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Good deer meat recipes?

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    #16
    My family LOVES venison!!!

    I usually just cut it up into bite size pieces, fry it in real butter and sprinkle it with some Lawry's seasoning salt.

    We also have some ground up and you can use that instead of hamburger in anything. I put dry ranch dressing and cheese in with the ground venison and that makes a great burger.
    Mom to Heather, age 16, T-12, 8 years post & Michael, age 19.

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      #17
      you can buy a jerky shooter and use ground beef or venison and a dehydrator and make up some good jerky that way to. but the best is with a cold smoker and using strips from the flank.

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        #18
        I turn mine into summer sausage and country sausage (large link type). Mix the venison 60/40 with pork Boston Butts along with some store bought seasonings that are available either at some of the local butcher shops or online. However my favorites are made from the old German family secret recipes that are popular in my neck of the woods. I have my own meat grinder and sausage stuffer so making my own creations is no big deal

        This year I am going to try to make venison bacon this year here is the recipe for it

        Day 1:
        - use 50 – (approx. 12.5 lbs) venison to 50 – (approx. 12.5 lbs.) 80/20 pork/fat.
        - I grind these through the grinder once using a coarse grinder plate, and then do a thorough mix of the meats and then grind one more time through the grinder using a fine grinder plate.
        - Then in a tub, I add the seasoning to the mix, cure, and an ounce of flavor booster and 4 cups of water. This stuff is sticky, reminds me of the perfect meat glue…… The seasoning and flavor booster is a premix that I order from Curley’s Sausage Kitchen online. Then I pack the seasoned meats into tin foil loaf pans (about 2 inches thick, about the width of a slice of bacon) for the meat to set up over night in the refrigerator and firm up. When setting in the fridge, make sure meat is well covered. I use wax paper and set pans on top of each other and will pack 4 or 5 high.

        Day 2:
        - Place meat pan upside down onto your smoking racks and gently remove the meat mixture onto your smoking racks. (This is the point why I like to use tinfoil pans. The consistency of the mixture is very sticky and bending the pans to get the meat loaf mixture out in one piece is easier with a tinfoil pan.)
        - I put it in the smoker at 130 degree’s for an hour with no smoke and damper wide open for drying purposes.
        - Then add smoke and move up to 160 degree’s for 2 hours with the damper half open.
        - Then I remove the smoke and move up to 180 degree for about 4 more hours. I remove it from the smoker when the internal temperature reaches 155 degree’s. I have moved up to 200 degree’s with no problems if getting the internal temperature of 155 is taking too long.
        - Take out and let meat cool, then I bag the meat loafs separately and again, refrigerate over night.
        Last edited by nevada; 25 Nov 2008, 5:50 PM. Reason: spelling

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          #19
          For some of the larger cuts you might want to slow cook try to marinate them in a balsamic vinegar/olive oil mix with some crushed black pepper. Oh, in the fridge overnight is best. Drain and turn it into a normal roast/pot roast in the oven or slow cooker. The marinade also helps with other cuts if the meat is really on the wild side--marinade, drain, rinse, grind for hamburgers, etc. And you don't need an expensive/fancy balsamic vinegar for this unless you add fresh to the roast instead of red wine or stock.

          And they think cheeseheads only eat brats.
          Courage doesn't always roar. Sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying, "I will try again tomorrow."

          Disclaimer: Answers, suggestions, and/or comments do not constitute medical advice expressed or implied and are based solely on my experiences as a SCI patient. Please consult your attending physician for medical advise and treatment. In the event of a medical emergency please call 911.

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            #20
            if you have ground deer meat, try putting it into some hamburger helper. It always tastes great that way.
            -Enjoy life, you only live once.
            Marketing & Advertising Sites Directory

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              #21
              Originally posted by NorthQuad View Post
              ewwweeey... yucky poo. I've tried that. I nearly slapped the dink-hole that offered me some. It was one of my friends that brought some when we were out hunting back in the day. It was in a jar. I think it was boiled/cooked right in the jar. So nasty. I bet that deer turds taste better.
              Dave, come on man, you're a hunter. That's THE best part of a deer without question. Sweet meat is the inside tenderloins from a deer and the most tender. Absolutely wonderful on the grill.

              Not sure how your buddies did it, but if you didn't like it, they didn't do it right.
              "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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                #22
                Originally posted by DeadEye View Post
                Dave, come on man, you're a hunter. That's THE best part of a deer without question. Sweet meat is the inside tenderloins from a deer and the most tender. Absolutely wonderful on the grill.

