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    Taking the dog for a walk?

    I miss taking my dog for a walk and I need the exercise so i want to use my manual chair instead of the scooter. I'm sure there is someone out there that has a simple answer that I am overlooking. Trying to hold the collar in one hand just doesn't cut it. My dog only weighs 45 lbs but he is a stout shar pei that is strong enough to pull me around if he gets too close to the road or decides to chase a squirrel.

    #2
    ha,ha..I could tell you the nightmare story of me and my staffy a week after my lamenectomy or I could give you some quik advice..

    I'll save the nightmare for later (actually funny now)

    have a lead that is about 6-8 ft make sure your dog walks well on a leash and pray to the gods he/she does not take you for the ride of your life.

    there are several ppl on here that have service dogs, I'm sure they will jump in and give a bit of advice

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      #3
      I have two leashes...a 6 foot leash that I wrap around my hand a couple of times so that she cannot pull...and a retractable leash. My boyfriend ties the 6 foot leash to his chair. My dog has learned her boundaries...and knows she cannot go bolting off with us. It took some training...but she learned. She is 46 pounds too...so...if she can learn...any doggie can!
      "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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        #4
        I attach Wonder Dog to my chair with a leash. She has learned to stay to one side and not pull. She keeps her pace to match mine.

        When I roll faster outdoors she gets uber excited and always barks her approval.

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          #5
          Go for it!

          Piece of cake, pit bulldogs, Rottweilers and now my black lab. Shar pei is usually damn smart animal, shouldn't be a problem using verbal commands, maybe tug the leash occasionally. Practice, practice on deserted roads or trails etc.. Enjoy, it's about the only thing that gets me out of the house.
          get busy living or get busy dying

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            #6
            My dog, Fuzzy, she took to a leash and hung with me like she was trianed to do it.I got her when she was a puppy in WV. She has also got me out of some places or I would have been stuck. In FL, we go just a getting it. The neighbors stop and watch us. The bad thing where I live is other people's dogs attacking us. I have a Rascal now. We go way out in the woods. And I have a little dog that goes too.(Scooter)

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              #7
              My little guy pulls my chair like a carriage. He's 15 pounds. Be wary of tying a 45 pound dog to your chair, I knew a guy in PT that broke his hip via Dalmation. Dog walking is my life LOL, I wish it would warm up!
              Blog:
              Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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                #8
                Thank you Betheny, I was starting to think I had the only stubborn dog around. My husband has never tried walking the dog with his chair but I do use a "pincher" collar on mine. Its not a choker but it actually pinches the skin if they pull too hard on the lead. It only took my dog twice to learn not to pull. I have an Austrailan cattle dog and they are stubborn and strong - works like a charm.

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                  #9
                  I used a retractable leash with my old dog. He was nearly 100 lbs and could pull me over if he went after a rabbit. The training years were fun. Once the bugs got worked out he really was an amazing help. He could pull me all over the place and quite fast. He helped dig snow if I got stuck. He'd pick things up. I could go on and on. I miss that old dog.

                  Anyways, the retractable has a handhold, I wrapped a rag around the handle so that there was a narrow opening. Then I shoved it onto the wheelchair arm. If I wanted him to pull I would grab the line and shake it then say pull.
                  Andrew

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                    #10
                    Thanks for the posts....he's pretty good on a leash but he thinks every smell, sound or animal/person is a potential security threat and has to investigate it.
                    Quadvet yes shar pei's are smart....unbelievable how smart they are..but stubborn like I can't believe. When he gets mad he sits down so he can barely see you out of the corner of his eye and grunts.....like a pouting little kid. They are great animals and I would have a hard time getting one from another breed.
                    I like the idea of the retractable leash on the arm, but i don't have arms or back handles on my new chair....I'll have to rig something up to hook it to the chair....Thanks again everyone

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                      #11
                      Sometimes I put a belt on and hook the leash to it. Again, only if your dog is small or VERY controllable.
                      Blog:
                      Does This Wheelchair Make My Ass Look Fat?

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                        #12
                        Get a prong (not "choke") collar and get someone else to work with him for a couple of days: put the collar on, and start walking. When the dog starts to pull, the person does an about face and the dog gets a sudden wake up and has to turn. A couple of times and the dog learns that leading = about face, walking nice = walking. Properly fitted, a prong collar does NOT hurt the dog, they don't choke and gag like the choker collar, and WILL stop the pulling. Once the dog learns the collar, you can control him easily. But, if you're still unsure, I would NEVER hook the dog to the chair, you need to be able to get away fast, you don't want to be face down in a neighbor's yard because the dog saw a squirrel.
                        The next step, if you're interested, is to teach the difference in walk and pull and have the dog pull you using a harness (never his collar).
                        Our Dobe was like a sled dog, now she walks calmly beside anyone. It can be done and doesn't take long. If you have good hand function, you can do it alonem if not you may need some help to be safe.
                        BeeBee

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                          #13
                          I used a similar technique with the leash on the chair. I locked the retractable to a short distance. Just before my dog got to the end of his rope I would say no pull, heel. I wanted him to learn to stay close on the lead and not to pull. It worked fairly well. His bump at the end of the rope would pull the chair a little, I would slow the opposite wheel so that the momentum of the chair was tipped in. Then his bump would straighten the chairs turn. Easy! </IMG>
                          Andrew

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                            #14
                            Gentle Leaders work much better than choke collars or prong collars to teach a dog not to pull and they don't harm the dog. They not only teach the dog not to pull but also if you have a dog that likes to walk with his nose down and eat food off the sidewalk it will help with that too.
                            http://www.premier.com/pages.cfm?id=17
                            We have had good results with both our dogs and gentle leaders.
                            C3/4 Brown Sequard

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by AlexAgain
                              Gentle Leaders work much better than choke collars or prong collars to teach a dog not to pull and they don't harm the dog. They not only teach the dog not to pull but also if you have a dog that likes to walk with his nose down and eat food off the sidewalk it will help with that too.
                              http://www.premier.com/pages.cfm?id=17
                              We have had good results with both our dogs and gentle leaders.
                              Yes, gentle leaders are very good training tools. It gives you control of the dog's head and where his head goes, the rest will follow. Also, the "following" exercise is an excellent technique. Not only does the dog learn to walk nicely on a leash, he learns to accept you as the pack leader in general.

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