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Stand with leg brace??

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    Stand with leg brace??

    I was standing and sort of walking with my leg brace I think its called KAFO ever since I got out of the hospital back in 1994 and since I have a really bad skin break on my bum. I've stopped working out my leg with my leg brace for about 7 years now. I was wondering if I was to stand up with my leg brace will my bones break? By the way I'm a paraplegic with L1/L2

    #2
    It is possible. Check with your physician about getting a bone density test done before you resume full weight bearing.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      After 7 years your brace may need some modifications to fit properly. If you get an okay from the doc, I suggest you get checked out by an orthotist.
      You will find a guide to preserving shoulder function @
      http://www.rstce.pitt.edu/RSTCE_Reso...imb_Injury.pdf

      See my personal webpage @
      http://cccforum55.freehostia.com/

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        #4
        The longest time that I didn't use my leg brace was 1 year and I didn't have any problem and now it's been 7yrs. I check my bone density every 2yrs and last time I got it check they said my bone looks better and stronger can't really remember I'll try to have it check again. The brace fit's fine when I got new brace it didn't work out so I had to use my old brace.

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          #5
          What bones/joints were checked in your DEXA scan? Often only the hips, lumbar spine and wrists are checked (as these are the most common areas for low bone density in post-menopausal women). Lumbar spine may actually be MORE dense in those with SCI, but the most common areas of low density are the proximal tibia (just below the knee), distal femur (just above the knee) and then the neck of the femur. Check to see what areas are being done in your scans.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            #6
            I think it goes down to the femur. Where should I tell them to scan to?

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              #7
              • Proximal tibia
              • Distal femur
              • Femoral neck


              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                #8
                I'll ask about that on my next bone density. Crawling is fine right?

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