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    #16
    Originally posted by hendra
    Dear Ian,

    It is my pleasure. Hope you don't mind I make some correction : Kegitu (begitu), Candaku (kegemaranku/kesukaanku). The rest are perfect Bahasa.

    Excuse my geography. Where is The Antipodes ? (maafkan geography saya, dimana Antipodes ?)

    Nett..
    Antipodes=Australia, thank you for the corrections. I returned your PM.

    Comment


      #17
      Indian recipes

      Please visit my BLOG:
      http://rasoiya.blogspot.com/
      I am trying to consolidate all indian vegetable dishes.
      Currently available recipes: (daily updates)
      Samosa
      Pakoda
      Mughlai Paratha
      Gujhia
      Palak Paneer
      Shahi Paneer
      Paneer Capsicum
      Chatpata Bhel
      Peas Puri
      Navratan Korma
      Corn Chat
      Aloo Mutter
      Gajar Halwa
      Aloo Paratha
      Chole
      BHATURE
      Naan

      Comments and suggestions are welcome
      Thank you.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by hendra
        Dr. Young,

        I am Indonesian of Chinese descend. My Chinese tutor from China (Fu Jian province) never see this word or heard about it. She said it could be a phrase which words then put together to form a symbol. The noodle look like Wonton skin but thicker. It should not be difficult to make if have pasta maker. I lived in United States for 6 years, but trips to China really astounded me. It is certainly a vast country. Their public places really huge. I never see so many people gather in one place. Netti
        Hello Netti, I've been waiting for someone to come up with a recipie for biang biang mian or the biang biang noodles since Dr Wise started teasing me with this thread.

        I have an extrusion (powered) type pasta maker which can make wide noodles. Can/would you tell me how to make biang biang noodles and biang biang mian (maybe they're the same thing?).
        "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
        J.B.S.Haldane

        Comment


          #19
          Juke,

          Here is a close-up picture of the biang biang mian. It is served in a big dish and everybody fills up a bowl of the stuff, often very spicy. This is from a great site that describes the special food of the shaanxi province (where Xi'an is):


          A bowl of Biang Biang Mian being served from a big dish


          The noodles come with beans, spice, and all sorts of other stuff.

          Here is another picture of biang biang mian from a Chinese web site:
          http://www.byonline.net/new/article_sh.asp?id=5462

          This is actually the way it looks like at the restaurants where I have eaten it.


          But there are many other kinds of noodles in Xi'an which I consider the noodle capitol of the world

          These are called mi mian pi (a favorite of women because it means face complexion noodle)

          If you like hot spicy noodles, this is it

          Noodles drenched in chili oil

          Here is something that is less spicy

          Qi Shan mian

          According to one blogger, this is how it is done http://www.roboo.com/news/ChewingTheFatInXian.htm
          The noodle dough is rolled flat and pulled into long strips a couple inches wide. Imperfect squares are pulled from the strip and tossed in a big vat of boiling water. When cooked, smooth and tender, the noodles are fished out and served with ground pork, vegetables and a brown sauce with a little bit of bite.

          We talked to Zhao Jian, owner of the noodle shop at 222 Shang Jian Lu, who explained that biang biang noodles are “one of the wonders of Shaanxi,” a secret technique and recipe that hasn’t left the province since biang biang were born more than 1,000 years ago. There are a few restaurants that serve the noodle in Xi’an, but Zhao said biang biang are biggest in nearby Xianyang, where they got their start. Of course, Zhao, a Xianyang native, claims to have the best biang biang in Xi’an.
          Apparently, some noodles are good for coughs and phlegm, according to this web site:
          http://www.aaaom.org/Top%2050%20Chin...20Recipes.html
          7. Xing Ren Dao Xiao Mian (Knife noodle with Xing Ren) for stopping cough and transforming phlegm
          Apricot seed (Xing Ren) 30g
          Peanut (Hua Sheng) 100g
          White sesame (Bai Zhi Ma) 50g
          Soy Sauce 50g
          Vinegar
          Sugar
          Sesame oil
          Mix vegetable
          Salt
          Black pepper
          Olive oil
          1. Fry Xing Ren, Hua Shen, Bai Zhi Ma and crush into powder.
          Mix soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, sesame oil, vegetables salt and pepper together to make a sauce.
          Make dough with ingredients from steps 1 and 2, cut into small pieces and toss into boiling water.
          Function: Tonify lung Yin, stop cough and transform phlegm
          I had previously stated that biang biang mian is made from buckwheat. I am now no longer sure that this is the case. According to http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_...Pasta.html#p10
          Chinese noodles are made with a variety of ingredients. Those made from mung-bean flour, also called peastarch, are glistening white and are called bean threads, cellophane noodles, powdered silk noodles, shining noodles, or transparent noodles. Noodles made from seaweed are also called cellophane noodles. These types of noodles are very thin and hairlike.
          It may be made from mung-bean flour since it is glistening white. Buckwheat would be brownish. The Chinese that I spoke to called it pidai noodles as well. Pidai means leather belt.

