noticed how many Republicans, starting with President Bush, claim to be against Stem Cell Research because of the moral and ethical considerations? Have you noticed how they are fixed on 'embryonic' stem cell rather than admitting the successes of adult stem cells?
      This is not true. The very first thing republicans always say is that adult stem cells have cured many conditions. But you are right that even adult stem cells do not get adequate funding, and you are right that the pharmaceutical companies do not want there to be a cure. Even health improvements from laseracupuncture are looked on with disdain because it may mean less medication purchased for uti's etc.
      Personally my family and I stay away from doctors and the american healthcare system. My son Jason(15) became paralyzed due to medical malpractice, after he developed a bloodclot due to a collision with another soccer player.
      I'm keeping my eye on So.Korea, where big pharma doesn't have such a huge influence. My biggest fear remains that discoveries are bought and shelved by big pharma.

      Comment


      • #4
        “thank You Dr. Frist For Your Courageous Decision”

        For Immediate Release:

        STEMPAC STATEMENT ON SENATOR FRIST’S DECISION TO SUPPORT HR 810;

        “THANK YOU DR. FRIST FOR YOUR COURAGEOUS DECISION” ANNOUNCES END TO “DON’T FILIBUSTER HOPE” TV AD, BEGINS “THANK YOU, DR. FRIST” CAMPAIGN

        July 29, 2005

        Contact: John Hlinko

        John@StemPAC.com

        202-744-6525


        Washington, DC

        – StemPAC, the highest trafficked web site in support of stem cell research and a newly launched 527 organization uniting pro-stem cell activists, today praised Senator Bill Frist’s decision to support HR 810, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act (HR 810). StemPAC also announced that it would not extend the airing of its TV ad calling on Frist to not “Filibuster Hope.” The ad began running in New Hampshire this week, in response to Frist’s earlier opposition to HR 810.


        “This is a huge victory for the stem cell movement, and for all Americans. Senator Frist looked at the scientific evidence, looked into his heart, and made an extremely courageous decision to back HR 810,” said John Hlinko, founder of StemPAC. “As stem cell activists, and indeed as Americans, we need to thank Dr. Frist – and we need to work even harder to call upon other members of Congress and the President to join Dr. Frist and the overwhelming majority of Americans who support stem cell research, and the hope it offers.”


        (see www.StemPAC.com for Senator Frist’s statement on HR 810)


        In response, StemPAC announced that it would halt plans to extend the run of its current ad, and it would also cease production of additional ones targeted at Senator Frist.


        StemPAC also launched a “thank you Dr. First” letter writing campaign, and is asking its supporters to email and call Dr. Frist to express their gratitude and support.






        (See www.StemPAC.com for more on the “thank you Dr. Frist” effort)






        “This represents a giant leap forward in hope for me and the 128 million Americans like me who could potentially benefit from stem cell research,” said Sabrina Cohen, co-leader of StemPAC, Associate Director of the Genetics Policy Institute, and a quadriplegic as a result of a car accident at age 14.


        However, the group vowed to maintain its vigilance in the fight for 810, and for stem cell research in general.


        “This is but one battle in a long fight,” said Allyson Kapin, co-leader of StemPAC. “We will continue to do whatever we can to build a grassroots army in support of stem cell research, and to hold accountable those elected officials who refuse to listen.”

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank Dr. Frist

          Here's the latest StemPAC newsletter... exciting stuff indeed...

          --------------------------------------------------
          WOW! Frist to SUPPORT Stem Cell Research Bill!

          In a word -- WOW. This may be the single most exciting day of the
          StemPAC effort. Earlier this week, we told you that StemPAC had
          begun running a TV ad in New Hampshire, taking on Senator Frist for
          blocking HR 810, the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act. We asked
          for your donations to air it, and you responded -- big time.

          Well, miracles happen -- if you work for them. We are happy to
          report that Senator Frist announced today that he has rethought his
          position, and will now support HR 810. (get the details) This is
          huge, and it takes the bill's chance of passage in the Senate
          from "almost nil" to "very likely." Accordingly, we are taking down
          our NH ads. Pat yourself on the back -- and then get back to work,
          because we need more miracles.

          The battle is not over. The vote itself will not take place in the
          Senate for a few weeks. In the meantime, the anti stem cell
          extremists have already begun attacking Senator Frist, and are
          desperately trying to get him to switch his position. And we can be
          sure that others in the Senate will take extreme steps to derail the
          bill. In short, we've had a great victory today, and gained a key
          ally -- but our work is not done. Here's what we all need to do:


          Thank Senator Frist: Send him a thank you note now at
          http://www.stempac.com. Regardless of whether you're a Democrat,
          Republican, or "other," one thing should be clear -- what Senator
          Frist did today took an incredible amount of courage. Yes, we need
          to aggressively hold accountable those who oppose stem cell
          research, but we also need to recognize those who are willing to do
          the right thing. Senator Frist will be hearing from a lot of
          people on the other side, including some who are just plain creeps.
          He needs to hear from us as well. Take a second, and thank Senator
          Frist.

