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    quad gut or bely fat?

    Is there a way to distinguish between a quad cut resulting from the paralysis of abdominal muscles, and belly fat? I'm not really heavy, but there is a little roundness to my belly.

    Thanks for any help.
    Alan

    Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

    #2
    Originally posted by alan View Post
    Is there a way to distinguish between a quad cut resulting from the paralysis of abdominal muscles, and belly fat? I'm not really heavy, but there is a little roundness to my belly.

    Thanks for any help.
    Lie down on your back and put one arm up over your head to stretch out your torso; this will allow gravity to "sink" your abs. Pinch your gut and you'll get a sense as to how much of your girth is fat and how much isn't.
    stephen@bike-on.com

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      #3
      Get your body weight using a roll-on scale and compare it to a height and weight chart, keeping in mind that a quad should be, I believe, close to 10% less than the recommended weight for an able-bodied person. Meaning if your ideal weight is 165, you should be probably down about 150- 155, accounting for loss of bone and muscle mass.

      You can also get your measurements to calculate body mass index (BMI) and see where you fit in with this. The charts also give you a BMI based on height and weight.

      You are within a reasonable weight range, then I would be less concerned about the appearance of quad belly.

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        #4
        Good advice, Crags.
        CKF
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          I suppose it could be gas.
          Alan

          Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by crags View Post
            Get your body weight using a roll-on scale and compare it to a height and weight chart, keeping in mind that a quad should be, I believe, close to 10% less than the recommended weight for an able-bodied person. Meaning if your ideal weight is 165, you should be probably down about 150- 155, accounting for loss of bone and muscle mass.
            It's a lot more than 10% i think. I weighed 165 lbs before and now am down to 120 lbs and my upper body has way more muscle than before.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by crags View Post
              You are within a reasonable weight range, then I would be less concerned about the appearance of quad belly.
              I would be very concerned with it, you don't want your organs squishing and being pushed around from fat cause it's already happening from being slouched, sitting and being stagnant all the time. and really it makes you look far more disabled or abnormal whatever you want to call it, it really does; your body proportion just becomes totally off (which as a quadriplegic unless very incomplete or lower injury it inevitably will be) but with quad belly it can become very very bad! Try to stand as much as possible, do physiotherapy,only eat healthy fats, watch your calories, eat foods to help digestion (Ginger, turmeric, Cayanne pepper,digestive enzyme supplement etc),and use fairly strong electrostimulation on your core for 45 minutes ( keeping in mind things like your bladder are there don't want to hit those)! If you have the luxury of some core function, don't take that for granted and use it. Once your body gets used to it the core is one of the muscles that can be exercised 4+ days a week! But seriously don't let it get bad, especially if you're young, it's slim pickings enough for young quadriplegics, don't let the body proportion get completely out of control; look around at some of the rehab places for the high quadriplegics it's really bad man, that will motivate you. Sorry but had to be said!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BlownM3 View Post
                It's a lot more than 10% i think. I weighed 165 lbs before and now am down to 120 lbs and my upper body has way more muscle than before.
                Really Depends on your level of cervical injury, and its severity! But yes, I would agree with you in general it would be a lot more than 10%.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hello everyone,

                  I know this thread is a few months old I was browsing around wanting to see what others had to say about their quad bellies. Like most people with one I'm sick of having one as well and nothing I seem to do will get rid of it! On top of that I have a colostomy and so when my stoma swells it adds another 2 inches to my already swollen belly.

                  When I first get up into my chair in the morning I'm actually able to see a portion of my cushion between my legs :-) however as the day wears on and my belly expands that is no longer possible. I'm thinking about getting a strap or binder to help hold it in however most ride up the back as the day wears on plus squishes the colostomy bag. All I know is I'm sick of it and it's becoming a obsession!

                  Well for anyone who reads this thanks for letting me BITCH........
                  Courage is being scared to death but saddling up anyway. .(John Wayne)

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                    #10
                    You can always wear an Abdominal Binder, but there is Nothing you can do about gravity pushing organs down into your belly.
                    Last edited by Cris; 22 Jul 2016, 11:59 AM. Reason: Spelling & Grammar

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                      #11
                      Would liposuction keep fat out of the gut? I only ask this because one time I watched someone having it performed on a TV series, the doctor said that the fat may not grow back in that section, but it would go to her legs or elsewhere if she didn?t exercise. Theoretically, if you don?t have a weight problem, you remove fat cells from gut, would that completely take away para/quad belly?

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Le Todd View Post
                        Would liposuction keep fat out of the gut? I only ask this because one time I watched someone having it performed on a TV series, the doctor said that the fat may not grow back in that section, but it would go to her legs or elsewhere if she didn?t exercise. Theoretically, if you don?t have a weight problem, you remove fat cells from gut, would that completely take away para/quad belly?
                        I wondered the same and also if this CoolSculpting therapy... not that I could afford either unless I win the lottery. lol

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                          #13
                          I agree I hate my quad gut I had no tummy before this and I was 50 now I look like a......

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I am interested in bumping this thread because I want to try to figure out some good exercises to work on abdominal muscles. Originally after I got hurt I did not have any sort of gut, I did not develop any of this probably for a couple of years after I got hurt. However, now I definitely notice this, especially when I'm standing up.

                            My stomach hangs out significantly when I stand up. Before I was injured I was about 5’7’’-5’8’’, roughly 140-150 pounds. I was always very active with not a shred of fat on my body. I work out Side, Doing a lot of outdoor construction, and was always very active. Now I am probably about 135 pounds 4 years after injury, roughly C4/C-5 injury.

                            I am always been incredibly thin and very lean, I’m a pretty small guy I’ve always been very strong for my size, once again, I have no extra weight on me. This is one unacceptable situation out of Many unacceptable situations that I have to deal with these days. I need to find the answer and a solution.

                            Can anyone suggest any exercises?
                            Injured on July 8th 2017 at 28 years old.
                            Fractured C4 - C7, Incomplete.

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                            • SCI-Nurse
                              SCI-Nurse commented
                              Editing a comment
                              Your duplicate post has been removed. Please don't post duplicate threads or responses in different forums. Thanks. (KLD)

                            #15
                            Do you have voluntary control over your abdominal muscles? That would be required for exercises to help with this, and it would involve common abdominal exercise such as sit-ups.

                            If you have no voluntary control over those muscles, you can consider electrical stim, although since it has been a number of years since your injury, getting atrophied muscles to tighten up after being overstretch by the weight of your abdominal contents for so many years may not be very successful. That is the cause of "quad belly"; not excessive fat (for most).

                            Wearing an abdominal binder from early post injury can help prevent this, but does not correct it once it has occurred.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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