          http://www.shanghaidiaries.com/gallery/shaanxi/IMG_1001 has a bunch of comments on the noodles.
          As a Chinese,I myself was surprised when I saw this character for the first time.The word "biang" can't be found in any dictionary. It doesn't exist in the standard lexicon. However,according to what I found out after a little research,it's not an artistic invention,either.This word has been passed on by word of mouth over a thousand years. It's one of the two words coined in Shaanxi province in the history of this ancient city,the other one being "•×zhao" which was coined by Empress Wu Zetian to be used only in her name meaning "the sun and the moon are shining in the sky".The making of the charecter "biang" derived from the local folklore which tells the story of a poor student who went to the local noodle restaurant called "biang biang"(because of the sound when making the noodle) and offered to make the character when he found that he couldn't afford the noodle.He used this character to express his anger about his time. It's said that he was reciting a poem when he wrote,or more precisely,coined this character.
          Last edited by Wise Young; 23 Sep 2006, 11:46 PM.

          Comment


            #20
            Has anyone been to Hong Kong and tried their noodles? Noodles houses there serve "hofan", a kind of noodle with same color(as Biang biang) but its width is between Biang Biang and Mi Mien. Basically its the ingredients that you put that makes the taste the so called hofan is tasteless but its texture is soft and smooth.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by chak
              Has anyone been to Hong Kong and tried their noodles? Noodles houses there serve "hofan", a kind of noodle with same color(as Biang biang) but its width is between Biang Biang and Mi Mien. Basically its the ingredients that you put that makes the taste the so called hofan is tasteless but its texture is soft and smooth.
              Although I have been in Hong Kong for nearly 3 months, I must say that I have not yet encountered a single restaurant that offers biang biang mian. I have looked in Shanghai and Beijing as well. Many Chinese have no idea what biang biang mian is This is something of a fancy of Americans, I am beginning to think. Almost every Chinese person I have met did not know how to write biang and some even doubt that the character is real, even in Xi'an. I asked my young colleagues at the Giaotong Hospital in Xi'an and they couldn't come up with the character.

              But, I must say that I have had real biang biang mian in Xi'an. It costs about ¥68 in an expensive restaurant and one dish can serve 6 people. Throw in a couple orders of dumplings (which Xi'an is also famous for), a few vegetable dishes, a half a dozen quarts of bitter melon beer (ku kwa 苦瓜, a green beer made by Tsingdao) for ¥2 per quart, you can easily satisfy a party of half a dozen hungry people for ¥100 (about US$12). In my opinion, this is one of the best food values in the world.

              Wise.

              Comment


                #22
                Ban Mian Recipe

                I found in my noodle cook book a recipe for "Ban Mian". I am not sure if it is similar with Biang Biang Mian, but the method of making rather unusual, the dough is soaked in water for 1-2 hours before press and flatten.

                Here is the recipe :
                300 g plain flour
                1 egg
                2 T oil
                150 ml water
                1t salt

                Combine flour and other ingredients. Knead lightly until form a smooth dough. Cut dough into small pieces or cubes. Soak them in cool water for at least 1-2 hours.

                Remove dough from water (by this time it would be watery and soft), dust with more flour so won't stick to your hands. Press and flatten with rolling pin or pasta maker. Cut into 3cm wide long strips (or if you prefer, may cut each strip into 5cm long). Drop noodle into boiling water and cook until done (1-2 minutes). Dish out, place into serving bowl, pour in hot chicken broth, serve with stir fried minced pork, blanched Chinese white cabbage (shredded), green onion and drizzle with some fried shallots and chili oil/flakes

                Bon-appetite.

                Netti

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by hendra
                  I found in my noodle cook book a recipe for "Ban Mian". I am not sure if it is similar with Biang Biang Mian, but the method of making rather unusual, the dough is soaked in water for 1-2 hours before press and flatten.

                  Here is the recipe :
                  300 g plain flour
                  1 egg
                  2 T oil
                  150 ml water
                  1t salt

                  Combine flour and other ingredients. Knead lightly until form a smooth dough. Cut dough into small pieces or cubes. Soak them in cool water for at least 1-2 hours.