          Keep supporting StemPAC: Your dollars funded the ads in New
          Hampshire -- and your dollars will be needed to continue this fight.

          http://www.stempac.com/donate/

          Comment


          • #6
            Join the "Google Hit Squad"

            The StemPAC Google hit count is now up to 20,4000 (www.stempac.com/google/). This is truly astonishing growth -- 10,000% growth in just two months -- and shows we are catching up on the grassroots front.

            Remember, visit www.stempac.com/google/, join the "Google Hit Squad" and keep the hits coming.

            Yes, yes, I know tracking Google hits is geeky, but remember -- every hit on the web is another chance for people to see our message, get educated on stem cells, and take action to further research.

            Keep it coming, folks, keep it coming....
            www.stempac.com/google/

            Comment


            • #7
              dubya's phone # in latest stem pac ad!!!!

              Tue, August 9th: Call the White House -- Join the National "Cell-a-Thon!"



              Dear rob:

              The Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research (CAMR) has planned a coordinated effort to show the President our support for embryonic stem cell research, and for H.R. 810 in particular.

              Please join StemPAC and about a zillion other advocacy organization, and help us flood the White House with phone calls on TUESDAY, August 9 -- the fourth anniversary of President Bush's stem cell policy announcement! It just takes a few seconds -- so do it!

              CALL TO ACTION:

              Call President Bush (202-456-1414) and ask him to

              "SIGN H.R. 810 INTO LAW WHEN THE BILL PASSES THE SENATE"

              You can also leave a message on the White House comment and suggestion line at 202-456-1111.

              Remember:

              1) Embryonic stem cell research has the potential to treat and better understand a host of diseases such as Parkinson's, juvenile diabetes, spinal cord injuries, heart disease, autoimmune diseases, Alzheimer's, and ALS.

              2) Polling data shows that embryonic stem cell research is supported by a majority of Americans.

              3) It is the will of over 100 million Americans who suffer from chronic and debilitating diseases and their families to see this legislation become law.

              Please share this with your friends and family -- remember, we need a FLOOD of calls.

              Thanks!

              The StemPAC Team
              www.StemPAC.com





              Unsubscribe
              rob

              Comment


              • #8
                New 527 Jolts Stem-Cell Debate

                August 8, 2005

                By Emily Pierce, Roll Call Staff

                Group Plans to Wield Carrots, Sticks on Divisive Issue

                There’s a new kid on the block in the battle over embryonic stem-cell research, and it’s threatening to make the debate less about the science of the issue and more about the political ramifications for lawmakers who oppose broad federal funding of the controversial studies.

                StemPAC, a group formed in May of this year but officially launched in July, is headed by John Hlinko, a Democratic political activist and founder of the "Draft Wesley Clark" presidential effort, along with a team of like-minded strategists, including media consultant Bud Jackson of the Jackson Group. Liberal Web logger Markos Moulitsas Zuniga of dailykos.com sits on its advisory board.

                The group aims to be more aggressive than groups already on the landscape, officials said.

                "We want to sort of be the bulldog in the yard," said Jackson in an interview. "We want to apply political pressure. ... We thought there was a vacuum out there and that there was a way to do this smarter."

                Despite its infancy, StemPAC made a media splash the week of July 25, when it announced plans to run ads criticizing Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist’s (R-Tenn.) apparent opposition to stem-cell research, including his reluctance to bring a broad House-passed stem-cell research bill to the Senate floor before the August recess.

                The ad was to have run in New Hampshire, where Frist would have to campaign if he is going to run for president in 2008 as is rumored. It would have criticized Frist for supporting the "outsourcing" of biomedical research jobs.

                However, StemPAC pre-empted the first airing of the commercials when Frist announced on July 29 that he supported passage of the House bill, following weeks of reports that he was working with nervous conservatives to come up with an alternative measure that could siphon votes away from the House measure during any Senate consideration.

                Hlinko and Jackson acknowledged that the ad buy in New Hampshire wasn’t going to involve much money, but added that the planned rolling media buy would have aired the ad 250 times in four days on ABC news programs, starting the Friday night of Frist’s announcement. Indeed, the mere announcement that StemPAC would begin airing ads resulted in $200,000 in donation pledges to the group.

                Once Frist shifted his position, the group changed tactics to running ads on liberal Web logs that thanked Frist for his "courage" in breaking with President Bush’s opposition to more embryonic stem-cell research. In fact, the StemPAC Web site generated 1,500 thank-you e-mails to Frist in the first 24 hours after his July 29 announcement, Hlinko said.

                Frist’s apparent change of heart is considered significant because it may prompt other wavering Republicans to buck Bush. The president does not support any changes to his policy of allowing federal funding for embryonic stem-cell research only on a handful of lines created before Aug. 9, 2001. Frist and other critics noted those lines are contaminated and cannot be used for successful human disease therapies.

