Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

making homemade bread

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    I'm not into making bread, except for one try decades ago to make a couple of rolls with sprouted wheat flower, sprouting and drying and grinding the wheat myself. It was fun and delicious but way too much work. When you mentioned quinoa I remembered the banana bread I often made with a mix of quinoa and corn flower. If you are interested I could look if I can find the recipe. Don't know if I kept it though.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Regine View Post
      I'm not into making bread, except for one try decades ago to make a couple of rolls with sprouted wheat flower, sprouting and drying and grinding the wheat myself. It was fun and delicious but way too much work. When you mentioned quinoa I remembered the banana bread I often made with a mix of quinoa and corn flower. If you are interested I could look if I can find the recipe. Don't know if I kept it though.
      Regine, sure; find and post the recipe if possible. It would be appreciated.
      "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
      J.B.S.Haldane

      Comment


        #18
        Hi Juke! I couldn't believe it when I saw your name by a post.
        How are you? Still into cooking, eating good food I see.
        Hope all is well with you! Post more often. Mona
        sigpic

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by jody View Post
          mmmmm bread!
          and a little butter, yum yum
          We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions.
          Ronald Reagan

          Comment


            #20
            I made Bannana/Walnut bread last night, was really yummy with butter this morning and a cup of coffee.

            no kneading involved. Although I have made bread with kneading involved. I think as long as you start with a good bread recipe the kneading by hand is easy and doesnt take much. I am not an expert but I just put flour on the hands and push it arounda bit and it seems to work. I am trying to get a recipe from my mom that is a 7 grain or a 5 grain recipe and is amazing. I will post it as soon as I get it from her.
            Last edited by medic1; 26 Mar 2010, 7:24 PM.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Juke_spin View Post
              Wesley, that was exciting and logical with the explanation. No specific recipies though. I'll do a few searches and am sure I'll come up with something useful that I can add quinoa ("keen wah" to.
              Here are a few to check-out and modify a bit:

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,184,...230196,00.html

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,174,...243202,00.html

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,174,1...243202,00.html

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,194,1...230192,00.html

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,184,1...230197,00.html

              http://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/0,184,1...231196,00.html

              Just be sure you are searching for "no knead yeast bread" or you will end up with nothing but a lot of quick bread recipes. Not the same at all.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

              Comment


                #22
                I found the recipe for the banana bread.
                Mix 1/2 cup of melted butter with 1/2 cup of maple syrup.
                Add (optional: 2 eggs, slightly whipped), 3 ripe bananas squeezed with a fork, juice of 1 lemon.
                Into all this you mix 1 cup of quinoa flour, 1 cup of corn flour, 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda, 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
                Pour this into a buttered cake pan and bake at 375 degree for 45 minutes.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Yes, that is a quick bread (batter, not dough) recipe. Tons of those out there, but that is not a yeast bread.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    There are 2 types of whole wheat flour - pastry, and normal. Pastry usually gives alighter loaf.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      A 3 minute bread-making video. Be sure to wear an old shirt.

                      http://tv.gawker.com/5512928/how-not-to-make-bread
                      Blog:
                      Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

                      Comment


                        #26
                        bread

                        I make the "Artisan bread in five minutes a day" from the cookbook. It's awesome. Requires very little effort.

                        Here's a link to the recipe:

                        http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-...tes-A-Day.aspx
                        Ugh, I've been kissed by a dog!
                        Get some hot water, get some iodine ...
                        -- Lucy VanPelt

                        Comment


                          #27
                          I've tried for years to make crispy bread and finally found an almost fool proof recipe. I got it from America's Test Kitchen (I saw it on PBS and also got the recipe from their website). It's based on Mark Bittman's almost no knead recipe that they tweak a bit.

                          For the crispiness the key is to bake it in a dutch oven (I bought a Le Crueset). You pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees and put your dutch oven in the oven for 30 minutes with the cover on. You place your bread dough in the dutch oven after its preheated for 30 minutes (with parchment paper) and turn the oven down to 425. Bake for 25 minutes with the cover on then remove the cover and bake another 20 minutes or until the bread reaches about 210 degree with an instant read thermometer.

                          The steam from the dutch oven is what gives the bread its crispiness. I've tried other recipes and have gotten the same results w.r.t. crispy bread by using the dutch oven.

                          Note: If you have a LeCrueset make certain you replace the knob. I read on America's Test Kitchen where they had a tendency to explode at 500 degrees believe it or not.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by steveg View Post
                            I've tried for years to make crispy bread and finally found an almost fool proof recipe. I got it from America's Test Kitchen (I saw it on PBS and also got the recipe from their website). It's based on Mark Bittman's almost no knead recipe that they tweak a bit.

                            For the crispiness the key is to bake it in a dutch oven (I bought a Le Crueset). You pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees and put your dutch oven in the oven for 30 minutes with the cover on. You place your bread dough in the dutch oven after its preheated for 30 minutes (with parchment paper) and turn the oven down to 425. Bake for 25 minutes with the cover on then remove the cover and bake another 20 minutes or until the bread reaches about 210 degree with an instant read thermometer.

                            The steam from the dutch oven is what gives the bread its crispiness. I've tried other recipes and have gotten the same results w.r.t. crispy bread by using the dutch oven.

                            Note: If you have a LeCrueset make certain you replace the knob. I read on America's Test Kitchen where they had a tendency to explode at 500 degrees believe it or not.
                            Thanks to everyone for these suggestions. My prob. with the above recipe is that it seems you've got to sacrafice any "normal" bread shape to the dutch oven shape - unless you can put a regular shaped pan in the dutch oven. I suppose I could live with the odd shape for the fine crust though. I'm in the middle of moving again so I'll have to put the tests on hold until I settle in at the new place. Thanks again.
                            "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                            J.B.S.Haldane

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Juke_spin View Post
                              Thanks to everyone for these suggestions. My prob. with the above recipe is that it seems you've got to sacrafice any "normal" bread shape to the dutch oven shape - unless you can put a regular shaped pan in the dutch oven. I suppose I could live with the odd shape for the fine crust though. I'm in the middle of moving again so I'll have to put the tests on hold until I settle in at the new place. Thanks again.
                              You can do this with a ceramic bread pan and either several layers of heavy duty foil or something heavy, flat and heat proof (like a small baking stone) for a lid. The foil can be difficult to secure over the hot pan, though. The point is getting something heavy that will really hold heat, and not allowing any moisture to escape - the dough's own moisture steams the crust, creating that distinctive texture.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by Katja View Post
                                You can do this with a ceramic bread pan and either several layers of heavy duty foil or something heavy, flat and heat proof (like a small baking stone) for a lid. The foil can be difficult to secure over the hot pan, though. The point is getting something heavy that will really hold heat, and not allowing any moisture to escape - the dough's own moisture steams the crust, creating that distinctive texture.
                                With a little trouble this seems like an excellent solution, Katja. If I had someplace better than the streets to live, I could try it out.

                                Thanks.
                                "The world will not perish for want of wonders but for want of wonder."
                                J.B.S.Haldane

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X