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  • #16
    Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
    What cut of meat are you using? Those that are very lean are most likely to turn out dry.

    When I make an oven roast (often using an eye of round roast), I either use the high temperature Joy of Cooking method (425F for 20 minutes, then turn down to 350F for 20 min./lb.) or the oven-turn-off method (preheat oven to 500F, put in roast and turn down to 475F, roast for 21 minutes (seven minutes per pound) then turn off the oven and let the roast sit in the hot oven for 2 1/2 hours. Do not open the door at all during this time!). For medium rare, your internal temperature should be 135-140F.

    I cover the roast with a favorite barbecue sauce and place in a shallow roasting pan. I don't include veggies...I cook those separately (I prefer a baked or re-baked potato and sautéed onions or mushrooms).

    (KLD)
    My son and I had a couple of beef tenderloins the other night. I wish I had seen this method earlier. I am anxious to use it the next time and will definitely use it on the roasts I get at costco that will be fabulous done this way.
    Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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    • #17
      cooking bags are always a good idea as well as injecting the meat to keep it very moist.

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      • #18
        There is a big difference between dry roasting and pot roasting. Generally the more tender cuts of meat are dry roasted, like prime rib. Cuts like chuck roasts are best pot roasted or braised with vegetables and liquids like stock and wine.

        A great technique for almost any cut of beef, pork or lamb and poultry (think roast chicken or the Thanksgiving day turkey) is dry salt brining. This year for Thanksgiving I will dry brine our turkey (but the basic principal can be applied to other meats). The method is as follows:
        For every 5 pounds of turkey, measure 1 Tablespoon of kosher salt. If you have a 15 pound turkey, you need 3 Tablespoons of kosher salt.
        ---Dry cavities and outside of turkey thoroughly with paper towels
        ---Sprinkle about 1 Tablespoon into the body and neck cavities.
        ---Sprinkle about 1 Tablespoon on the breast, wings top of thighs and legs
        ---Sprinkle about 1 Tablespoon on the back of the turkey, thighs and legs
        ---Place the turkey into a brining bag or a turkey sized brown in/roasting bag.
        ---Close with a twist tie.
        ---Place the bagged turkey into another brining bag or brown in/roasting bag
        ---Close with a twist tie, place bagged turkey in a roasting pan
        ---Place roasting pan in the refrigerator for 3 days.
        ---On the 4th day remove the turkey from the refrigerator and remove bag.
        ---Place turkey on a roasting rack in a roasting pan. Do not cover
        ---Place turkey in the refrigerator and allow to air dry for at least 8 hours before roasting.
        ---When ready to roast the turkey, stuff cavities with rough chopped onions, celery, carrots, and sprigs of thyme, rosemary, and parsley
        ---Allow the turkey to stand at room temperature for 1-2 hours before roasting
        ---Preheat oven to 425°
        ---Roast turkey breast side DOWN or a v-rack for 30 minutes.
        ---Remove turkey from oven and reduce temperature to 325°
        ---Using wads of paper towels, grasp the turkey at the top and bottom and flip the turkey to the back, breast side UP. Add 1 cup water or unsalted stock to the roasting pan.
        ---Return turkey to oven and continue to roast for 2-1/2 to 3 hours or until the internal temperature taken at the meatiest part of the thigh reaches 165° as measured by a meat thermometer. Keep an eye on the pan juices so they don't smoke and burn. Add water or stock 1 cup at a time as needed.
        ---Remove turkey from the oven and transfer to a platter or cutting board.
        ---Tent turkey loosely with foil and allow to stand for 30-40 minutes before carving. Meanwhile, heat your side dishes and make gravy.

        The turkey will be incredibly moist and well seasoned. This dry brine method is abundantly easier than a soaking brine where you use gallons of water. Note: Buy a turkey that has not been injected with any solutions. These solutions are already salty. Taste the pan drippings before making the gravy. You may not need to salt the gravy at all.

        NL (GJ's wife and caregiver)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
          What cut of meat are you using? Those that are very lean are most likely to turn out dry.

          When I make an oven roast (often using an eye of round roast), I either use the high temperature Joy of Cooking method (425F for 20 minutes, then turn down to 350F for 20 min./lb.) or the oven-turn-off method (preheat oven to 500F, put in roast and turn down to 475F, roast for 21 minutes (seven minutes per pound) then turn off the oven and let the roast sit in the hot oven for 2 1/2 hours. Do not open the door at all during this time!). For medium rare, your internal temperature should be 135-140F.


          (KLD)
          I just tried this method for a roast dinner with my son. I used an eye of round I got from costco...

          I have never had a better roast in all of my life. I got the roasts at costco and they are among the least expensive of all the roasts they sell. I have cooked these using the traditional method for many years, but NEVER will again. I LOVE THIS METHOD!!! and cannot emphasise enough how good it was.

          All through dinner we were moaning and mmm-ing. I think it would be great also with a boneless rib roast or a New York strip roast. I am going to the store right now to get one as it is on sale. Bye and thank you sovery much for sharing thiw method with us.
          Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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          • #20
            1 chuck roast
            montreal steak seasoning
            garlic cloves
            carrots
            ruttabaga
            turnips
            beef broth and red wine
            i've done the forgetabout it method: set oven to 150 - 200, cut slits in the meat and stuff the garlic in. season the outside with the montreal steak seasoning.
            put the veggies on the bottom, add the meat and pour the liquid in. cover. put in oven for 4-6hrs while you sleep.

            beef is ready to put into scrambled eggs in the morning

            other way i do it is at 400 for 2 - 3hrs. i.... never used a thermometer when cooking. i touch it. rare is the same give as the skin below your bottom lip, med is the same give as your nose and well done is the same as your forehead.
            "Smells like death in a bucket of chicken!"
            http://www.elportavoz.com/

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            • #21
              Eye of round roast was my mother's cut. Grew up on that stuff. But she never used that cooking technique. I'm going to try it as well during the holiday season. I have a fancy European convection oven that nobody can figure out. This may be the easiest way to go.