                Hlinko said the group will push to create a national grass-roots movement dedicated to pressuring wavering lawmakers to support stem-cell research on embryos from fertility clinics that would be destroyed or discarded anyway. Most anti-abortion conservatives oppose such research because they consider it the destruction of a nascent human life.

                Hlinko said StemPAC will use both carrot and stick, spending most of its energy working to defeat lawmakers in the 2006 midterm elections rather than just supporting lawmakers who have voted for or back stem-cell research.

                "Whoever the biggest roadblocks are, we will target them," said Hlinko, adding that Democrats and Republicans alike could be targets.

                StemPAC’s tactics differ significantly from other pro-research groups, such as the Republican Main Street Partnership and the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research, to name but a few.

                CAMR, for example, is comprised of doctors, researchers and patients’ rights groups that have more at stake before Congress than just research on embryonic stem cells, said spokesman Sean Tipton.

                CAMR’s member organizations "are inherently conservative in how they operate. It’s important for these organizations to have good relationships throughout the Congress," explained Tipton.

                Meanwhile, RMSP has run ads in a number of states hoping to influence wavering House and Senate lawmakers, but their ads have avoided naming the targeted politician for fear of upsetting GOP leaders in Washington. Instead, the ads simply explain what they see as the promise of stem-cell research to cure myriad of diseases and ask citizens to call Congress.

                It was RMSP members, such as Reps. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) and Mike Castle (R-Del.), who secured a deal with House GOP leaders to have the initial vote on the House stem-cell measure despite the party leadership’s distaste for it.

                Hlinko said that many people are advocating for stem-cell research, but few are taking a hard political line or trying to build a grassroots effort that can compete with the already massive grass-roots anti-abortion effort.

                "One thing that is not happening is lots and lots of people sending e-mails to Members of Congress and making phone calls," he said.

                Plus, tying the controversial outsourcing issue, which has become a concern for New Hampshire voters, to the stem-cell debate was a way of bringing these decisions home to both lawmakers and constituents, Jackson said.

                Still, the political bent of StemPAC worry some stem-cell research advocates. They fear that aggressive moves by the group could harm the delicate bipartisan balance required to pass the House bill in Congress.

                "We don’t think it’s helpful if the debate becomes too overtly partisan," said one such advocate, who requested anonymity. The advocate added that the fact that StemPAC’s entire organization is made up of Democratic partisans could pose trouble for the stem-cell movement.

                Hlinko said he understands why some may be concerned, but said his interest in the issue if more personal than partisan, given that his nephew was recently diagnosed with Tay-Sachs disease, an incurably fatal genetic disorder, but for which many researchers believe stem-cell research could provide a therapy.

                "The proper thing to do is to be aggressively bipartisan and also be aggressive in getting the grassroots out," said Hlinko, who added that it was a conscious decision to feature Republican stem-cell research supporters, such as Frist, Sen. Orrin Hatch (Utah), and former first lady Nancy Reagan, on their Web site.

                Besides, the first presidential campaign he worked on was for Ronald Reagan, he notes.

                "I’m not as liberal as people think," he said.

                Still, StemPAC’s targets will more often than not be Republicans, given that the GOP is home to a sizable majority of anti-abortion conservatives.

                Indeed, Jackson noted that Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.), who is up for re-election this year, would "definitely be a target" for StemPAC.

                "He’s in a tough election where we can play and probably make a difference," Jackson said.

                Hlinko said that while StemPAC is new, it has already "made a large Internet footprint very quickly." Hlinko boasts that the StemPAC Web site is the most visited pro-stem-cell research site on the Web, measured by Alexa.com Web rankings.

                Though the group is called StemPAC, Hlinko and Jackson said they are currently organized as a 527 political group, named for the section of the Internal Revenue Service code under which they organize, rather than as a traditional political action committee.

                Still, Jackson said they would likely create an actual PAC in the future in order to run ads close to election dates. Current campaign finance laws prohibit 527s and other "soft-money" groups from running ads within 30 days of a primary or 60 days of a general election. PACs that use traceable hard money can run ads up until Election Day.
                Last edited by Faye; 08-09-2005, 08:53 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  this group got my donation/support, as they do seem very well organized, pro-active, have top notch talent at the reins, and are broad based enough to pull in support from a lot of cell advocates/get the required critical mass to make cell technology a political entity to be respected...

                  IMO, this type of effort is also well positioned to take on the extremists and put cell technology on solid ground.... It's not just SCI on the line here w/cell research, we're all in this together as humans trying to help humans....
                  rob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rvr
                    this group got my donation/support, as they do seem very well organized, pro-active, have top notch talent at the reins, and are broad based enough to pull in support from a lot of cell advocates/get the required critical mass to make cell technology a political entity to be respected...

                    IMO, this type of effort is also well positioned to take on the extremists and put cell technology on solid ground.... It's not just SCI on the line here w/cell research, we're all in this together as humans trying to help humans....
                    Thank you rvr!

