Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vegetarians?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Recently I've been laying off meat but for a totally opposite reason.
    Unfortunately unless you're buying organic lamb, venison, beef, chicken, etc.,
    it won't be bambi or a fluffy, little white lamb you're eating.
    It will be chicken stacked 12 cages high, 4-5 hens packed in each cage.
    They peck each other to death, feces all over each other falling from the top cage all the way to the bottom. I watched that on Oprah and haven't ate chicken since.
    Then the cows lay sick, half dead in cages together. No more beef.
    I want to eat meat but I can't put it in my mouth.
    There are no stores in my town that sell organic.
    I went to eating wild salmon but I can only eat so much because of the mercury levels nowadays.
    I'm living on fruit smoothies (protein mix), organic eggs, and veggies.
    sigpic

    Comment


      #17
      Yes, the reason I went vege in the first place was because of the factory farming conditions that are abhorrent to even think about, and which clearly cause enormous suffering. On top of that the animals are injected with steroids, growth hormones, and antibiotics, none of which is good for them or the person eating their flesh. Factory farming is one of the most disgusting operations immaginable, with animals routinely abused by bored and neanderthal-like workers. Terrified animals produce Cortisol, a stres hormone (as do we) and some think that isn't exactly in our best interest to be injesting either. I eat lentils and other beans, lots of nuts, fruits and veggies, especially dark green ones like spinach and broccoli that have great nutrient value. I do eat cheese and ice cream, so that is another source of protein for me.

      Comment


        #18
        Makes sense Eileen. Disgusting how they're allowed to treat animals.
        I need to eat more beans. So today (after reading this yesterday lol)
        I'm having pinto beans, long grain & wild rice, and brocolli.
        I think beans and rice make a complete protein. I need to ck it out.
        You need complete proteins & b12 if you don't eat meat.
        sigpic

        Comment


          #19
          Mona, I also take a multi-vitamin daily. Right now I happen to be using the Women's Once A Day vitamin, and it has important vitamins and also vitamin D, something that most North American's seem to lack these days, mostly because our sun intake is limited at best.

          Comment


            #20
            fwiw - years ago, I visited a large community of folks who all ate a vegan diet. A medical team tested the children as part of a study. The only nutritional deficiency reported was vitamin B-12. The adults were not tested.
            Foolish

            "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

            "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Foolish Old View Post
              fwiw - years ago, I visited a large community of folks who all ate a vegan diet. A medical team tested the children as part of a study. The only nutritional deficiency reported was vitamin B-12. The adults were not tested.
              Yes, the meat industry has done a great job propagandizing how badly we need meat to be healthy, and not surprisingly, have ignored other studies showing lower rates of diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and other illnesses that corolate to a meat-based diet.

              Comment


                #22
                i'm vegetarian through the tasty animals i eat!

                its unbelievable how uneducated some of you are farming practices. or is everything you read on the internet and see on tv true nowadays?

                i'm sure oprah found the worst example of farming and put it on her show and now is selling you organic products for ridiculous prices and getting a cut of profits. who are the abused animals now? (hint: hits you, u just don't know it yet)

                ps plants have feelings too.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Nearly all the meat I do eat is free range and organic which I buy from local producers at a farmer's market. Although it is considerably more expensive than the grocery store meat, this assauges my guilt for eating animals somewhat. The conditions that animals are treated is important to me but isn't the sole reason I want to cut meat out of my diet as I know there are farming operations that do treat their animals humanely. Not all are big factory farms with no conscious. But then of course the meat then comes at a premium price that most people can't really afford.

                  For me it's just a combination of concerns about animals and wanting to improve my diet and my health, plus also realizing that when I eat meat I pretty much eat the same few things over and over all the time. I am bored with it. Eating is a struggle for me because since my injury it feels like a chore more than anything else and I don't have a good eating habits at all. I need to change that because my health is suffering from it. I have become interested lately in many kinds of vegetables I am totally unfamiliar with and the more I learn about how versitile and healthy some of them are, it just seemed like a good idea all around and might make eating more interesting and pleasant.

