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  • Paralyzed & Pregnant on Discovery Health

    It follows Michelle (quad) and hubby through their pregnancy and birth.

    Click for the air times: http://health.discovery.com/tv-sched...480.116988.0.0

  • #2
    I'm excited to watch it!
    Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

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    • #3
      bump

      It's on today.
      Aerodynamically, the bumble bee shouldn't be able to fly, but the bumble bee doesn't know that, so it goes on flying anyways--Mary Kay Ash

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      • #4
        I watched that earlier in the week and it was very interesting. One thing that shocked me was that she had a vaginal birth, even though she's a quadraplegic (from what I've heard, quads only get c-sections, due to pushing muscles that are extremely weak).

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        • #5
          Jesse-
          who did you hear that from? Do you know any quadriplegics who have given birth? I am one, and have spoken to quite a few others and we have all had vaginal births. As it turns out, uterine contractions are involuntary and bypass the spinal cord and do most of the work. The pelvic muscles, which are used for voluntary pushing are actually more relaxed and sometimes can ease the baby's passage through the birth canal (although not always-as in Michelle's case where she needed a vacuum assist). In my case, my baby was small-6 lbs. 2 oz.-and I guess I was made for making babies, because she just slipped out pretty much on her own. My doctor is quite ready to use that vacuum, but luckily my baby had other ideas. Her head was fully delivered before anybody even realized it, and her body probably would've slipped out if her cord hadn't stopped her. I think doctors get a little freaked out by the quadriplegic birthing and rush things, maybe jumping to use tools a little too quickly, and not trusting the body to perform as it was intended.

          Gurly-
          have you seen it yet, what did you think? I was a little freaked out by that show. Luckily, I saw it after I had become pregnant, because I don't know if I would've done it after. It seems she is giving up lots to have a baby of her own. Please remember all pregnancies are different, able-bodied or spinal cord injured. Mine turned out pretty good except for the pneumonia at six months, and the ridiculous amount of UTIs I had to deal with. I would encourage other women with spinal cord injuries to have babies if they want-but one is definitely enough for me.
          "We must become the change we want to see in the world." Gandhi

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          • #6
            I've also had 2 pretty much uncomplicated pregnancies and 2 easy vaginal births.
            Emily, C-8 sensory incomplete mom to a 8 year old and a preschooler. TEN! years post.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jessie.gray
              I watched that earlier in the week and it was very interesting. One thing that shocked me was that she had a vaginal birth, even though she's a quadraplegic (from what I've heard, quads only get c-sections, due to pushing muscles that are extremely weak).
              it was pointed out on the show that uterine contractions are involuntary so one does not need to have muscle control for the body to move the baby down the birth canal.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by alissa

                Gurly-
                have you seen it yet, what did you think? I was a little freaked out by that show. Luckily, I saw it after I had become pregnant, because I don't know if I would've done it after. It seems she is giving up lots to have a baby of her own. Please remember all pregnancies are different, able-bodied or spinal cord injured. Mine turned out pretty good except for the pneumonia at six months, and the ridiculous amount of UTIs I had to deal with. I would encourage other women with spinal cord injuries to have babies if they want-but one is definitely enough for me.

                No, I wasn't able to watch it. I have cable, but I don't have that channel! I'm excited to have babies(2 max) someday...not anyday soon tho!
                Life is like a box of chocolates, you never know what you're gonna get.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jessie.gray
                  I watched that earlier in the week and it was very interesting. One thing that shocked me was that she had a vaginal birth, even though she's a quadraplegic (from what I've heard, quads only get c-sections, due to pushing muscles that are extremely weak).
                  not a quad, obviously. and not informed. how many paras do ya think have "pushing muscles?" this reminds me of a post i made a few yrs back and a member slammed me for. i've known many paralyzed moms, me included, many have had easier births due to muscles not fighting it. papers are written on it.

                  btw, most quadriplegics have no muscles below c7 (definition), not weak muscles. good grief, my son was born at loma linda in 1992. it was fully expected in 1992 i would have a normal, vaginal delivery. the issue is ad. i had epidural to stop that. even tho i told my t6 friend, 6 months later, no epidural and she had severe ad.
                  Last edited by cass; 10-06-2008, 04:56 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jessie.gray
                    thing that shocked me was that she had a vaginal birth, even though she's a quadraplegic (from what I've heard, quads only get c-sections, due to pushing muscles that are extremely weak).
                    C-sections have become entirely too common in this country, whether they be for AB women or disabled women. This is not a good thing.

                    C.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Tiger Racing
                      C-sections have become entirely too common in this country, whether they be for AB women or disabled women. This is not a good thing.

                      C.
                      My aunt was in charge of a Canadian maternity unit for over 30 years and she has always held C-sections in higher regard. Based on her numerous experiences, she believes it is less stressful for baby and oftentimes a lot safer for the mother.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Tiger Racing
                        C-sections have become entirely too common in this country, whether they be for AB women or disabled women. This is not a good thing.

                        C.
                        why not, exactly? they use a very small cut, outta hospital in 2 days, no long labor. kid is fine, mom even better. why do you say not a good thing?

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                        • #13
                          Because it's surgery. I had 2 and I wasn't out of the hospital in 2 days, try 4 and I wasn't fine. I had lots of pain, couldn't pick anything up and couldn't get around well for a couple of weeks. Not to mention they tell you not to drive for a month.


                          A woman considering cesarean section should be told that, compared to vaginal birth, she has an increased risk of infection, hemorrhage, damage to abdominal and urinary tract organs, and complications from anesthesia/narcotics. She needs to know that the incidence of drug resistant infections is increasing and blood transfusions can lead to life threatening complications.

                          The researchers noted that vaginal birth is beneficial to the baby. During this process, hormones are released promoting healthy lung function. The physical compression of the baby moving through the vaginal canal also helps remove fluid from the lungs and helps infants in breathing.
                          Last edited by I Care; 10-06-2008, 07:59 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by I Care
                            Because it's surgery. I had 2 and I wasn't out of the hospital in 2 days, try 4 and I wasn't fine. I had lots of pain, couldn't pick anything up and couldn't get around well for a couple of weeks. Not to mention they tell you not to drive for a month.
                            All new mothers should take it easy. I can't tell you the amount of horror stories I've heard re. tearing of the perineum, multiple stitches, forceps complications etc.

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                            • #15
                              c section these days is a small cut. not like yrs ago. mayo clinic quotes 3 days in hospital. btw, i had emergency c section with full vertical cut, after hours of labor i hemorrhaged due to placenta previa. i wasn't in hospital long and had no long recovery period at all. in fact, was back in my chair wheeling around in a few days. had the c section been planned, i would have been up sooner because i would not have lost so much blood.

                              mayo clinic:

                              Sometimes a Caesarean birth (C-section) is safer for mother or baby than is a vaginal delivery. Whether your C-section happens unexpectedly or you've planned it months in advance, you may be anxious about the experience. Here's what to expect during the C-section — and how to promote recovery afterward.

                              http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/c-section/PR00101
                              Last edited by cass; 10-06-2008, 08:28 AM.

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