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    "I didn't know this was going on"

    In regard to the film "Crip Camp" - the documentary about a group of teenagers who became leaders in disability civil rights, and also the book "Being Heumann" by Judith Heumann, disabled activist and leader for decades, it seems there is growing awareness on the part of the general non-disabled public. I have had several people comment to me after seeing the film and/or reading the book: "I didn't know this was going on". There's even an entire YouTube video of a guy expressing this. I'm hoping this awareness will spread to employers who interview anyone with a disability, to health care workers, to teachers, etc., etc.

    I just read an article by Joseph Shapiro, in the New York Times, 7/17/2020: "Disability Pride: The High Expectations of a New Generation". The article is about disabled persons who grew up under the ADA which turned 30 this month, and how they are still facing issues.
    My wish is that we begin to see more disabled individuals in the media - tv ads and film - depicting the normalcy of their "different" daily life. Maybe we'll see more products and advances in science and technology. For instance, I don't think the general public has a clue that there is ongoing research into spinal cord injury.
    Ok, that's my rant for the day.


    #2
    Just curious about this.....does anyone have non-disabled family members or friends who saw the documentary film Crip Camp, and made comments to you about it?
    Just wondering what kind of comments, if any.
    I have heard that the film may be on the Oscar list of nominees for best documentary.
    If you have Netflix streaming, it's on there.

    Comment


      #3
      Not one person family or otherwise has ever mentioned it to me. Not sure what that says.
      "Never turn your back on fear. It should always be in front of you, like a thing that might have to be killed." - Hunter Thompson
      T5/6 complete

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        #4
        Thanks for your comment. I was curious about this as I come from a large family and only recently a nephew of mine saw the film and asked me about my activities as my husband and I are in a couple of brief scenes in the Crip Camp film, the part that shows the demonstrations in 1972.

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          #5
          personally we make corporations to much money for them to fix us just my thougths

          Comment


            #6
            Can you explain further? Sorry, I'm not understanding the comment.
            Thanks....

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by triumph View Post
              Can you explain further? Sorry, I'm not understanding the comment.
              Thanks....
              I REALLY need to work on my writing. i feel the reason we are not fixed cured whatever term used is we are cash cows. everything we use it so costly . same with insulin and cancer ..



              Comment


                #8
                Understand your point. Just wondering if you saw the film Crip Camp about how the disabled activists got laws passed to help disabled persons. Do you think it's worth fighting for affordable health care and equipment?

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                  #9
                  no i did not see i just do not watch tv or films give me a book yes i do as it nuts that drugs health care everuthing is so expensive no no iam not for health care for all . i think healthcare has gotten out of control because people don/t pay so people with ins are paying for the one that don/t don/t get me started on that.we used to go to dr office we paid out of pocket same insurance was mainly for hospital

                  Comment


                  • SCI-Nurse
                    SCI-Nurse commented
                    Editing a comment
                    You obviously know nothing about the two "Medicare for All" bills (one in the Senate, the other in the House).
                    EVERYONE who is a USA resident would be insured. There would no longer be any private insurance companies. No co-pays, no deductibles, and you can choose your own providers and hospitals. No prior authorizations: if your doctor orders it, it is paid for (with very few exceptions). Your ability to access and pay for healthcare should NOT be dependent on you being employed as it is now. As a PWD, you should understand this better than most.

                  #10
                  Hey, Triumph. My rant is that corporations with humongous advertising dollars and advertising agencies
                  that produce tv commercials do not have the courage to portray us in our normalness in their adverts. Wimpier than the wimpiest.

                  And That’s
                  Howie Dooitt





                  .
                  You C.A.N.
                  Conquer Adversity Now

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by vjls View Post
                    no i did not see i just do not watch tv or films give me a book yes i do as it nuts that drugs health care everuthing is so expensive no no iam not for health care for all . i think healthcare has gotten out of control because people don/t pay so people with ins are paying for the one that don/t don/t get me started on that.we used to go to dr office we paid out of pocket same insurance was mainly for hospital
                    no i don/t but i am not a fan of free health care as it not free we are paying for it people must be responable for their wel being. . i also think that insurance is 1 reason cost are so high like. i firmly believe things are inflated

                    Comment


                    • SCI-Nurse
                      SCI-Nurse commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Well, we differ there. I think health care is a human right, and should not be denied those who cannot afford it, are unemployed, disabled, or otherwise don't have a job. Medicare 4 All will not be "free" as it will be paid for by taxes and fees that are less than what most people & employers pay now in premiums. There will be no health insurance companies any more. They and the for-profit nature of Big Health Care now days are the reason that our health care is the most expensive in the world, but also one of the poorest in quality and health outcomes.

                      (KLD)

                    #12
                    Well, we differ there. I think health care is a human right, and should not be denied those who cannot afford it, are unemployed, disabled, or otherwise don't have a job. Medicare 4 All will not be "free" as it will be paid for by taxes and fees that are less than what most people & employers pay now in premiums. There will be no health insurance companies any more. They and the for-profit nature of Big Health Care now days are the reason that our health care is the most expensive in the world, but also one of the poorest in quality and health outcomes.

                    (KLD)

                    I believe similarly but don't go as far as calling healthcare a 'human right'. It's definitely an obligation of a modern, capable, and functional society, not to allow a lack of means to determine access to healthcare. To do so is simply immoral, IMO. But I don't believe it's "a right" because providing healthcare is someone else's labor. I don't believe we have a "right" to anyone else's labor. People always have a right to choose not to be a healthcare provider. Saying it's a "right" opens up a can of worms filled with questions like, "If no one wants to be a doctor, are those who have the capacity, but choosing not to, violating other's 'human rights'?" And, "Can a government ethically use their monopoly on the legitimate use of force to compel healthcare providers to labor?" Or, "If a healthcare provider quits their job, are they violating 'human rights' by no longer providing care?" Or, "Is any and all care conceivably possible, regardless of prognosis, mandated else human rights are being violated?" (Are there any limits?!)

                    I think the term "human right" was chosen as intentionally hyperbolic, to make a powerful sound bite, but that it has many implications that are more obviously morally sound when reserved for things like the limits on what a government can do to it's citizens, rather than making "human rights" claims we can make to other people's labor.
                    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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