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Pat Rummerfield to race in the 4-Desert Race

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  • #16
    i;, gettin gkijke a wet blanket

    i believe he's a amazing person, and the fact that he was at the dc rally is a higher bump in my book.
    i am just so cynical nowadays, i hate to discount people that achieved so much with their lives, but i just feel that there are plenty of people here that have tried very hard to be just independent, and havent succeeded, so i when i see someone running the iron man, i am wondering he was very lucky that the 85% of his spinal cord that is not working was not really needed. i am sure there are people here that had impact on 10% and lost more function ..
    i am not sure if i making myself clear, but having met a lot of you i know that you all work hard at your recovery..except for clc he should leran to eat pancakes
    cauda equina

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    • #17
      Originally posted by metronycguy
      i believe he's a amazing person, and the fact that he was at the dc rally is a higher bump in my book.
      i am just so cynical nowadays, i hate to discount people that achieved so much with their lives, but i just feel that there are plenty of people here that have tried very hard to be just independent, and havent succeeded, so i when i see someone running the iron man, i am wondering he was very lucky that the 85% of his spinal cord that is not working was not really needed. i am sure there are people here that had impact on 10% and lost more function ..
      i am not sure if i making myself clear, but having met a lot of you i know that you all work hard at your recovery..except for clc he should leran to eat pancakes
      It seems obvious to me that the guy had the recovery potential to be where he is now, not taking anything from his achievments like I would not for anyone injured or not, but not giving more credit either, ready to be flamed now
      Pharmacist, C4-5 injury but functional C6 (no triceps/flexors)

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      • #18
        Pat Rummerfield is the man! Add another one to his success list!

        6/3/2006 2:11:51 AM - June 3, Finish Line, 12pm - All competitors have crossed the finish line of the Gobi March 2006. The finish line was located in a wheat field overlooking a canyon in a Uygur village complete with dancers and music.

        Pat Rummerfield is the man!

        Finished the Gobi March leg of the 4-desert race!
        Way to go Pat!

        NRGized
        www.energeticfitness.net

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        • #19
          Way to go Pat, I am proud to call you a friend.
          Pat is one of the most genuine and humble folks I have ever met. He is dealing with some of the aging aspects of SCI and keeps on going. He is also always willing to reach out and encourage others who are having a rough time. He is so committed to raising awareness that SCI can be treated and folks can improve.

          All the way Pat, be smart, and be safe.
          Every day I wake up is a good one

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          • #20
            Inspirational guy.

            I hear ye metro. Not to take anything away from PR or anyone who's worked as hard and recovered as much but there are many, many (hundreds) of sci victims who have tried every possible means to regain function and have failed.

            I've tried everything from GM1 when I was first injured, to 4AP, E-stim, gaiting programs, Project Walk and subsequent personal training, Ergys, etc. Granted I've gotten stronger and healthier but recovery of neurological function ~ nada. As a former lifetime competitive athlete and pro cyclist I believe that I've tried to recover with exercise induced connectivity. At this point (came to this conclusion a couple of yrs ago) my spinal cord is going to need some assistance in conductivity either biologically or technically. Personally I'm not sure which is going to benefit us the earliest or the best but technology (nano, etc.) is making some serious strides whereas biology (lack of clinical trials) is stagnated.

            As sad as it is the one benefit of the war with many soldiers suffering and surviving neurological (SCI) and physical (amputations, etc.) injuries is that technology is making progress at a very accelerated pace.

            I think that the question will become which avenue of choice is worth pursuing: Biology or Technology?

            Apologies for the digression of the thread. Oh, and by the way, I learned early on that we only need 10% of our spinal cord intact to function normally. The challenge, at least as I see it, is which 10%?

            Onward and upward ~ kudos to PR

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            • #21
              Pat,

              You are our hero!

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              • #22
                Here is a link to Pat's Blog. His description of the Salt Flats is very vivid.
                http://www.racingtheplanet.com/gobim...eld.shtml#day4
                Every day I wake up is a good one

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                • #23
                  Will do! Seeing him June 19 at the Spinal Cord Research Golf Tournament in Idaho

                  Originally posted by Wise Young
                  NRGized, if you see Pat, can you congratulate him for me? I am so impressed by what he is doing. Wise.
                  Dr. Young,

                  We would be happy to pass the message along personally.
                  Pat will be at the First Annual Spinal Cord Research Golf Tournament at The Couer d'Alene Resort Golf Course in Idaho June 19th.
                  For more info: http://www.next-steps.org/fundraising.htm

                  To download registration form:
                  click here to download registration form

                  If the download link does not work properly, just follow the first link to the fundraising page on www.next-steps.org site and the link is on that page.

