Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Getting Toddler in and out of Car Seat

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Getting Toddler in and out of Car Seat

    Hi all,

    My husband is a newly injured T4 and we are beginning to research new options for transportation. We are torn between the Subaru Outback and a wheelchair accessible Honda Element. The main area of concern for my husband in regards to the Outback is whether or not he'd be able to get our 20 month old daughter in and out of her carseat on his own. Prior to the accident, he was responsible for daycare drop off and pick up, and he'd like to return to that at some point. What are your thoughts? Any experience one way or the other?

    Thanks!

    #2
    Originally posted by acleyba View Post
    Hi all,

    My husband is a newly injured T4 and we are beginning to research new options for transportation. We are torn between the Subaru Outback and a wheelchair accessible Honda Element. The main area of concern for my husband in regards to the Outback is whether or not he'd be able to get our 20 month old daughter in and out of her carseat on his own. Prior to the accident, he was responsible for daycare drop off and pick up, and he'd like to return to that at some point. What are your thoughts? Any experience one way or the other?

    Thanks!
    Well for what it is worth I am a T8 and have no problems with things like getting a kid in and out of a car seat. You don't say how newly injured but in the early stages of being injured a lot of things seem impossible that turn out to be doable once you get adjusted to being in a chair. I would go for the Outback, a para doesn't need a wheelchair accessible car (I have a mini cooper)

    Comment


      #3
      He's about 4 months post-injury, so still quite new. He's got a good amount of sensory and motor control below the level of injury (motor to hip flexors, sensation to waist or so), so I think he could handle it. Our daughter, though, is not always the most cooperative when it comes to getting in her car seat...I think that worries him more than anything else. It's good to know that it's not an unreasonable thing for him to aspire to do. We're not planning on buying the new car for another 4 months or so, so he should be even stronger by then.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by acleyba View Post
        He's about 4 months post-injury, so still quite new. He's got a good amount of sensory and motor control below the level of injury (motor to hip flexors, sensation to waist or so), so I think he could handle it. Our daughter, though, is not always the most cooperative when it comes to getting in her car seat...I think that worries him more than anything else. It's good to know that it's not an unreasonable thing for him to aspire to do. We're not planning on buying the new car for another 4 months or so, so he should be even stronger by then.
        Oh, he will be fine. Four months is still really new to all this. I am complete and don't have any problems, and trust me my kid is a handful!

        Comment


          #5
          Get the van. although a station wagon is "doable", a van makes it much easier on everyone. There will be many difficult hurdles in your future- why no eliminate those you can? If you live in a cold/wet environment, it is a pain to load a child and yourself in a car during a freezing rain.

          As a father of two, trust me. My youngest was three months old at the time of my accident, and upgrading to a van from my Honda CRV made it so much easier to get my daughters out and about completely independently.

