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  • Dairy Products Dangerous??

    OK, so the title sounds a little ridiculous!

    I am not sure whether I am posting this in the right forum, or whether this should go under "Care".

    When I was in hospital I specifically remember beig told by the doctors, that too many dairy products can cause spinal complications.

    I have also happened to stumble across a South African spinal injury booklet, aimed at poor Africans living in the Shanty Towns, who cannot read. On one of the pages it shows many bottles of milk and underneath it, it has a picture of a coffin!!
    I can't for the life of me remember what this drastic cause of death could be. Can it cause syrinex's or problems in the spinal cord?
    I have a small syrinx and want to know if my banana smoothies are only making things worse.

    Yes, this is a serious post and not a joke!
    Anything else is a bonus

  • #2
    Years ago, we used to limit calcium in those who were newly injured, hoping that would reduce the hypercalcemia seen in young (mostly) male patients occasionally, and hoping to reduce their risks for stones. Unfortunately, a low calcium diet is very unpalatable, and makes you miss out on a lot of foods (like high protein foods) needed for skin health.

    Now we know that most of the hypercalcemia and stones see in new injuries are NOT due to diet, but due to calcium coming out of the bones, so low calcium diets have been out of favor in the USA for at least 20 years. Dairy products are an excellent source of protein. Those who cannot eat dairy (due to conditions such as lactose intolerance) have a very hard time getting enough protein to keep their skin in good shape.

    I know of no evidence that high protein foods, or milk products have any impact on complications such as syrinx development.


    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
      Those who cannot eat dairy (due to conditions such as lactose intolerance) have a very hard time getting enough protein to keep their skin in good shape.
      (KLD)
      Protein Content of Cheese

      Food (1 oz unless stated)
      Protein (g)
      Cheese, blue 6.07g Cheese, cheddar 7.06g Cheese, feta 4.03g Cheese, mozzarella, part skim 7.79g Cheese, mozzarella, whole milk 5.51g Cheese, muenster 6.64g Cheese, neufchatel 2.82g Cheese, American 6.28g
      Protein Content of Fish 2.
      Fish (3oz cooked unless stated)
      Protein (g)
      Fish, tuna, yellowfin 25.47g Fish, tuna, white, canned water 20.08g Fish, tuna, light, canned oil 24.78g Fish, tuna, light, canned water 21.68g Fish, trout, rainbow 20.63g Fish, swordfish 21.58g Fish, sardine, canned oil 20.94g Fish, fish sticks, frozen (1 stick) 4.38g

      KLD, even when we multiply the protein valuse for the 1 oz of cheeses by three to equal the 3 oz portions of fish, you statements don't hold up.

      I could do other dairy products with simular results.

      "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
      J.B.S.Haldane

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      • #4
        For those who don't eat meat or fish, your numbers don't help much. The question was specifically about dairy products. Of course meat and fish are high in calcium. When I worked with adolescents with new SCI, you were hard pressed to find many who would eat fish though. Pizza, cheeseburgers, ice cream and milkshakes were what they were interested in eating.

        KLD
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse
          For those who don't eat meat or fish, your numbers don't help much. The question was specifically about dairy products. Of course meat and fish are high in calcium. When I worked with adolescents with new SCI, you were hard pressed to find many who would eat fish though. Pizza, cheeseburgers, ice cream and milkshakes were what they were interested in eating.

          KLD
          While the question was specifically about dairy it was not cast as a vegetarian or otherwise non meat/fish eating question. Your response makes/made it appear that a derth of dairy products in the diet will result in low protein but that clearly is not the case as we see in my reply above which makes it clear the equal weights of fish and cheese (the highest protein containing dairy food) reveals fish to have a def edge over all dairy.
          "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
          J.B.S.Haldane

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          • #6
            Dairy product danger?

            I use rice or soy-based substitutes for milk, cheese and butter. My cholesterol is about 225.

            Other than cholesterol concerns, I don't eat or drink dairy products too often, except for a cup of yogurt once a day or an occasional cheeseburger or slice of pizza. I fear the dairy food might reduce the urine's acidity, makng my bladder prone to infection.

            Are my fears unnecessary?

            I get a lot of protein from chicken, beef, pork and fish. If I could afford it, I would eat fish or seafood at every meal. It must be the New Englander genes in me.

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