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    PT with Wii

    http://www.livescience.com/health/08...i-therapy.html



    CHICAGO (AP) -- Some call it "Wiihabilitation.''Nintendo's Wii video game system, whose popularity already extends beyond theteen gaming set, is fast becoming a craze in rehab therapy for patientsrecovering from strokes, broken bones, surgery and even combat injuries.
    The usual stretching and lifting exercises that help thesick or injured regain strength can be painful, repetitive and downrightboring.
    In fact, many patients say PT -- physical therapy'snickname -- really stands for "pain and torture,'' said James Osborn, whooversees rehabilitation services at Herrin Hospital in southern Illinois.
    Using the game console's unique, motion-sensitivecontroller, Wii games require body movements similar to traditional therapyexercises. But patients become so engrossed mentally they're almost obliviousto the rigor, Osborn said.
    "In the Wii system, because it's kind of a gameformat, it does create this kind of inner competitiveness. Even though you maybe boxing or playing tennis against some figure on the screen, it's amazing howmany of our patients want to beat their opponent,'' said Osborn of SouthernIllinois Healthcare, which includes the hospital in Herrin. The hospital, about100 miles southeast of St. Louis, bought a Wii system for rehab patients latelast year.
    "When people can refocus their attention from thetediousness of the physical task, oftentimes they do much better,'' Osbornsaid.
    Nintendo Co. doesn't market Wii's potential use inphysical therapy, but company representative Anka Dolecki said, "We are happyto see that people are finding added benefit in rehabilitation.''
    The most popular Wii games in rehab involve sports --baseball, bowling, boxing, golf and tennis. Using the same arm swings requiredby those sports, players wave a wireless controller that directs the actions ofanimated athletes on the screen.
    The Hines Veterans Affairs Hospital west of Chicagorecently bought a Wii system for its spinal cord injury unit.

    Pfc. Matthew Turpen, 22, paralyzed from the chest down ina car accident last year while stationed in Germany, plays Wii golf and bowlingfrom his wheelchair at Hines. The Des Moines, Iowa, native says the games helpbeat the monotony of rehab and seem to be doing his body good, too.
    "A lot of guys don't have full finger function so itdefinitely helps being able to work on using your fingers more and figuring outdifferent ways to use your hands'' and arms, Turpen said.
    At Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the therapy iswell-suited to patients injured during combat in Iraq, who tend to be in the 19to 25 age range -- a group that's "very into'' playing video games, saidLt. Col. Stephanie Daugherty, Walter Reed's chief of occupational therapy.
    "They think it's for entertainment, but we know it'sfor therapy,'' she said.
    "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

    #2
    My mom is an activities director at a long-term rehab facility in Wisconsin, and she uses Wii there too. She says she cannot believe the difference in the people she works with when they are playing the game. They focus on having fun and focus less on what is wrong with them. I wish they had this kind of therapy when I was first diagnosed!
    "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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      #3
      A friend of mine has been gently pushing me to go Wii for the exercise. I workout, but it can get kind of boring in the winter as activity moves indoors. I'm told that if I can get the controller attached to my hand I'll be able to move my arm, get exercise and have fun.

      I hope I'll be able to play tennis in my apartment. Whoddathunkit, eh?

      Comment


        #4
        I´m getting it for my practice and will put it through the motions.

        Wheelie would you mind asking your Mom which games her participants get the most feedback from? Thanks.
        "So I have stayed as I am, without regret, seperated from the normal human condition." Guy Sajer

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          #5
          Wii PT

          We have incorporated the Wii into my son's PT program. Part of his PT is to practice standing. We've added the Wii to that because it takes his mind off standing and often encourages him to stand longer. We have found that some games work better than others -- bowling is good -- he really enjoys it and his goal is to stand and play for 15 minutes without a break. Right now he can do about 7 minutes. But he has great fun in the process.
          Ugh, I've been kissed by a dog!
          Get some hot water, get some iodine ...
          -- Lucy VanPelt

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Mike C
            Wheelie would you mind asking your Mom which games her participants get the most feedback from? Thanks.
            She said the sports package mostly...bowling, boxing, and tennis seem to be the favorites of the ones she is working with and also seems to be paying the most dividends. Some of the older crowd loves the golfing one (makes them feel like they are on the course), so she can convince them to play that and get some range of motion going there.
            "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

            Comment


              #7
              my son got a wii for christmas and i thought it was going to be just another video game system. he has some motor skill deficiencies and even though he played xbox and playstation, he didnt do very well with the games. with his wii he is doing a great job which i am guessing it is due to the movement and physical involvement in the games. the before mentioned sports game is great for him. i dont know if it would help or not, but there is a fairly inexpensive bundle (35) you can buy to go with that game that has controllers that are more like the sports equipment. for example, a tennis racket to go with the tennis game. he wants that for his birthday next month because he thinks it would be easier with those controllers. these controllers are "nerf" so i would think they would be easy to hold on to as well. you can see them here....

              http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=8217112

              Comment


                #8
                I got one over Christmas and its awesome. The Wii sports are the easiest because its just 1 button and a WHOLE lot of swinging. I have a hard time w/most of the other games except for tiger woods golf, thats my favorite.
                Say what you mean and mean what you say because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind.

