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    #16
    Thanks, Spinalnurse. You continually teach us something new.

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      #17
      Sorry been so long was super sick with some type of virual infection. To answer your question Dan I would agree with Mr. Coffee. My personal definition of 100% recovery is being able to do all that I was able to do before.

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        #18
        Originally posted by 05survivor
        Does anyone know the probability/possibility of complete recovery? Has it ever happened? What are the determining factors of a 100% recovery? Any guesses, comments, knowledge greatly appreciated. Thanks. T-4 incomplete 03-08-05.
        I just met a guy who is a xray student at a local hospital and we started chatting, he finally said so what are you a c4-5-6? I answered yes and had noticed he had two dimples in his forehead so I asked him if he had a halo. He told me he dislocated c4,5,6 ten years ago in a tumbling accident. He lived in a small town in New York and said they got him to a local hospital in about an hour where they started steroid therapy. A top nuro doc had just started at that hospital so they paged him right away and he took over his care. This guy had surgery (we compaired scars) and was a complete quad for a few weeks both loss of feeling and movement. He had 100% recovery and knows how luckey he is, I wish we could have talked longer but he was working.

        ^^(A)^^
        ^^(A)^^

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          #19
          I've seen quads where their verbra where completely shattered or dislocated but they never touched the spinal cord itself or damanged. They were complete due to the massive swelling of the spinal cord and all they had to do is wait and slowly the regained everything as soon as their cord stopped swelling.

          I don't see how its possible to get 100% recovery if nerves coating is damanged or excesss scare tissue is on your cord. Unless your body can regnerate the nerve mylon (spelling) or you can remove the scare tissue then retrain your body.

          I was lucky enough they also got me into the operating room in about 3 hours and gave me steriods to reduce the swelling so it wouldn't continue to squeeze my spainl cord.
          Injured:10-16-04
          C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


          For stalkers convenience:
          Blog:
          http://www.ordealsonwheels.com/
          Facebook:
          http://www.facebook.com/#!/coryssanchez
          Progress:
          http://photobucket.com/albums/b290/swooty/
          My drawings:
          http://kanvases.com/sites/corysanchez/home

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            #20
            check our www.rummerfield.com to see a fully recovered quad. He is amazing. They told me about him when I contacted the Kennedy Krieger Institute for additional therapy for our son. 2 days later he called us and I talked to him for over an hour. He really gave us a lot of hope.

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              #21
              What does it mean? The site didn't give further info regarding his injuries, and the length of time it took him to reach this point. And as we all have read in just this little bit communication with one another, that everyone has a different out look/definition of what 100% recovery truly means to the individual.

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                #22
                Is he pain free? Is he able to do everything that he did before with no limitations? Can he do all that he did before with out pain dictating when the end point will be?

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                  #23
                  [QUOTE
                  I was lucky enough they also got me into the operating room in about 3 hours and gave me steriods to reduce the swelling so it wouldn't continue to squeeze my spainl cord.[/QUOTE]

                  I live with such regret, being so afraid at the time and choice of immediate surgery/exhausted surgery team/son/risks or waiting while my son was stabilized [I had been told]/resting both kid/team still w/ risk but...I believe relieving the pressure as quickly as offered those first couple hours would've brought about more motor return, he's so there with sensation-

                  I am hoping others do not make same mistake in my writing of this... :[ stabilized- does not mean just that.
                  "I want to make a difference! However small it may be~ as long as it's a positive one, then this is what my life will have been about and I will go knowing I did my best.~ T.

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                    #24
                    05survivor, I have the same questions about Rummerfield. He should write a book. I have never found anything that really describes in depth what he did for recovery. I did read somewhere that he does cannot tell where his legs are unless he looks at them. I forget the term for that. Propri0 - something... Many people have said that since he was injured in the 70's, his level of completeness might not have been properly diagnosed and thus was actually very incomplete.

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                      #25
                      I have heard a lot about people being misdiagnosed but personaly I have come to the conclusion that no Doctor or medical professional can predict with certainty recovery in any individual. To do this they would have to be able to count the neurons and the demyelinated axons and attempt to match the results to some kind of pre determined statistical outcome. This is obviously impossible. Im pretty sure though that as medical professionals are unable to provide an accurate prediction they will always predict a negative outcome.

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                        #26
                        I know. The docs tell me that they cannot give me any predictions/outcome regarding my injuries because they just don't know. How's that. They go to school, charge us up the yang, and STILL cannot give me any info?! Sorry. Had to vent a little

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                          #27
                          I agree survior. They love to give negative feedback or no feedback at all. Half the time your an experiment and they just trial and error. If I was newly injuried sci, i would rather have had postive encouragement rather than, no your not going to walk again. I think alittle bit of hope is better than no hope at all.
                          Injured:10-16-04
                          C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


                          For stalkers convenience:
                          Blog:
                          http://www.ordealsonwheels.com/
                          Facebook:
                          http://www.facebook.com/#!/coryssanchez
                          Progress:
                          http://photobucket.com/albums/b290/swooty/
                          My drawings:
                          http://kanvases.com/sites/corysanchez/home

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                            #28
                            I was REALLY lucky. My dad asked the docs(I mean threatened) not to tell me that they thought I would never walk again. So I never heard from them any negativity regarding the possibility of "being normal" (the way I used to think I was told that anything was possible. WHile I wasn't promised any specifics regarding my recovery, I was continually told by almost all the personnel that I could do whatever I put my mind to do. I honestly did not know any thing regarding SCI until it happened to me and I got out of the hospital and did research on my own. I completely agree with the docs treating us like experiments. Trial and error, how can they go wrong with that?! I know that there are doctors that geniuinely help all of us SCI patients, but there seem to be an awful lot of them that don't know what the H E double L they are talking about.

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                              #29
                              ya my family did the same for me. they told the doctors not to tell me i wouldnt walk. i was lucky to walk after 6 months of being paralized.
                              C-5, 6 SCI. Took about 6 months to walk. Walking full time. Without any assistance since Nov. 2003 and will make a full recovery

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                                #30
                                Docs told my family and I that walking would be "unlikely". In rehab I just wanted to hear that it was possible and there are success stories. Unfortunately I couldn't find any...

                                One of the reasons I still frequent this site is to let people know who are in similar situations that there is hope. Recoveries like mine may be unlikely but they do happen.

                                As far as 100% goes, I can do everything I used to just not at the same level. Being an athlete all my life I compare 100% to my former abilities. In everyday life, I CAN do everything I used to pain free. Last week in Yosemite I hiked 5 miles up and down dirt trails with no problem, even outlasted the wife and kids.

                                I suspect Rummerfield also isn't 100%. I'm sure there are lingering sensation impairments or quirky strength oddities such as I have...

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