                    Unfortunately most on CC have been rather conservative in their advocacy, though I'm still hopeful to meet more CC folks like you and I who want to approach the Stem Cell Research issue as aggressively as the anti-abortionists take on their issue. Stem Cell Research is a Life and Death issue that should stir a passion like nothing else. Everyone, please become a Stem Cell Research Activist!

                    Faye
                    Last edited by Faye; 08-11-2005, 12:41 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Faye,

                      Honest question. Other than Geron (who pre-differentiate their cells), what groups have shown that ESCs can be used to cure paralysis?
                      ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Steven,

                        Many studies have reported that embryonic stem cells or cells derived from embryonic stem cells are beneficial in animal models of spinal cord injury or motoneuronal degeneration. John McDonald's, Doug Kerr's, and Hans Keirstead's work, and several others have published on the subject. I list a sampling for your perusal.

                        One of the major problems is that most spinal cord injury studies are done in rats. We still don't know how to make embryonic stem cells from rats. Therefore, the only sources of embryonic stem cells that people have used are mouse and human. These xenografts of course require long-term immunosuppression.

                        There are many papers reporting beneficial effects of embryonic stem cell transplants in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer models, retinopathies, liver disease, diabtes models, etc., etc. I am surprised that politicians like Weldon and others have been saying that there is no evidence that embryonic stem cell therapies have had any therapeutic benefits. All they have to do is to have their staffers to a Medline search for embryonic stem cells and any currently incurable disease.

                        Wise.


                        Chen J, Bernreuther C, Dihne M and Schachner M (2005). Cell adhesion molecule l1-transfected embryonic stem cells with enhanced survival support regrowth of corticospinal tract axons in mice after spinal cord injury. J Neurotrauma 22: 896-906. Previous studies have indicated that the cell adhesion molecule L1 enhances neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. L1-mediated promotion of neurite outgrowth has been shown to occur also in an inhibitory environment not only in vitro, but also in vivo. To further investigate the effects of L1 in spinal cord injury, we transfected embryonic stem cells with a plasmid encoding the full-length mouse L1 molecule under the control of PGK promoter. An embryonic stem cell line derived from C57BL/6J transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein under control of the beta-actin promoter was transfected with L1 and injected into the lesion site of 3-month-old C57BL/6J female mice 7 days after compression injury. Non-transfected embryonic stem cells were detectable at the lesion site 3 days after transplantation, but lost their cellular integrity 7 days after transplantation and were barely detectable 1 month after transplantation. In contrast, L1-transfected embryonic stem cells were detected 1 month after transplantation in numbers comparable to those of the injected cells and demonstrated extended processes. Further, in contrast to the few detectable nontransfected stem cells that remained at the injection site 1 month post-transplantation, the L1-transfected embryonic stem cells had migrated rostrally and caudally from the lesion. Anterogradely labeled corticospinal tract axons showed interdigitation with L1-transfected embryonic stem cells and, in contrast to non-transfected stem cells, extended into the lesion site 1 month after transplantation and, in some cases, extended beyond it. Our observations encourage the use of L1-transfected embryonic stem cells that express L1 not only at the cell surface, but also as a soluble and secreted form. Their use could condition the inhibitory environment for homophilic L1-enhanced axon regrowth not only in spinal cord regeneration, but also in other lesion paradigms. Zentrum fur Molekulare Neurobiologie, Universitat Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16083356


                        Sykova E and Jendelova P (2005). Magnetic resonance tracking of implanted adult and embryonic stem cells in injured brain and spinal cord. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1049: 146-60. Stem cells are a promising tool for treating brain and spinal cord injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive method to study the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. We studied implanted rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) labeled with iron-oxide nanoparticles (Endorem(R)) and human CD34(+) cells labeled with magnetic MicroBeads (Miltenyi) in rats with a cortical or spinal cord lesion. Cells were grafted intracerebrally, contralaterally to a cortical photochemical lesion, or injected intravenously. During the first week post transplantation, transplanted cells migrated to the lesion. About 3% of MSCs and ESCs differentiated into neurons, while no MSCs, but 75% of ESCs differentiated into astrocytes. Labeled MSCs, ESCs, and CD34(+) cells were visible in the lesion on MR images as a hypointensive signal, persisting for more than 50 days. In rats with a balloon-induced spinal cord compression lesion, intravenously injected MSCs migrated to the lesion, leading to a hypointensive MRI signal. In plantar and Basso-Beattie-Bresnehan (BBB) tests, grafted animals scored better than lesioned animals injected with saline solution. Histologic studies confirmed a decrease in lesion size. We also used 3-D polymer constructs seeded with MSCs to bridge a spinal cord lesion. Our studies demonstrate that grafted adult as well as embryonic stem cells labeled with iron-oxide nanoparticles migrate into a lesion site in brain as well as in spinal cord. D.Sc., Institute of Experimental Medicine ASCR, Videska 1083, 140 20 Prague 4, Czech Republic. sykova@biomed.cas.cz. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15965114