                  Anyways I am on day 2 of my meat free plan. I almost waivered this morning with some turkey bacon but resisted lol.

                  I doubt I am going to cut meat out all together (despite the lamb incident). But if I can cut back to maybe once a week instead of 4 or 5 times that would be good.
                  Last edited by orangejello; 12 Apr 2009, 1:01 PM.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Whether you settle on a strict or liberal definition for your vegan lifestyle, you will definitely have to cut animal products from your eating plan. Most of your new protein sources will contain carbohydrates, so a low carbohydrate/vegan meal would be incredibly hard to achieve. You would have to severely restrict carbohydrate foods, such as grains, fruits, and vegetables, and, as a result, you would be at risk of not meeting your nutrient needs. Grain products serve as the main sources of B vitamins, which are essential for metabolism and growth/maintenance of body tissues, and the benefits of carbohydrate rich fruits and vegetables are backed by many scientific studies.

                    Reduce your intake of a certain group of foods that provides a lot of carbohydrate but lacks so many of those great nutrients. That group of foods, "junk food," is the ideal place to cut carbs, chemicals added in processing, and unhealthy trans fats. So, go ahead and cut back on chips, crackers, sugary cereals, breakfast bars, cookies, candy, and soda, but don't sacrifice the whole grain goodness that you find in a steaming bowl of oatmeal.

                    Although you will be cutting the commonly recognized protein sources — meat, fish, poultry, dairy — from your eating plan, have no worries... plant foods also contain a good amount of protein.
                    FoodPortion SizeProtein (in grams)bread (whole wheat)1 slice3potato1 medium3oatmeal (cooked)1 cup6nuts and seeds¼ cup6legumes½ cup8tofu½ cup9soy milk8 ounces9

                    Experts at the Institute of Medicine have recommended that we take in 15 - 20 percent of calories from protein, which amounts to about 65 grams of protein per day for men, and approximately 55 grams for women.

                    By cutting animal products out of your eating plan, you will have cut out the most common sources of a number of key nutrients. Vitamin B12, vitamin D, calcium, and omega-3 fatty acids are now high priority nutrients when it comes to planning a nutritionally adequate vegan eating plan.

                    Vitamin B12 The only reliable sources of vitamin B12 are animal products, fortified cereals, fortified soy products and nutritional yeast (Red Star Nutritional Yeast, 4 micrograms (mcg)/tablespoon). Not all cereals or soy products are fortified, so check the nutrient label for this information. The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for adults is 2.4 mcg/day.

                    Vitamin D Vitamin D is found in fortified dairy products, but is also made by our skin with sun exposure. Adequate Intake (AI) has been set at 200 International Units (IU)/day for people aged 19 - 50 years, and 400 IU/day for those 51 - 69 years of age. Your needs can be met by getting an average of 15 minutes of summer sun on your face or hands, 2 - 3 times per week. To ensure adequate levels of vitamin D, incorporate fortified non-dairy milks (e.g., soy, rice, almond milks) and cereals listed above into your daily intake. Check nutrient labels for fortification information.

                    Calcium Calcium is essential for building and maintaining bone structure, as well as proper functioning of muscles and nerve reactions. Though Americans tend to depend on dairy for calcium, this nutrient is found in plant foods such as collard greens, kale, almonds, tahini, and blackstrap molasses. Soy products can also be good sources, but be sure to check the nutrient label, because calcium content varies depending on processing methods. An 8 oz serving of fortified soy or rice milk will provide 1/3 of your daily needs (1000 mg/day for persons < 50 years of age, 1200 mg for > 50 years of age).

                    Omega-3 fatty acids Pay attention to your need for essential omega-3 fatty acids. Vegan sources are flax, soybean, and canola oils. The Adequate Intake of omega-3 is 1.6 g/day and 1.1 g/day for men and women respectively. Omega-6 fatty acids are also essential, but needs are easily met because top sources, such as vegetable oils like corn, safflower, soy, nut, and seed oils, are used often in vegan cooking.

