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  • first handcycle?

    i am interested in buying my first handcycle. i plan on using it for recreation, working up to a marathon. it would also be nice to have the option of using it on unpaved surfaces at times. i am quite concerned with being able to transfer in and out of it, so i don't want anything super low. and, since i'm a beginner, i'm looking for something with good quality at a reasonable price. i'm t3 complete by the way. any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

  • #2
    Freedom Ryder FRH or FRH1A or Lasher. Also look into a Roadrace Power Pod. Mark Brerton at Roadrace had a Intrepid for sale at a great price.

    Handycling is probably one of the bet things you can do for yourself.

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    • #3
      How can I get info on the intrepid that he has for sale?

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      • #4
        sales@roadracepowerpod.com would be a way. or look up his profile and send an email.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by tarantella View Post
          i plan on using it for recreation, working up to a marathon. it would also be nice to have the option of using it on unpaved surfaces at times. i am quite concerned with being able to transfer in and out of it, so i don't want anything super low.
          I have a gorgeous 27-speed Top End XLT Gold in House of Kolor Sunrise Pearl for sale:









          The bike is race ready and is in excellent condition. It has high quality components, carbon fiber upgrades, and titanium hardware. It is light and not super low, so it's easy to transfer in and out of it. Plus, it doesn't bottom out over speed bumps and can climb steep hills with ease. I won two marathons in it, even going up against lower bikes, so it's no slouch. Comes with matching medium/large helmet. PM me if interested.

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          • #6
            If you are a first-time triker, it is extremely important that you actually sit in some different trikes and test how each feels on your body. Most trikes are highly adjustable, but just as a wheelchair is not one size fits all, one trike that is perfect for one rider is pure hell for another.

            A penny saved on initial cost is not worth putting up with a trike that you will not find comfortable and will therefore not ride as often.

            I don't know where you live, but I would be happy to help you find the closest shops that have a few different ones to try. There may also be riders near you who you can ask for a test drive. I have never known a triker who didn't want to show off his baby.

            You might also look for a rally passing near you. The riders will be glad to talk to anyone with an interest.

            When I got my trike, I did a ton of research, shortlisted five trikes, and arranged for a drive out to the shop to test them out. (I was recovering at Walter Reed at the time). The trike I came home with wasn't even on my short list. It was a different model from one of my shortlisted manufacturers. But it just felt right for me.
            Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

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            • #7
              I never got to try my first handcycle but I bought it from bike-on and they do have a return policy you have to give measurement's and there are adjustments in most Handcycles. you get what you pay for. No Freedom Ryder's unless you want to be stuck with a heavy out of date hand cycle..JMOP..Compared to Top End they are years behind.

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              • #8
                Crash you have no idea of the quality of a F/R. For a t/3 rec. rider who doesn't want to sit low, I'd look at the Freedeom Ryder FRh of FRH 1A. He said he didn't want to sit low. A t/3 should be able to transfer in and out of the FRH without any difficulty at all. There's no knee lifting when turning a corner like there is with the T/E rec. bikes. Much more adjustment for the cranks also in the F/R.

                Fi looking for a good used bike, Richards T/E would be a great deal though it's a longer transfer.

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                • #9
                  Patrick yes I do now the quality of F/R I have 2 buddy's who have had them and neither one said they would ever buy one again. I have been riding with them for the last 8 yrs. You do get what you pay for and for 4,000 for a F/R I would spend a little less and by a G. Richard has a real nice bike for sale. That is nicer than a new F/R by far.

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                  • #10
                    The guy is a T/3 who doesn't want to sit low. The G is what 4 inches off the ground. Legs lift up when a person makes a sharp turn. Road compensators rip if turned too sharp or fork not supported when transferring. I've owned two G's. They were okay but all the above is a constant occurance on that style. They're basically the same style as a Top End Pro or Gold, just configured to sit lower.

                    I'm not knocking a T/E and haven't said anything a T/E owner doesn't experience. Would sure like to know what your friends didn't like about a F/R

                    Perhaps your buddies want to race and ride a Force of somekind. I nor anyone else I know have any complaints on the Freedom Ryder quality. I've made major changes on my FRH as I did all my other bikes but not because I had too. Richards G is a great bike because he made it that way and is designed for a lower injury level.