          Dave
          Dave

          Comment


            #6
            http://www.youtube.com/user/Ridimblu.../1/GlqyUBNl3ng

            Shows a new mum using a turn a tot carseat

            Comment


              #7
              agree with hurco. get the van. i am a t-12. we have an old chevy venture with the middle seats removed. twin girls that are almost 4 now.. plenty of room for me to transfer in and roll around and not lose the chair. just like anything else wheelchair involved, the more real estate you have the better.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by acleyba View Post
                He's about 4 months post-injury, so still quite new. He's got a good amount of sensory and motor control below the level of injury (motor to hip flexors, sensation to waist or so), so I think he could handle it. Our daughter, though, is not always the most cooperative when it comes to getting in her car seat...I think that worries him more than anything else. It's good to know that it's not an unreasonable thing for him to aspire to do. We're not planning on buying the new car for another 4 months or so, so he should be even stronger by then.
                She'll get it. Bribing works. My "kids" learned quick to assist. We are down to one booster seat, yikes I'm getting old!
                Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by smirking1 View Post
                  agree with hurco. get the van. i am a t-12. we have an old chevy venture with the middle seats removed. twin girls that are almost 4 now.. plenty of room for me to transfer in and roll around and not lose the chair. just like anything else wheelchair involved, the more real estate you have the better.
                  Interesting. Are you saying get a van with a ramp, or just a van because with kids and a chair it is easier to have more room? A ramp just seems like more trouble than it is worth to me, but I have to admit I have never had a car that has one.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I have a Outback, I'm a L4/L5 about 16 months post op. Outback's and Foresters are awesome vechicles but not alot of extra room after the carseat. We put the childseat in the middle and reaching in to undo the belts is a little difficult at times. I find after an hour of driving my back starts to ache pretty good. I think it's because of the seat, with all the adjustments it still kinda at the wrong angle. I would check out the Forester, easier to get into. Herco16 may be right, a van might be a better buy.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Thanks for all the feedback. We're going to the Abilities Expo in San Jose in a few weeks and will check out some of the converted vehicles at that point. I'm leaning more towards the outback (or perhaps another car...we're planning on looking around a bit more), but I ultimately want to do what is going to be best for Jason, and if that's a van, we'll get a van.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by t8burst View Post
                        Interesting. Are you saying get a van with a ramp, or just a van because with kids and a chair it is easier to have more room? A ramp just seems like more trouble than it is worth to me, but I have to admit I have never had a car that has one.
                        "a wheelchair accessible Honda Element" is what she said, but I called it a van. I'm assuming it would have a ramp. It was just so much easier to get the kids in and out, especially during bad weather, with my van. And the additional room, as mentioned by Smirking1, when packing for trips or something is an added bonus.

                        Conduct a little test- Wait for a cold day, then spray a garden hose straight into the air over the subaru as your husband approaches, loads your child, then loads himself into it. Then do the same with a van if possible. Which one do you think he'd prefer? lol

                        I'm spoiled- I love my van for what it did for me and my kids when they were young. It enabled me to be a fully independent father of two (3 and 1) w/o adding additional hardships because of the SCI. As my kids aged I bought a car in addition to the van. We use the car most of the time, but if the weather is bad, or I want to take my power chair somewhere with them, I take the van. But, if I had to choose one vehicle to keep, it would definitely be the van. It may be worse on gas, but it's much more versatile.

                        (I don't care how "disabled" it makes me look- people figure that out as I roll my ass to the front door anyway ;-)
                        Dave

                        Comment


                          #13
                          With a four month old injury and a two year old child, this is no time for testing the bar on what he "might be able to handle." Get the van/element.

                          There are times to "go for it," and there are times to choose the path of least resistance. This instance is the latter.
                          And the truth shall set you free.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by acleyba View Post
                            Thanks for all the feedback. We're going to the Abilities Expo in San Jose in a few weeks and will check out some of the converted vehicles at that point. I'm leaning more towards the outback (or perhaps another car...we're planning on looking around a bit more), but I ultimately want to do what is going to be best for Jason, and if that's a van, we'll get a van.
                            I will be there are well! Want to check out the new Icon wheelchairs...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Herco16 View Post
                              "a wheelchair accessible Honda Element" is what she said, but I called it a van. I'm assuming it would have a ramp. It was just so much easier to get the kids in and out, especially during bad weather, with my van. And the additional room, as mentioned by Smirking1, when packing for trips or something is an added bonus.

                              Conduct a little test- Wait for a cold day, then spray a garden hose straight into the air over the subaru as your husband approaches, loads your child, then loads himself into it. Then do the same with a van if possible. Which one do you think he'd prefer? lol

                              I'm spoiled- I love my van for what it did for me and my kids when they were young. It enabled me to be a fully independent father of two (3 and 1) w/o adding additional hardships because of the SCI. As my kids aged I bought a car in addition to the van. We use the car most of the time, but if the weather is bad, or I want to take my power chair somewhere with them, I take the van. But, if I had to choose one vehicle to keep, it would definitely be the van. It may be worse on gas, but it's much more versatile.

                              (I don't care how "disabled" it makes me look- people figure that out as I roll my ass to the front door anyway ;-)
                              Yah, I am not worried about looking disabled either. Like you say the wheelchair gives that away anyway. My "family" car is a GMC Yukon with a bruno lift and I just worry that a ramp limits where you can park. It would be nice to be able to borrow a car with a ramp just to try it out, it is a lot of money to spend if it isn't needed or even makes life more complicated.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X