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    Former US Olympian Home, Walking ... Less Than 3 Months After ...

    This is now:

    http://www.tmz.com/2016/07/08/jamie-...n-home-injury/

    This was 2 months ago:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RpfpjVdQhv0

    #2
    Would be far more interesting if we knew his injury level and severity.
    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

    Comment


      #3
      But only 2 1/2 months after the injury, Nieto's manager, Paul Doyle, says his client has miraculously recovered ... so much that he's been sent home from the hospital ... and is WALKING with a walker.

      How'd he bounce back? Intense rehab, Doyle says. "He's been treating recovery like a true Olympian."
      Nothing miraculous about it, many completely recover from SCI.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Mize View Post
        Would be far more interesting if we knew his injury level and severity.
        All I know is that when he was admitted to the hospital and then a a week or sometimes later he said it on a video that doctors told him he was incomplete and should expect full recovery. I don't know if he had a surgery as the information is not available.

        Comment


          #5
          So it was mainly paralysis from spinal shock it would appear.
          T3 complete since Sept 2015.

          Comment


            #6
            Some call this a spinal cord "concussion" similar to a brain concussion. It is amazing how many people end up being AIS E (complete recovery of motor and sensory deficits; perhaps some remaining abnormal DTRs), but they get their return almost immediately after injury (within 24-48 hours usually significantly improved).

            I just hate it when the press, etc. make out that this type of return is due to anything other than great good luck. It had nothing to do with how hard he worked, being an Olympian, faith in God, being more determined, etc. etc. That is such an insult to those who do not get return or recovery. He was lucky. That's it.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              Some call this a spinal cord "concussion" similar to a brain concussion. It is amazing how many people end up being AIS E (complete recovery of motor and sensory deficits; perhaps some remaining abnormal DTRs), but they get their return almost immediately after injury (within 24-48 hours usually significantly improved).

              I just hate it when the press, etc. make out that this type of return is due to anything other than great good luck. It had nothing to do with how hard he worked, being an Olympian, faith in God, being more determined, etc. etc. That is such an insult to those who do not get return or recovery. He was lucky. That's it.

              (KLD)
              True, but let's not minimize the role of hard work. Some return IS based on hard work and determination. Didn't Wise's recent publication cite something like 6 hours a day of walking/gait training, for 6 months, in order to achieve its results?!? That is hard work and requires a great deal of determination. Lazy people can be lucky and get return, due to the nature of their injury, true enough, but for the rest of us it won't happen by itself, or just with a doctor's treatment, as Wise is demonstrating.
              "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

              "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                Some call this a spinal cord "concussion" similar to a brain concussion. It is amazing how many people end up being AIS E (complete recovery of motor and sensory deficits; perhaps some remaining abnormal DTRs), but they get their return almost immediately after injury (within 24-48 hours usually significantly improved).

                I just hate it when the press, etc. make out that this type of return is due to anything other than great good luck. It had nothing to do with how hard he worked, being an Olympian, faith in God, being more determined, etc. etc. That is such an insult to those who do not get return or recovery. He was lucky. That's it.

                (KLD)
                I AGREE 100 percent.....He was Lucky is all.....seen it happen around here once 40 years ago. All the work in the world won't bring something back if its not meant to be......Lucky
                Art

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hard work can certainly maximize the functionality of any return achieved, but it is not going to cause return to occur with an injury like this.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I wonder how many people didn't even try because they believed the narrative that recovery is all about the luck of the injury; that they can't do anything to help themselves? I was like that for the 14 months, or so, until I met a therapist that advocated gait training. After 6 months of trying that I could stand for a minute on my left leg. Then I got both sides hip flexors back. Would that have happened without trying?! Who knows, but the first 14 months I got nothing. I think it is more important to focus on trying than dismissing it as "luck".
                    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                    Comment


                      #11
                      It is lime being kicked when you read articles attributing recovery to effort and a positive attitude because the inference is that if you did not get the same recovery it is a reflection on your lack of trying. Making the most of any function that your injuries leave you with undoubtedly takes effort and nobody should decry someone for making that effort. However, when reporting on "recoveries" journalists must acknowledge that return of function is also dependent on the injury and that lack of return does not mean a lack of effort or a poor attitude.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I want to add that he was told to make a full recovery I think. Here is all his videos and he talks about it starting in the first week. Just go down a little to see the oldest videos.

                        https://www.youtube.com/results?q=Ja...to&sp=CAI%253D

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Paralyzed Former Olympian Walks Down the Aisle With His Wife: 'It Was a Goal for Me'

                          http://www.insideedition.com/headlin...was-a-goal-for

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Drives me crazy to see these things. How many brides are walking down the aisle these days without a wheelchair? What's wrong with rolling down the aisle? I spent the first few years of my injury trying to please my family members and myself. I thought if I worked hard enough, I'd recover. When I finally stopped going to therapy everyday, i took back my life. I'm a chair user and I'm okay with that.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Lucky guy

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