                        Jendelova P, Herynek V, Urdzikova L, Glogarova K, Kroupova J, Andersson B, Bryja V, Burian M, Hajek M and Sykova E (2004). Magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted bone marrow and embryonic stem cells labeled by iron oxide nanoparticles in rat brain and spinal cord. J Neurosci Res 76: 232-43. Nuclear magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides a noninvasive method for studying the fate of transplanted cells in vivo. We studied, in animals with a cortical photochemical lesion or with a balloon-induced spinal cord compression lesion, the fate of implanted rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Endorem). MSCs were colabeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), and ESCs were transfected with pEGFP-C1 (eGFP ESCs). Cells were either grafted intracerebrally into the contralateral hemisphere of the adult rat brain or injected intravenously. In vivo MR imaging was used to track their fate; Prussian blue staining and electron microscopy confirmed the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles inside the cells. During the first week postimplantation, grafted cells migrated to the lesion site and populated the border zone of the lesion. Less than 3% of MSCs differentiated into neurons and none into astrocytes; 5% of eGFP ESCs differentiated into neurons, whereas 70% of eGFP ESCs became astrocytes. The implanted cells were visible on MR images as a hypointense area at the injection site, in the corpus callosum and in the lesion. The hypointense signal persisted for more than 50 days. The presence of GFP-positive or BrdU-positive and nanoparticle-labeled cells was confirmed by histological staining. Our study demonstrates that both grafted MSCs and eGFP ESCs labeled with a contrast agent based on iron oxide nanoparticles migrate into the injured CNS. Iron oxide nanoparticles can therefore be used as a marker for the long-term noninvasive MR tracking of implanted stem cells. Institute of Experimental Medicine Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15048921

                        Keirstead HS, Nistor G, Bernal G, Totoiu M, Cloutier F, Sharp K and Steward O (2005). Human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplants remyelinate and restore locomotion after spinal cord injury. J Neurosci 25: 4694-705. Demyelination contributes to loss of function after spinal cord injury, and thus a potential therapeutic strategy involves replacing myelin-forming cells. Here, we show that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into adult rat spinal cord injuries enhances remyelination and promotes improvement of motor function. OPCs were injected 7 d or 10 months after injury. In both cases, transplanted cells survived, redistributed over short distances, and differentiated into oligodendrocytes. Animals that received OPCs 7 d after injury exhibited enhanced remyelination and substantially improved locomotor ability. In contrast, when OPCs were transplanted 10 months after injury, there was no enhanced remyelination or locomotor recovery. These studies document the feasibility of predifferentiating hESCs into functional OPCs and demonstrate their therapeutic potential at early time points after spinal cord injury. Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Reeve-Irvine Research Center, College of Medicine, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4292, USA. hansk@uci.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15888645


                        Kitagawa A, Nakayama T, Takenaga M, Matsumoto K, Tokura Y, Ohta Y, Ichinohe M, Yamaguchi Y, Suzuki N, Okano H and Igarashi R (2005). Lecithinized brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes the differentiation of embryonic stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 328: 1051-7. The addition of lecithin molecules to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been reported to markedly enhance its pharmacological effect in vivo. In the current study, we show that lecithinized BDNF (PC-BDNF) has a higher affinity than BDNF for neural precursor cells. Although BDNF only slightly increased the expression of the genes for Mash-1, p35, 68 kDa neurofilament, and TrkB receptor, PC-BDNF caused a significant increase in their expression. PC-BDNF also increased the level of neurofilament protein and dramatically increased TrkB mRNA gene expression, which was followed by a sustained activation of the p42/p44 extracellular-regulated kinases. Finally, transplantation of PC-BDNF-treated cells was more effective than BDNF-treated cells at improving impaired motor function caused by spinal cord injury. These findings showed that PC-BDNF has a better potential than BDNF for promoting neural differentiation, partly due to a higher cellular affinity. Furthermore, PC-BDNF-treated cells could be useful for transplantation therapy for central nervous system injuries. Department of Frontier Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki 216-8512, Japan. akikit@marianna-u.ac.jp http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15707984