                  Remove dough from water (by this time it would be watery and soft), dust with more flour so won't stick to your hands. Press and flatten with rolling pin or pasta maker. Cut into 3cm wide long strips (or if you prefer, may cut each strip into 5cm long). Drop noodle into boiling water and cook until done (1-2 minutes). Dish out, place into serving bowl, pour in hot chicken broth, serve with stir fried minced pork, blanched Chinese white cabbage (shredded), green onion and drizzle with some fried shallots and chili oil/flakes

                  Bon-appetite.

                  Netti
                  I sincerely thank you for taking the time to transcribe the above recipie for me but I have real reservations about attempting to make noodles from it. A big one stems from Wise's comment that the Biang Biang nooldes of Xi'an are probably based on mung bean flour. Then there is the problem of the noodles of your reicpie calling for "regular flour" as there is only a convention of "regular flour" and I'm unfamiliar with the convention in this case. The last and biggest problem I have with the recipie is its calling for soaking small pieces of lightly kneaded dough in cool water for one or more hours. I have a great deal of difficulty imagining doing anything effective with pieces of wet stickey dough; it's daunting.

                  Since Wise's description and pictures of some of the variations of Biang Biang Mien make clear the central role of sauces and various condiments to the final dish, I'll just rack this one up as a semi-errotic, exotic fantasy of a meal. Some things are better tasted through the veil of imagination.

                  Thanks, anyway, Netti.
                  "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                  J.B.S.Haldane

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Jukes, heres a good one, its a fish laksa. It satisfies your vegetarian requirement and can be made with any type of noodles. Its a dish that can be attempted by a beginner, even i can make it. (chillies required!)
                    New recipe of the week: Malaysian fish laksa


                    A popular way to enjoy noodles throughout Asia is to add them to richly-flavored soups. This bulks out the soup and turns it into a meal in itself instead of simply being an appetizer. Noodle soups are particularly popular in Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia and Malaysia. This week's featured recipe is a Malaysian noodle soup called laksa. There are many varieties of laksa, but fish, seafood and chicken laksas are the most popular.
                    This fish laksa is particularly healthful because it contains oily fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids which help reduce the risk of heart disease and many other chronic conditions.


                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by IanTPoulter
                      Jukes, heres a good one, its a fish laksa. It satisfies your vegetarian requirement and can be made with any type of noodles. Its a dish that can be attempted by a beginner, even i can make it. (chillies required!)


                      Thanks, Ian. I've copied and printed the recipe and will soon order a few of the less locally available items online. I understand the value of using the mackerel or swordfish specified in the recipie but may substitute coho salmon (I've a freezer full of it); of the two oily fish, swordfish is expensive and mackerel is rarely available here. It looks to be a very spicey dish with a multitude of flavors.
                      "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                      J.B.S.Haldane

                      Comment


                        #26
                        There is a guy by the name of Prince Roy who apparently lives (lived?) in India but travels extensively in China and has written some of the most worshipful and detailed articles on internet concerning Chinese noodles. Here is one where he not only details a particular Sichuan noodle called shào 绍子面 and describes substitute commercial noodles from Taiwan (http://www.princeroy.org/?p=219).

                        These are of course not biang biang noodles, illustrated from another blog http://theabc.typepad.com/my_weblog/2006/04/index.html

                        The expression on the girl's face is universal.

                        This topic has convinced me that I need to take a picture of every interesting dish that I have eaten in China. While I have taken some pictures of very unusual dishes (such as bamboo grubs and fried wasps, below), I hadn't thought of taking pictures of biang biang noodles. The picture below is of my colleague Dongming Sun about to put a fried bamboo grub (dish on lower right) in his mouth and a neurosurgeon at Kunming. The interesting looking dish with characters on it and the red pepper sticking out is almost 90% chile pepper and 10% other ingredients.
                        Last edited by Wise Young; 24 Sep 2006, 12:44 PM.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          In Guangzhou, I once had a bowl of live shrimp. It is impossible to show what it looks like in a still photo and I have constructed an animated gif from three sequential photos, showing the movement. Since it is sort of gruesome, I have put it into the Member's Forum.
                          /forum/showthread.php?t=69646

                          Wise.
                          Last edited by Wise Young; 24 Sep 2006, 2:36 PM.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Wise, please don't ever post pictures of fried worms again.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by antiquity
                              Wise, please don't ever post pictures of fried worms again.
                              Sorry... And please don't click the link for the shrimps.

                              Wise.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by Wise Young
                                Sorry... And please don't click the link for the shrimps.

                                Wise.
                                Too late.

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