                Not sure how your buddies did it, but if you didn't like it, they didn't do it right.
                Oh it was bad. lol.

                I almost called the cops, I swear. Whatever animal it was that went in the jar before being cooked must have been ashamed of what it had become. I'm certain.

                I'm sure the animal would have been much prouder had it been roasted on the grill.

                Beware of unmarked meat jars.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by NorthQuad View Post
                  Oh it was bad. lol.

                  I almost called the cops, I swear. Whatever animal it was that went in the jar before being cooked must have been ashamed of what it had become. I'm certain.

                  I'm sure the animal would have been much prouder had it been roasted on the grill.

                  Beware of unmarked meat jars.
                  eewwww, that sounds more like Street-Meat(ie: roadkill) than Sweet-Meat.
                  "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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                    #24
                    I have some back strap to cook someone brought me. What is a good marinade that's not too hot or spicy. I'm looking for something to add just a little flavor.

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                      #25
                      Heath, I usually just marinade it in red wine, (saving a couple glasses for me) and garlic. People often put too much stuff in there and it messes with the taste of the meat.

                      Cut it across the loin in strips 3/8" thick, and cook it in bacon grease or olive oil. You can bread it in flour if you like but I prefer it without. DO NOT overcook it. Just a couple minutes on each side and it's done.
                      "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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                        #26
                        A friend I hunted with last weekend just sent me this. He swears it's the best thing ever.

                        BUL-GO-GI
                        Korean Fire Venison

                        1 ½ to 2 pounds venison (Tenderloin is best but any good cut will do)
                        ( Can also be made with Chicken, Pork or Beef)
                        3 cloves garlic, minced
                        1 medium onion or 3 green onions, chopped
                        *½ hot red pepper, finely chopped or generous dash of tabasco sauce (Optional)
                        ¼ cup Oriental sesame oil
                        ½ cup soy sauce
                        ½ cup Lea and Perrins (any other is OK) Worcestershire sauce
                        *3 tablespoons sugar (optional)
                        Combine the above as a marinade.

                        Cut meat into bacon thin slices. (Best to do when meat is frozen but slightly thawed) Place into a deep glass dish, pour marinade over and let stand refrigerated for 3 or 4 hours. (We have let it marinade for 2 or 3 days!! If refrigerated it is great!!).

                        Outdoors:
                        Place meat on a fine mesh grill over hot coals. (Coals should be glowing). Brush frequently with the marinade sauce. Grill uncovered 4 to 5 minutes or until meat starts to stiffen. Turn and brush again. Meat is medium rare when the color turns chocolate brown. DO NOT OVERCOOK!! (However if you do, carefully let it dry out and it makes a good “Jerky”)
                        "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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                          #27
                          I don't want to seem too minimalist but Mr. Yoshita's marinated over night and cooked on an open pit fire..........MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM.

                          http://www.mryoshidas.com/

                          You can also pick it up at Costco by the Half Gallon!

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                            #28
                            Hey dead eye, I gotta relate this story to ya. When I got my 5X6 bull elk 5 yrs ago, we hauled it home(skinned in the field, and hung to cool) , we do our own cutting. I ended up with meat once from a shop I knew wasn't mine. We have a friend who owned an old country style butcher shop, so we call him, cause that's a bit bigger job than a whitetail. he's cuttin' and stackin' and seperatin', I'm wrapping and boneing when I can, and all of a sudden he goes well, hows that look for a tenderloin? HOOOLLLYY crap, I turned around, there laid a slab, or rather a round slab of meat, 6-8" in diameter and around 4 ft long. Thoughts of icredible meals ran thru my mind. Wow, cut into 2" thick medallions, slight dust of flour, little garlic, olive oil, hot cast iron skillet, 3 min ea side. Died and gone to heaven.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by fishin'guy View Post
                              .. hows that look for a tenderloin? HOOOLLLYY crap, I turned around, there laid a slab, or rather a round slab of meat, 6-8" in diameter and around 4 ft long. Thoughts of icredible meals ran thru my mind. Wow, cut into 2" thick medallions, slight dust of flour, little garlic, olive oil, hot cast iron skillet, 3 min ea side. Died and gone to heaven.
                              Now THAT is a tenderloin. I bet it was awesome. I'd love to lay my 7mag or 300 out on a big ol' bull.
                              "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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