                        Grumbles RM, Casella GT, Rudinsky MJ, Godfrey S, Wood PM and Thomas CK (2005). The immunophilin ligand FK506, but not the P38 kinase inhibitor SB203580, improves function of adult rat muscle reinnervated from transplants of embryonic neurons. Neuroscience 130: 619-30. Injury to the adult CNS often involves death of motoneurons, resulting in the paralysis and progressive atrophy of muscle. There is no effective therapy to replace motoneurons in the CNS. Our strategy to replace neurons and to rescue denervated muscles is to transplant dissociated embryonic day 14-15 (E14-15) ventral spinal cord cells into the distal stump of a peripheral nerve near the denervated muscles. Here, we test whether long-term delivery of two pharmacological inhibitors to denervated muscle, FK506 or SB203580, enhances reinnervation of muscle from embryonic cells transplanted in the tibial nerve of adult Fischer rats. FK506, SB203580 (2.5 mg/kg) or saline was delivered under the fascia of the medial gastrocnemius muscle for 4 weeks, beginning when muscles were denervated by section of the sciatic nerve. After 1 week of nerve degeneration, one million E14-15 ventral spinal cord cells were transplanted into the distal tibial nerve stump of each rat in the three treatment groups. Ten weeks later, all cell transplants had neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) positive neurons. Neuron survival and axon regeneration were similar across treatments. An average (+/-S.E.) of 210+/-66, 100+/-36 and 176+/-58 myelinated axons grew distally from the cell transplants of rats with muscles treated with FK506, SB203580 or saline, respectively. Regenerating axons in muscles of all three treatments groups were detected with antibodies against phosphorylated neurofilaments and synaptophysin, and motor end plates were labeled with alpha-bungarotoxin. Muscles of rats that received transplants of media only had no axon growth, indicating that the muscles were denervated. The mean muscle fiber areas of rats that received cell transplants and had long-term delivery of FK506, SB203580 or saline to muscles were significantly larger than those of denervated muscle fibers. Thus, cell transplantation reduced muscle atrophy. Transplantation of embryonic cells also resulted in functional muscle reinnervation. Electromyographic activity and force were evoked from >90% of the muscles of rats with cell transplants, but not from denervated muscles. FK506-treated muscles were significantly more fatigue resistant than naive control muscles. FK506-treated muscles also had significantly stronger motor units than those in SB203580 or saline-treated muscles. These data suggest that a pathway regulated by FK506 improves the function of muscles reinnervated by embryonic neurons placed in peripheral nerve. The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Lois Pope Life Center, 1095 NW 14th Terrace (R48), Miami, FL 33136, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15590146


                        Harper JM, Krishnan C, Darman JS, Deshpande DM, Peck S, Shats I, Backovic S, Rothstein JD and Kerr DA (2004). Axonal growth of embryonic stem cell-derived motoneurons in vitro and in motoneuron-injured adult rats. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101: 7123-8. We generated spinal motoneurons from embryonic stem (ES) cells to determine the developmental potential of these cells in vitro and their capacity to replace motoneurons in the adult mammalian spinal cord. ES cell-derived motoneurons extended long axons, formed neuromuscular junctions, and induced muscle contraction when cocultured with myoblasts. We transplanted motoneuron-committed ES cells into the spinal cords of adult rats with motoneuron injury and found that approximately 3,000 ES cell-derived motoneurons (25% of input) survived for >1 month in the spinal cord of each animal. ES cell-derived axonal growth was inhibited by myelin, and this inhibition was overcome by administration of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or a Rho kinase inhibitor in vitro and in vivo. In transplanted rats infused with dbcAMP, approximately 80 ES cell-derived motor axons were observed within the ventral roots of each animal, whereas none were observed in transplanted rats not treated with dbcAMP. Because these cells replicate many of the developmental and mature features of true motoneurons, they are an important biological tool to understand formation of motor units in vitro and a potential therapeutic tool to reconstitute neural circuits in vivo. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Pathology 627C, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15118094


                        McDonald JW, Becker D, Holekamp TF, Howard M, Liu S, Lu A, Lu J, Platik MM, Qu Y, Stewart T and Vadivelu S (2004). Repair of the injured spinal cord and the potential of embryonic stem cell transplantation. J Neurotrauma 21: 383-93. Traditionally, treatment of spinal cord injury seemed frustrating and hopeless because of the remarkable morbidity and mortality, and restricted therapeutic options. Recent advances in neural injury and repair, and the progress towards development of neuroprotective and regenerative interventions are basis for increased optimism. Neural stem cells have opened a new arena of discovery for the field of regenerative science and medicine. Embryonic stem (ES) cells can give rise to all neural progenitors and they represent an important scientific tool for approaching neural repair. The growing number of dedicated regeneration centers worldwide exemplifies the changing perception towards the do-ability of spinal cord repair and this review was born from a presentation at one such leading center, the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center. Current concepts of the pathophysiology, repair, and restoration of function in the damaged spinal cord are presented with an overlay of how neural stem cells, particularly ES cells, fit into the picture as important scientific tools and therapeutic targets. We focus on the use of genetically tagged and selectable ES cell lines for neural induction and transplantation. Unique features of ES cells, including indefinite replication, pluripotency, and genetic flexibility, provide strong tools to address questions of neural repair. Selective marker expression in transplanted ES cell derived neural cells is providing new insights into transplantation and repair not possible previously. These features of ES cells will produce a predictable and explosive growth in scientific tools that will translate into discoveries and rapid progress in neural repair. Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=15115588