                  NRGized
                  www.energeticfitness.net

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                  • #24
                    Patrick Rummerfield: Defying the odds

                    Patrick Rummerfield: Defying the odds
                    By Harry Jackson Jr.
                    ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
                    Monday, Jul. 03 2006

                    How he did it

                    Name: Patrick Rummerfield

                    Age: 52

                    Home: West St. Louis County

                    Occupation: Counselor and fundraiser for the Kennedy Krieger
                    Institute and the International Center for Spinal Cord Injuries, an affiliate
                    of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

                    What he did: Overcame a damaged spinal cord to become an athlete and
                    inspiration to others who suffer from spinal cord injuries.

                    Quotable: "My dad used to tell me, 'The will to win means nothing
                    without the will to work.'"

                    A typical day's meals: Rummerfield's wife, Barbara, is slowly moving
                    to organic foods, especially meat, in order to avoid additives.

                    Breakfast is often granola, fruit with yogurt and omelets using egg whites.

                    Lunch and dinner: They're about the same. A lot of green, leafy vegetables,
                    salads, lean meat such as chicken and a lot of fish. They avoid red meat.

                    They don't eat a lot of sweets, but he does like ice cream.

                    He's now 173 pounds and has been up to 191.


                    After being diagnosed a quadriplegic, he's not just walking - he's racing.

                    Pat Rummerfield may become the most famous athlete in America who has built his
                    reputation on coming in last.

                    That includes Ironman triathlons, marathons, even a 125-mile run in China that
                    he didn't finish because he broke his ankle.

                    Meanwhile, he holds the land-speed records for electric cars and for Model-T
                    antique cars. And he's driven in two NASCAR races.

                    One more thing - he's a quadriplegic.

                    By all science and medical knowledge, he should be paralyzed and in a
                    wheelchair, at best.

                    What happened?

                    In September of 1974, while celebrating his last days of being a bachelor, the
                    21-year-old Rummerfield was the passenger in his 1964 Corvette, speeding at 135
                    mph on Interstate 90 in Idaho. The driver lost control of the car, and it
                    crashed in a roadside ditch.

                    The impact threw Rummerfield's body so violently to the rear that his body
                    sheared off the passenger seat, pushing it to the back of the car. He broke
                    four vertebrae in his neck. Doctors told Rummerfield's father that in three
                    days or so, the young man's body would shut down and he'd die.

                    Rummerfield wasn't convinced. He asked the doctors to place the X-rays above
                    his bed.

                    "I made a promise to God that if he gave me a second chance, I'd help others
                    less fortunate than myself," Rummerfield says.

                    That wasn't likely. Rummerfield said that more than 85 percent of his spinal
                    cord was damaged. People can end up in wheelchairs with 10 to 20 percent damage.

                    "I was considered severed," Rummerfield said.

                    His changes

                    Rummerfield was in good physical condition when the accident happened. He
                    worked as a miner in Idaho, and in high school, he played a number of sports.

                    In fact, he had been practicing to become a race-car driver. That was his
                    dream. He wanted to go to Europe and learn Grand Prix racing, then return and
                    compete in the Indianapolis 500.

                    "A week after the accident, the doctors told my dad, 'We don't know why he's
                    alive,'" Rummerfield says.

                    One day, the doctors stretched their prognosis to three to five years survival
                    and suggested he move to a nursing home. He moved to a long-term care center in
                    San Diego to learn how to use a mouth-controlled wheelchair.

                    The breakthrough

                    Six weeks after the accident, as he struggled to find his limbs, his toe moved.
                    Then again. "I made it move," he said. "I thought, 'In a day or two I'll be
                    walking.'"

                    He remembers the doctor's response: "He said don't get my hopes up, because
                    what could I do with one toe."

                    Rummerfield loathed his condition: "I went from a muscular 208 pounds to 125
                    pounds in five weeks," he said, but "I decided I was going to have the
                    strongest big toe in the world." So he kept working, straining to make body
                    parts move.

                    After a time, he was able to move his entire foot, then his leg, then his other
                    leg. His caretakers - other than his family and friends - continued to tell him
                    that was no big deal; small moves don't mean a future of mobility.

                    Nevertheless, "Bits and pieces were coming back; the other toes," he says. But
                    even that movement hurt. "I started flopping around; it felt like burning, very
                    painful. But if I had feeling, that meant my brain was making new connections."

                    http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/lif...2?OpenDocument
                    http://stores.ebay.com/MAKSYM-Variety-Store

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by bruce
                      Go Pat!

                      I've met him a couple times, most recently at the DC Rally. He inspires me to keep trying to get more than I've got. Right now I can't imagine doing even a tenth of what he's doing, but then it wasn't that long ago that I could hardly imagine doing what I do now. So onward and upward!!
                      Bruce, you just need more time -- keep working and just see what you can do in another ten years!

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