                    A few people may be able to overhaul completely their eating plan and stick with those changes, but the rest of us will have better chances of success if we take small steps towards our goal.
                    1. Set off towards your ultimate goal of the vegan lifestyle change with a small objective, such as cutting one thing out of your eating plan, red meat, for example. Fish, poultry, dairy, and eggs may still be on your menu, but you need to explore the nearest health food store and start sampling vegan protein sources, such as tofu, seitan, tempeh, legumes, texturized vegetable protein, and meat analogs. The vegan food guide pyramid provides a great picture of a balanced vegan eating plan.
                    2. A week or a month later, when you are comfortable with the changes you have made, take that next step. Cut all meats, fish, and poultry from your eating plan. At this point, eggs and dairy products will be the main animal products, but you need to try out vegan egg replacers, soy cheeses, and soy milks. Start experimenting with one new vegan dish each week; and, check out recipe sources, such as Vegetarian Times or the vegan cookbook section at your local library.
                    3. When you feel that the non-animal portion of your eating plan is diverse and providing adequate amounts of those specific nutrients listed above, take that important step of finally cutting out dairy and eggs. By taking your time to reach the ultimate goal of vegan style eating, you will have eased into new approaches to menu planning and meal preparation. You will also have avoided the waste of a complete overhaul of your refrigerator/freezer contents.
                    Now for those vegan breakfast options that are higher in protein: a typical American breakfast might contain approximately 75 percent of calories from carbohydrate, but we'll aim for less than what you would get from the jumbo bagel, cream cheese, and latte combo that may have lurked in your past…
                    Veggie omelet
                    ¾ cup vegan egg substitute (e.g., General Dietary's Ener-G egg replacer) ½ cup sautéed red/green peppers 1 slice soy cheese salt and pepper 1 slice Whole-wheat toast
                    8 oz. Lowfat soy latte Total Nutrient composition of this meal
                    380 kcals
                    39 g protein
                    13 g fat
                    32 g carbohydrates
                    164 IU Vitamin D
                    464 mg Calcium

                    Alternatively, you could choose specially formulated high protein vegan foods found at health food stores and online.
                    When taking on any important life change goal, it is best to have a clear understanding of the challenges that lie ahead. Adopting a vegan eating plan is such a goal, and it seems as though you are taking on the responsibility of becoming well informed.

                    http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/3053.html
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                      #25
                      I don't really have much to add to this thread, but I have been a vegetarian for about 14 years now. My daughter is 11 and she's been a vegetarian her entire life. I don't force it on her at all, but with both mom and dad being vegetarians, I think it's pretty easy for her. Also, she is a huge animal lover and she can't imagine an animal dying just to satisfy her taste buds.

                      As for health concerns, my daughter has never been terribly sick. And, she's really, really smart. She's in TAG (talented and gifted - they have to take a test), and she has gotten straight A's this year. Also, she has not missed a single day of school this entire year.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Eggs,milk and meat is what the doctors recommended me after my injury.
                        On the side some veggies as well.Beans,broccoli ,carrots etc.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Eileen View Post
                          Yes, the reason I went vege in the first place was because of the factory farming conditions that are abhorrent to even think about, and which clearly cause enormous suffering. On top of that the animals are injected with steroids, growth hormones, and antibiotics, none of which is good for them or the person eating their flesh. Factory farming is one of the most disgusting operations immaginable, with animals routinely abused by bored and neanderthal-like workers. Terrified animals produce Cortisol, a stres hormone (as do we) and some think that isn't exactly in our best interest to be injesting either. I eat lentils and other beans, lots of nuts, fruits and veggies, especially dark green ones like spinach and broccoli that have great nutrient value. I do eat cheese and ice cream, so that is another source of protein for me.
                          Right which is why many older societies developed painless killing techniques. For meat to be Kosher certified, animals have to be slaughtered in adherence to jewish law which forbids the consumption of meat from diseased or suffering animals. I ate kosher meat for a while before finding out that there's some controversy over whether the kosher killing technique is painless.