                        Kerr DA, Llado J, Shamblott MJ, Maragakis NJ, Irani DN, Crawford TO, Krishnan C, Dike S, Gearhart JD and Rothstein JD (2003). Human embryonic germ cell derivatives facilitate motor recovery of rats with diffuse motor neuron injury. J Neurosci 23: 5131-40. We have investigated the potential of human pluripotent cells to restore function in rats paralyzed with a virus-induced motor neuronopathy. Cells derived from embryonic germ cells, termed embryoid body-derived (EBD) cells, introduced into the CSF were distributed extensively over the rostrocaudal length of the spinal cord and migrated into the spinal cord parenchyma in paralyzed, but not uninjured, animals. Some of the transplanted human cells expressed the neuroglial progenitor marker nestin, whereas others expressed immunohistochemical markers characteristic of astrocytes or mature neurons. Rare transplanted cells developed immunoreactivity to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and sent axons into the sciatic nerve as detected by retrograde labeling. Paralyzed animals transplanted with EBD cells partially recovered motor function 12 and 24 weeks after transplantation, whereas control animals remained paralyzed. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that the efficiency of neuronal differentiation and extension of neurites could not account for the functional recovery. Rather, transplanted EBD cells protected host neurons from death and facilitated reafferentation of motor neuron cell bodies. In vitro, EBD cells secrete transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Neutralizing antibodies to TGF-alpha and to BDNF abrogated the ability of EBD-conditioned media to sustain motor neuron survival in culture, whereas neutralizing antibodies to BDNF eliminated the axonal outgrowth from spinal organotypics observed with direct coculture of EBD cells. We conclude that cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells have the capacity to restore neurologic function in animals with diffuse motor neuron disease via enhancement of host neuron survival and function. Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287, USA. dkerr@jhmi.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12832537


                        McDonald JW and Howard MJ (2002). Repairing the damaged spinal cord: a summary of our early success with embryonic stem cell transplantation and remyelination. Prog Brain Res 137: 299-309. Demyelination contributes to the loss of function consequent to central nervous system (CNS) injury. Optimizing remyelination through transplantation of myelin-producing cells may offer a pragmatic approach to restoring meaningful neurological function. An unlimited source of cell suitable for such transplantation therapy can be derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are both pluripotent and genetically flexible. Here we review work from our group showing that neural precursor cells can be derived from ES cells and that transplantation of these cells into the injured spinal cord leads to some recovery of function. We have further examined and optimized methods for enriching oligodendrocyte differentiation from ES cells. ES cell-derived oligodendrocytes are capable of rapid differentiation and myelination in mixed neuron/glia cultures. When transplanted into the injured spinal cord of adult rodents, the neural-induced precursor cells are capable of differentiating into oligodendrocytes and myelinating host axons. The role of myelination and remyelination will be discussed in the context of regeneration strategies. Center for the Study of Nervous System Injury, Spinal Cord Injury Restorative Treatment and Research Program, Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. mcdonald@neuro.wustl.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=12449097


                        Liu S, Qu Y, Stewart TJ, Howard MJ, Chakrabortty S, Holekamp TF and McDonald JW (2000). Embryonic stem cells differentiate into oligodendrocytes and myelinate in culture and after spinal cord transplantation. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97: 6126-31. Demyelination contributes to the loss of function consequent to central nervous system (CNS) injury. Enhanced remyelination through transplantation of myelin-producing cells may offer a pragmatic approach to restoring meaningful neurological function. An unlimited source of cells suitable for such transplantation therapy can be derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are both pluripotent and genetically flexible. In this paper we show that oligodendrocyte cultures can be reliably produced from retinoic acid-induced ES cells and that these oligodendrocytes can myelinate axons in vitro. Methods were further developed for generating highly enriched cultures of oligodendrocytes through an additional culturing step, producing an intermediate "oligosphere" stage. To test whether ES cells can survive, migrate, and differentiate into mature myelin-producing cells in areas of demyelination in the adult CNS, ES cells were transplanted into the dorsal columns of adult rat spinal cord 3 days after chemical demyelination. In the demyelination site, large numbers of ES cells survived and differentiated primarily into mature oligodendrocytes that were capable of myelinating axons. Furthermore, when oligosphere cells were transplanted into the spinal cords of myelin-deficient shiverer (shi/shi) mutant mice, the ES cell-derived oligodendrocytes migrated into the host tissue, produced myelin and myelinated host axons. These studies demonstrate the ability of ES cell-derived oligodendrocytes to myelinate axons in culture and to replace lost myelin in the injured adult CNS. Transplantation of ES cells may be a practical approach to treatment of primary and secondary demyelinating diseases in the adult CNS. Center for the Study of Nervous System Injury, and Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Box 8111, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10823956