              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              What cut of meat are you using? Those that are very lean are most likely to turn out dry.

              When I make an oven roast (often using an eye of round roast), I either use the high temperature Joy of Cooking method (425F for 20 minutes, then turn down to 350F for 20 min./lb.) or the oven-turn-off method (preheat oven to 500F, put in roast and turn down to 475F, roast for 21 minutes (seven minutes per pound) then turn off the oven and let the roast sit in the hot oven for 2 1/2 hours. Do not open the door at all during this time!). For medium rare, your internal temperature should be 135-140F.

              I cover the roast with a favorite barbecue sauce and place in a shallow roasting pan. I don't include veggies...I cook those separately (I prefer a baked or re-baked potato and sautéed onions or mushrooms).

              (KLD)

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Van Quad View Post
                Eye of round roast was my mother's cut. Grew up on that stuff. But she never used that cooking technique. I'm going to try it as well during the holiday season. I have a fancy European convection oven that nobody can figure out. This may be the easiest way to go.
                You will love this method. I don't think it would work very well for a blade or a chuck type roast, as those are best kept for use as a traditional pot roast. Try this method on an eye of round just once and you will never ever go back.

                It is safer than others I think because the dish cools a little in the time needed cooking with the oven off. No really hot pans to wrangle and all the time in the world to prepare the side dishes. The house smells like you are roasting a prime rib roast if you have just a little fat on the cut. Just a little, not much at 500 degrees and the fire risk.

                I cannot tell yu how good this roast was. It was perfection.
                Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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                • #23
                  I use an oven proof skillet just large enough for my roast.

                  Put just enough veg oil (EVOO will burn) in the bottom of a screaming hot pan to coat. (Hot pan + cold oil = no sticking).

                  Season the meat with salt and pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, thyme (Montreal works as it has enough in to avoid the separate seasonings-just do not use more salt, there is enough there Sear the meat to keep in the juice.

                  Transfer to a hot (450+) oven and immediately turn it down to 350. Check it in 20-30 minutes with a thermometer. I pull at rare and when it has rested, I get medium rare.

                  Remember, the larger the piece of meat, the more carry over cooking you will get while resting. That is why I pull at rare. My eye roasts melt in your mouth and slice very thin for sammies the next day when the remaining roast is cold.

                  I adapted this from Ida Garten's method for beef tenderloin. I cannot afford tenderloin but get the eye roasts at Costco on a regular basis.--eak
                  Elizabeth A. Kephart, PHR
                  mom/caregiver to Ryan-age 21
                  Incomplete C-2 with TBI since 3/09

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                  • #24
                    With the oven off method, is the roast left covered or uncovered?
                    "Would you rather reduce deficits and interest rates by raising revenue from those who are not now paying their fair share, or would you rather accept larger budget deficits, higher interest rates, and higher unemployment? And I think I know your answer." Ronald Reagan"

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by trekker6 View Post
                      With the oven off method, is the roast left covered or uncovered?
                      Uncovered.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                        Uncovered.

                        (KLD)
                        thanks, after Skippys glowing testimonial, I'm going out to buy a roast and do a taste test, will post the results.
                        "Would you rather reduce deficits and interest rates by raising revenue from those who are not now paying their fair share, or would you rather accept larger budget deficits, higher interest rates, and higher unemployment? And I think I know your answer." Ronald Reagan"

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by trekker6 View Post
                          thanks, after Skippys glowing testimonial, I'm going out to buy a roast and do a taste test, will post the results.
                          I put my roast on a rack in a pan and put the fat side up. I did notseason the roast as I never put salt in any food and I was concerned that at that high a temp the seasonings would burn. I made it plain for potential sandwiches, but there was no leftovers to speak of. Next time I will cook two at the same time.
                          Anything worth doing, is worth doing to excess

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                          • #28
                            I made a 5 1/2 pound eye of round roast and it is delicious, my daughter and fiancé loved it and the slices are wonderful and juicy 5 days later.
                            "Would you rather reduce deficits and interest rates by raising revenue from those who are not now paying their fair share, or would you rather accept larger budget deficits, higher interest rates, and higher unemployment? And I think I know your answer." Ronald Reagan"

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                            • #29
                              I love roast beef but these days I do not mess around with a hot oven much. My last standing rib roast was done on my grill at about 500 with the lid shut. This past Sunday I did a braised pot roast on top of the range. You can use just about any kind of lean roast. Brown it, throw in some beef stock/boullion and wine, throw in some seasoning, and braise until fork tender (2-3 hours). Throw in some root veggies and cook another 30-45 minutes depending on how big they are. So easy and so good. I usually use salt, pepper, a couple cloves of garlic, and a good dose of Italian seasoning.
                              You can go with any seasonings you like. Just keep an eye on it and add water if necessary.
                              You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
                              http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

                              See my personal webpage @
                              http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

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