                My Myspace


                Comment


                  #9
                  Here's a thread that's about the wii.

                  /forum/showthread.php?t=73098

                  Comment


                    #10
                    We have a wii here at SCI-Step and have seen a great results with both upper body and cardio endurance-everyone loves to box!

                    Michele
                    www.sci-step.com

                    Comment


                      #11
                      wii fit for health and recovery

                      Hi,

                      Here is an important tip to use wii fit for the fitness and also for speedy reocovery from injuries.

                      Wii Fit takes this into consideration by offering four basic types of categories to train in: strength, yoga, aerobics, and balance. Each category works to benefit mind, body, and spirit in different exercises and motions. To help video game players out, the kind makers of Wii Fit have also made the Wii Balance Board. This peripheral enables consumers to weigh themselves, calculate body mass, measure center of gravity, and do a number of other things.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by smith99 View Post
                        Hi,

                        Here is an important tip to use wii fit for the fitness and also for speedy reocovery from injuries.

                        Wii Fit takes this into consideration by offering four basic types of categories to train in: strength, yoga, aerobics, and balance. Each category works to benefit mind, body, and spirit in different exercises and motions. To help video game players out, the kind makers of Wii Fit have also made the Wii Balance Board. This peripheral enables consumers to weigh themselves, calculate body mass, measure center of gravity, and do a number of other things.
                        This is all well and good but the balance board does not help someone with an injury which keeps them from standing on it. You cannot get good readings on weight or on your level of balance, and just try doing some of those games from your chair. It is not helpful for people like me (I know...I have tried).
                        "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

                        Comment


                          #13
                          wheeliecoach, I know what you mean! We have a WiiFit, and I can manage to do a few of the balance exercises by sitting on it, but most of the activities just don't work. I try to focus on using the other games, but I usually use it more for fun than fitness.

                          I wish there was a wii fit pad that was like the pressure mapping pad, something soft you could sit on it your chair!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Wiihab!

                            You can sit on the board to do some games but you need to be able to get yourself from your chair to the floor or have someone to help.

                            I had stopped playing on my games consoles until the wii came out. I orginally got mario and zelda with it but as my fine motor skills have progressed over the last few years I struggle to play those now. It can take me an hour to just complete one small part if it involves alot of jumping from platform to platform or switching between weapons alot in zelda.

                            I was about to sell mine when wii fit was been released and it mentioned a section on balance exercises (I have ataxia - balance & co-ordination problems). As it was £70 my mate bought it first for her kids but brought it round to show me so we could see if I could manage to do the exercises with the walking frame around the wii board. I could manage enough of them to do an half hour routine so decided to buy wii fit for myself instead of selling the wii console.

                            Best decision I made! Had it a few years now I can do alot more of the exercises then I could orginally, particuarly I can stand for longer with support (also have leg splints which I take off before i weigh myself!) I have also found those wrist weights useful too for steadying my arms (I have some slight involuntary movements when trying to do an action).

                            I use the wii fit to exercise legs for standing/balance exercises and use wii sports to give my arms a good workout (from sitting in w/c for better stability) for tennis and boxing. For some games i can also play from sitting on a beancube with legs at each side or in "W' shape on floor as you did as kids. I found that has also helped strenghten back and core muscles and helped my sitting balance.

                            There has still been progression but I think the fact that i can still do as much as I can for myself is from doing these exercises everyday because the wii makes physio fun.

                            I now choose games depending on what parts of body/brain they exercise and try and choose a variety between ones that exercise fine motor skills, upper arms like tennis based games etc or wii ski i can manage the slalom part on wii fit board as it starts you off and you only have to lean left or right. (adventure part you need to hold nunchuk and wii remote as well even if using balance board so no free hands if you need to hang on to something!) the rest of the game I play from sitting.

                            There are quite a few new fitness based games coming out so it would be interesting to see if any of them could have enough exercises you could adapt to do from wheelchair as well?

                            My fitness trainer has a yoga section and as you dont need to hold a controller you could do your own versions of what she is doing. However there's alot of jumping about in all other sections which it maybe hard to find an alternative for. It does split the workouts though into upper body, lower body, core muscles, yoga, stretching or something.

                            I thought I had heard a rumour about Korinopa 2 been brought out with balance board compatibility, and it working in a similar way to the table tilt game on wii fit. so you are just practising standing and leaning from left to right to tilt balls around a maze. Thought that would be a good one for ataxia. Is it out in US yet?

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                              #15
                              My wife's PT used it with her the other week.
                              I think it would be excellent for her arm & shoulder ROM.
                              - Richard

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