                        McDonald JW, Liu XZ, Qu Y, Liu S, Mickey SK, Turetsky D, Gottlieb DI and Choi DW (1999). Transplanted embryonic stem cells survive, differentiate and promote recovery in injured rat spinal cord. Nat Med 5: 1410-2. Transplantation approaches using cellular bridges, fetal central nervous system cells, fibroblasts expressing neurotrophin-3 (ref. 6), hybridoma cells expressing inhibitory protein-blocking antibodies, or olfactory nerves ensheathing glial cells transplanted into the acutely injured spinal cord have produced axonal regrowth or functional benefits. Transplants of rat or cat fetal spinal cord tissue into the chronically injured cord survive and integrate with the host cord, and may be associated with some functional improvements. In addition, rats transplanted with fetal spinal cord cells have shown improvements in some gait parameters, and the delayed transplantation of fetal raphe cells can enhance reflexes. We transplanted neural differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells into a rat spinal cord 9 days after traumatic injury. Histological analysis 2-5 weeks later showed that transplant-derived cells survived and differentiated into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons, and migrated as far as 8 mm away from the lesion edge. Furthermore, gait analysis demonstrated that transplanted rats showed hindlimb weight support and partial hindlimb coordination not found in 'sham-operated' controls or control rats transplanted with adult mouse neocortical cells. Center for the Study of Nervous System Injury, the Restorative Treatment and Research Center and Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, Box 8111, 660 S. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. mcdonald@neuro.wustl.edu http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=10581084

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wise Young
                          Steven,

                          Many studies have reported that embryonic stem cells or cells derived from embryonic stem cells are beneficial in animal models of spinal cord injury or motoneuronal degeneration. John McDonald's, Doug Kerr's, and Hans Keirstead's work, and several others have published on the subject. I list a sampling for your perusal.
                          Thanks for the response Wise. I was hoping more for a listing of studies where undifferentiated ESC transplants restored recovery.

                          I completely agree that ESCs can be used to generate cells that can be used to restore significant function after injury. But it is those generated cells that restore the function, and not the ESCs, which is a point I often fail to see mentioned.

                          I saw the L1-ESC abstract yesterday and am looking forward to reading the full study.
                          ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Faye
                            Thank you rvr!

                            Unfortunately most on CC have been rather conservative in their advocacy, though I'm still hopeful to meet more CC folks like you and I who want to approach the Stem Cell Research issue as aggressively as the anti-abortionists take on their issue. Stem Cell Research is a Life and Death issue that should stir a passion like nothing else. Everyone, please become a Stem Cell Research Activist!

                            Faye
                            well, not so sure I'd like to be lumped in w/THAT lot - killing doctors and blocking access to med facilities/refusing to fill prescriptions/terrorist tactics are simply wrong for any cause/reason, IMO but I think I know what you mean - apathy/whining doesn't help/get results... IMO, passion is ok, but reason and clear thought are probably more effective tools (in a business/social context)

                            IMO, there are a couple of fronts to be addressed:
                            1) cell research in general (ESC/ASC/schwan/etc) we simply need to test them all and see what works best.. HR810 happens to be hot, so what the heck, if ESC works, great - if not, approving/funding other cell stuff will be easier compared to the antichrist of cell technology... it's got momentum, so I say let's jump on and see where it goes....
                            2) NIH involvment/leadership in cell technology - having states do their own thing is nuts/wasteful as each state will have to forge through all the issues on their own...
                            3) funding/fast tracking of trials - again, IMO the NIH could make a huge impact on the quality and quantity of trials w/some tweaking.... CRPA portions in HR 5213 (signed into law in 2004) actually address this, but seem to need a push...

                            IMO, if we can get more orgs to join forces and focus on these broader issues, there's simply a LOT more critical mass, hence better chances of action - I suspect that's why HR 810 is so hot (not just esc for sci), and why HR 5213 passed unaminously... IMO, CRPA or any other neuological affliction bill alone is a tougher sell... doesn't mean we should give up though....
                            rob

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              rvr, 5213 actually got shelved by an anonymous Senator shortly after CR's death... reportedly because CR was too outspoken on stem cells. A good amount of outrage surrounded that.

                              Originally posted by rvr
                              3) funding/fast tracking of trials - again, IMO the NIH could make a huge impact on the quality and quantity of trials w/some tweaking.... CRPA portions in HR 5213 (signed into law in 2004) actually address this, but seem to need a push...
                              You might want to take a look at the Roadmap for Medical Research and the Neuroscience Blueprint, including GENSAT.

                              GENSAT is an ambitious project to map the expression (activity) of thousands of genes in the brain and spinal cord. By understanding when and where specific genes are active, we can better understand how these genes contribute to the development and functioning of the nervous system. As part of the GENAT project, scientists are genetically engineering strains of mice that produce visible fluorescent signals wherever and whenever a particular gene is expressed. Blueprint support of GENSAT is enabling the development of an extensive database of gene expression data and the distribution of the mouse strains generated by GENSAT. The feasibility of expanding GENSAT to include analysis of the eye, ear, and pain pathways is also being explored.
                              A good bit of tweaking is being done to (hopefully) make things better.
                              Last edited by Steven Edwards; 08-11-2005, 03:22 PM. Reason: corrected a typo
                              ...it's worse than we thought. it turns out the people at the white house are not secret muslims, they're nerds.

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