                          An old uncle of a friend used to raise cows for slaughter but became a vegetarian after seeing diseased animals being forklifted into slaughterhouses because they were too sick to walk. He certainly wasn't an animal lover, just refused to eat meat from sick animals which after processing, is indistinguishable from the meat from a healthy animal.
                          Last edited by antiquity; 13 Apr 2009, 1:33 AM.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by Mona~on~wheels View Post
                            Recently I've been laying off meat but for a totally opposite reason.
                            Unfortunately unless you're buying organic lamb, venison, beef, chicken, etc.,
                            it won't be bambi or a fluffy, little white lamb you're eating.
                            It will be chicken stacked 12 cages high, 4-5 hens packed in each cage.
                            They peck each other to death, feces all over each other falling from the top cage all the way to the bottom. I watched that on Oprah and haven't ate chicken since.
                            Then the cows lay sick, half dead in cages together. No more beef.
                            I want to eat meat but I can't put it in my mouth.
                            There are no stores in my town that sell organic.
                            I went to eating wild salmon but I can only eat so much because of the mercury levels nowadays.
                            I'm living on fruit smoothies (protein mix), organic eggs, and veggies.
                            The 'organic' classification has absolutely nothing to do with humane treatment.
                            Death and taxes

                            Comment


                              #29
                              I am tired of all this meat bashing. I own and run a 1000 head cattle feedlot and 150 calving cows with my 3 hired hands. I would like to invite all of you to my feedlot in Holstein Iowa for a visit. You people focus on the 1 or two bad places because of the news. If you saw the way most people feed cattle you might feel different. I make more money when my cattle are in better shape. Because it will convert the feed better and gain weight faster if the animal is more comfortable in there pens.(like a human couch potato)I can make sure the pens are always clean, I have a canopy in every pen the cattle can get under when it rains or snows, I spread sawdust or cornstalks out in the winter to lay on. Which all helps the ADG average daily gain because the cattle will convert the feed to fat instead of useing it to keep itself warm. So the next time you here lies about cattle feeders give them my email and i will show pictures and first hand accounts. Thank You

                              nvohs@hotmail.com

                              Comment


                                #30
                                from Thrive by Brandon Brazier


                                "The most pervasive myth?: that plant-based diets lack the nutritional completeness of a meat-eater’s diet—especially where calcium, iron and B12 are concerned. This notion is completely unfounded! In fact, the calcium, iron and vitamin B-12 found in plant-based sources are generally more bio-available than those derived from animal products (which means your body can absorb them easily).

                                You can get more than enough calcium, iron and vitamin B-12 from these commonly available foods:
                                Calcium:
                                • Leafy green vegetables (e.g.: kale, chard, arugula or romaine lettuce—also rich sources of other important vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients—not to mention fiber!)
                                • Almonds
                                • Tahini (sesame seed paste)
                                • Unhulled sesame seeds (also high in iron)
                                Iron:
                                • Spinach and leafy greens
                                • Pumpkin seeds
                                • Legumes (especially split peas)
                                • Quinoa
                                B-12:
                                • Miso
                                • Chlorella (a microscopic, freshwater green algae from Japan—this is the best source of B-12!)
                                • Nutritional yeast "


                                I ate no meat products for 4 years and had more energy than any other period in my life. I slept better and therefore needed less sleep. I woke up with energy and felt clear headed all day.
                                I have alot I want to tell you about what I learned about diet - about how it is more than just not eating meat - and about how much better you can feel with the right nutrition but I would just be repeating alot of the Thrive principles so here is a link for some of the basics
                                http://thrivein30.com/_content/lesso...ress-and-diet/
                                C3/4 Brown Sequard

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X