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    E-Stim devices?

    I am looking to get one of those large smart phone sized E-Stim devices that runs on like four AA's or whatever.

    I was at a great rehab hospital (Spaulding in Boston) for about three months, getting an hour and 1/2 of physical therapy every day along with an hour and 1/2 of occupational therapy every day. They had a huge gym with all sorts of equipment, Eriigo, ReWalk, LocoMat, FESBike, etc. My physical therapist there told me that of course any other rehab facility or step down facility or skilled nursing facility that I might transition to after discharge from the hospital would of course at least have these handheld Estim machines as well.

    Now I am at a state hospital mostly for the mentally disabled, the only place (1/50) I applied to that would take me with my level of injury, and of course they do have an OT& PT here, but all I get here is 10 min of leg stretching and Range of Motion each day, no gym, no equipment, no estim.

    I am Looking into buying one of these devices, however I'm not quite sure where to start. I asked my old physical therapist from Spalding and she told me it would be impossible for general member of the public to buy one. She told me that the only way a patient could get one for themselves would be to get a prescription from a doctor for one. This would not be too hard for me to get, given my level of injury, however I want to try to get one as soon as possible since I am merely languishing here in this hospital with no physical therapy and no power wheelchair and no staff that knows how to treat spinal cord injury.

    in my experience you can always buy anything that you are looking for on the Internet, however when I look to try to find devices, all I can find are electric stimulation devices that you put on your Dick..... not exactly what I am looking for at the moment.

    does anyone know where to look for these devices? What companies or brands or models should I be looking for?
    Injured on July 8th 2017 at 28 years old.
    Fractured C4 - C7, Incomplete.

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    #2
    Empi used to make the kind of device you probably want. (EMPI 300PV NMES System Muscle Stimulator)
    you may be able find a used one... and no prescription necessary.

    Not sure which companies would compete with this, but you would have had to get a prescription to get a new unit.

    http://www.pulsemassagers.com/empi-3...le-stimulator/

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      #3
      Both Compex (rechargeable proprietary battery pack, proprietary snap electrodes, many preset programs varying by model) and Intelect (pin electrodes, standard batteries, can also be used as a TENS) units are made by DonJoy - the same parent company that owned and shut down Empi (very sketchy revenue model) - and can be purchased new online without a prescription either directly from compex or from amazon or from medical supply companies. The difficulty is knowing what settings will work for you - for that you need a PT or the willingness to be your own lab rat. The tricky bit of buying used Empis is that there’s nowhere to get them refurbished any more and they use/used proprietary cables, which now cost about $40/pair to replace. There used to be a spreadsheet on the DonJoy website telling which model of intelect and/or compex best replaces which model of empi. The price variables are substantial- the compex units range from ~$700-$300, and the intelect units from about $70-$120. Pricing of electrodes, cables, batteries can add up pretty quickly.

      There are are other professional/institutional use brands which don’t use batteries and plug directly into the wall. IME, many PT practices will help you find refurbished models (which cost about 60-75% of new), and if you’re in a SNF or similar, the PTs may be willing to undertake getting you any necessary Rx and/or LMN.

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        #4
        Are you looking for E.M.S device electro muscle stimulation. or T.E.N.S device Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation .

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          #5
          I use wearable therapy from a company called Axiobionics. It is more expensive, but much better than the ordinary stick-on electrodes. It's not even close!
          www.symbolofstrength.com

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            #6
            My wife is a T9 incomplete (acute care at Spaulding last spring). We have two of the units you describe. Getting a script was as easy as asking for it. They cost less than $100 each.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Other Bruce View Post
              My wife is a T9 incomplete (acute care at Spaulding last spring). We have two of the units you describe. Getting a script was as easy as asking for it. They cost less than $100 each.

              Which unit are you referring to? I want to get one asap!

              Thanks!
              God is good

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Peders View Post
                I use wearable therapy from a company called Axiobionics. It is more expensive, but much better than the ordinary stick-on electrodes. It's not even close!
                Would love to know more.
                T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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                  #9
                  I think you're looking for something like this: http://a.co/9D71Y0S

                  Most TENS units are strong enough to get a decent muscle contraction, provided there isn't too much other tissue (i.e., fat) between the electrodes and the muscles. You can find dozens for less than $100 on Amazon, no prescription required. Most pharmacies carry them too. I would recommend starting with a cheaper unit like one of these before you invest hundreds into a Compex or similar unit.
                  Co-founder & CTO of MYOLYN - FES Technology for People with Paralysis - Empowering People to Move

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                    #10
                    I actually have the ERGYs E-Stim bike right now so my legs can handle a good amount of stim. So I do prefer a good zap on my legs

                    Originally posted by Matt Bellman View Post
                    I think you're looking for something like this: http://a.co/9D71Y0S

                    Most TENS units are strong enough to get a decent muscle contraction, provided there isn't too much other tissue (i.e., fat) between the electrodes and the muscles. You can find dozens for less than $100 on Amazon, no prescription required. Most pharmacies carry them too. I would recommend starting with a cheaper unit like one of these before you invest hundreds into a Compex or similar unit.
                    God is good

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I got a "tens" unit from a chiropractor friend. I wanted to stimulate my calf muscles to improve circulation in my foot where I have two unhealed wounds.
                      At ~60% power, it would seriously trigger my arm muscles but it had NO effect on legs at 100% Similar units sell for less than $50.
                      I posted here somewhere and spinal nurse replied that these types of stimulators will not cause contractions if you have a spinal injury, that somehow the nerves, despite being secondary nerves and not spinal, die.
                      The stimulators that were possibilities were many hundred dollars.
                      69yo male T12 complete since 1995
                      NW NJ

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by pfcs49 View Post
                        I got a "tens" unit from a chiropractor friend. I wanted to stimulate my calf muscles to improve circulation in my foot where I have two unhealed wounds.
                        At ~60% power, it would seriously trigger my arm muscles but it had NO effect on legs at 100% Similar units sell for less than $50.
                        I posted here somewhere and spinal nurse replied that these types of stimulators will not cause contractions if you have a spinal injury, that somehow the nerves, despite being secondary nerves and not spinal, die.
                        The stimulators that were possibilities were many hundred dollars.
                        With a T12 injury, you likely have some lower motor neuron damage. Such damage prevents electrical stimulation with "traditional" parameters from activating the affected muscles properly. Most people with injuries above T12 will be able to get muscle contractions in the legs with a regular TENS unit. For those with lower motor neuron injury, wide pulse stimulation is used, but stimulators with wider pulse widths are expensive and few.
                        Co-founder & CTO of MYOLYN - FES Technology for People with Paralysis - Empowering People to Move

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Everyone with a SCI has both UMN (upper motor neuron) and LMN (lower motor neuron) injury. This is a poor term to use so broadly. When using the terms, you must include which target muscle or organ you are referring to. For example, someone can have a UMN or LMN bladder, or a UMN or LMN gastroc. You have to be specific.

                          (KLD)
                          Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 7 Jun 2018, 8:27 PM.
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                            Everyone with a SCI has both UMN (upper motor neuron) and LMN (LMN) injury. This is a poor term to use so broadly. When using the terms, you must include which target muscle or organ you are referring to. For example, someone can have a UMN or LMN bladder, or a UMN or LMN gastroc. You have to be specific.

                            (KLD)
                            Sorry, you're right, I should have been more specific. As I understand it, injuries to T12 and lower are likely to be accompanied by denervation of major muscle groups in the legs, and it depends on the nature of the injury.
                            Co-founder & CTO of MYOLYN - FES Technology for People with Paralysis - Empowering People to Move

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