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Eating right to avoid deep vein thromboses

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    Eating right to avoid deep vein thromboses

    People with spinal cord injury are at a high risk of getting deep vein thromboses even when they are not flying. However, this interesting article is about how airlines are changing the food they are serving: lower fat, salt, and sugar... higher fiber. Interesting.

    http://www.airlinemeals.net/
    Headline news of June 14, 2007
    Read news overview for other news

    Eat wisely, fly safely
    Looking forward to that long-haul holiday? Just make sure that you move around and eat and drink the right things to reduce the risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    If you add a meal rich in saturated fat into the mix, the problem may intensify, because saturated fats raise the levels of blood-fats after eating, which activates a substance called Factor 7 — a central component of the blood-clotting mechanism.

    Many airlines have responded by offering lighter food options — indicated by their Well-Being symbol — which include dishes lower in fat, salt and sugar and higher in fibre (BA does this).

    #2
    Interesting, it definetely seems like airline food has gotten better in the last few years, more choices too. I've managed to get upgraded to business class on several occasions (pre-sci) and the entire experience including the food & wine was great! Also alot easier to walk around on long flights.

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      #3
      Thanks Wise. Didn't know that foods could affect clotting.

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        #4
        That is interesting...the food looks palatable too.

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          #5
          Daily aspirin can be helpful.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Le Type Français
            Daily aspirin can be helpful.
            Ah, which reminds me that there are blood thinning herbs out there that mimic coumadin (a prescription blood thinner) and aspirin, a salicylate. This is provided for information only. Not suggesting that folks take them. I have chamomile, fenugreek and red clover teas in my pantry now. Most of these are available as teas and aren't dangerous unless you're already on a blood thinner. Too much blood thinner can cause excessive bleeding.

            Herbs containing Coumadin: angelica root, arnica flower, anise, asafoetida, celery, chamomile, fenugreek, horse chestnut, licorice root, lovage root, parsley, passionflower herb, quassia, red clover
            rue, sweet clover.

            Herbs thought to contain salicylates: Meadowsweet, poplar, willow bark.

            Herbs with Anti-platelet properties: bromelain, clove, onion and turmeric.

            st. johns wort and ginko should be avoided if taking a blood thinner too.

            Wise, do you think that green leafy veggies which are high in vitamin K can pose a risk to those predisposed to clotting?
            Last edited by antiquity; 30 Aug 2007, 11:00 AM.

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              #7
              Thanks for the tea info Antiquity. I already have camomile quite often and I never knew it helped this aspect too.

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                #8
                YW Cherry.

                Here's a link to the PDR for herbal medicines site. Lists just about every herb popular in the West anyway, and their properties.

                http://www.pdrhealth.com/drug_info/n...gs/index.shtml

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                  #9
                  Cool resource. Yeeeeessh, some of the names - ''I'll have half a pound of Bugleweed, a quart of bog bean oh and some Cola nut while you're there''

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                    #10
                    Food on airplanes??? What a novel idea!

                    Wise, you must fly business or first class! I can't remember the last time I was fed on a flight within the USA (other than a few pretzels or peanuts). I pack a sack lunch when I fly coast to coast now.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
                      Food on airplanes??? What a novel idea!

                      Wise, you must fly business or first class! I can't remember the last time I was fed on a flight within the USA (other than a few pretzels or peanuts). I pack a sack lunch when I fly coast to coast now.

                      (KLD)

                      KLD, I fly almost exclusively economy. Continental gives you little sandwiches. However, I am courting DVT's because I take the 15.5 hour flight to Hong Kong and back each month. So, that is why this web page attracted my attention. By the way, I missed you in Florida.

                      Somebody told me that the polar flight route exposes passengers to the equivalent of a chest x-ray (10 millirems). Since I am doing it twice a month, that adds up to 24 chest x-rays per year or 240 milliREMs per year (Source). There is the other factor of the many hours that I am spending in airplanes, i.e. about 400 hours every year.

                      According to the FAA, flight crews are exposed to 950-hour per year and get between 20-910 milliRems per year. Even the highest level is still significantly below the recommended annual exposure of 5 REMs per year. The FAA estimates that these dosages will lead to an excess risk of cancer at about 6 cases/1000 crew members. Since the existing background cancer rate is 220/1000 per year, this presents only a 3% increase (Source).

                      I was researching the above when I found the web page regarding food to prevent DVTs. I was just thinking that the best food to feed people on these long distance airplane flights would be vegetbles containing a lot of ascorbic acid and vitamin E, and other antioxidants.

                      Wise.
                      Last edited by Wise Young; 30 Aug 2007, 3:23 PM.

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                        #12
                        thank you so much for the info dr.wise.every time i flu from europe to usa and viceversa my foot double their size ,swollen.

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