                    As the poster said, He wants to do rec. riding with building up to a marathon and ride offroad. I know from owning them a G is not conducive to riding off road because of the trail clearnce on a G. Both bikes ahve their qualities. If a person wants to race, avoid speed bumps and ride smooth roads; a T/E Force is a good bike. If a person want to ride rec. and do what the poster wants in a bike, there are others to look at. F/R being one and Lasher being another.

                    I don't want to get into a pissing contest with you but saying a F/r is junk when you've never ridden one is disingenuous.
                    Last edited by Patrick Madsen; 04-22-2013, 12:31 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by crash86 View Post
                      Patrick yes I do now the quality of F/R I have 2 buddy's who have had them and neither one said they would ever buy one again. I have been riding with them for the last 8 yrs. You do get what you pay for and for 4,000 for a F/R I would spend a little less and by a G. Richard has a real nice bike for sale. That is nicer than a new F/R by far.
                      Your full of crap. The freedom ryder bikes are great bikes. They come with better components STANDARD, whereas the top end come with crap components. A person(much like myself)will spend twice as much money upgrading components on the Top End to make a decent ride. For a beginner the FR is a very good choice if one is worried about being too low and problem getiing on and off. If the person wanted to get serious about racing later on, then a person would ber better off with a lower sitting bike as sitting higher does slow you down. I have both and still use the FR often for leisure riding, it is slower but turns betters easier to get off and on, and a little more comfortable for everyday use. My top end is quite faster, but is easily twice the cost after upgrades. Before the upgrades it wasn't really any faster than my FR.

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                      • #12
                        What can I say I'm a recreational rider and I love my FR. I would not want to sit any lower down because I like to look around and see the world go by, which leaves out all the lay flat bikes. Plus for me I can use my stomach muscles when pushing forward, because I am sitting more upright. Six pack anyone? And I must say that I'm totally impressed with the components that came with the bike, while I have changed out cables and adjust them a lot, the shifters are top of the line according to my local bike shop, and after 2000 miles I have had no problems at all with them.
                        T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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                        • #13
                          Check to see if there are any adaptive sports groups near you that have bikes you can try. There are so many differences in handcycles and being a high-level para you may find the lean to ride bikes like Freedom Ryder are not a good option. US Handcycling site has a decent list of resources. I hope it works out for you. I have been riding for 15 years and absolutely live for it.

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                          • #14
                            I wouldn't let the transfer decide what trike you should get. There are many ways to get in and out of these trikes. I know a guy that is a c5 and with some help he gets in and out of a Top End Force R and RX. I have no problem at all transferring in and out of my Top End Force RX independently as a C7. If you are wanting to do marathons and possibly other endurance racing I would go with the Force RX. Best bang for the buck. Plus they are way more fun and aerodynamic. By far the most efficient style of hand cycle for higher levels. Here is a link to a video I made a while back. It shows me getting in with ease and I use the same technique to get out.

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1QwDLG-JIc

                            The biggest advantage to a hand cycle like the RX is you don't have to worry about supporting your trunk. It isolates your shoulders and you get max power out of them. I don't like to buy gear twice. So I generally buy what I want in the end. Saves a lot of money. I also own a Lasher ATH and would not recommend it. It is limiting on the hills. Because it is front wheel driven it doesn't take that steep of a grade to make the wheel spin on dirt. If you are doing mostly road riding go with a road trike. I bought the Lasher to act as both an on and off road hand cycle and don't like it for either. Thats the problem with trying to make one piece of gear act as two. The Nuke from Reactive Adaptations looks like an awesome off road hand cycle with few limitations. This is just my opinion but if you ever have any transfer question or any other for that matter feel free to send them my way.

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                            • #15
                              hey I know that guy. lol. you are so right, NEVER let the transfer dictate what you ride. heres the car lift I use. any questions john@bike-on.com


                              Originally posted by Joesstone View Post
                              I wouldn't let the transfer decide what trike you should get. There are many ways to get in and out of these trikes. I know a guy that is a c5 and with some help he gets in and out of a Top End Force R and RX. I have no problem at all transferring in and out of my Top End Force RX independently as a C7. If you are wanting to do marathons and possibly other endurance racing I would go with the Force RX. Best bang for the buck. Plus they are way more fun and aerodynamic. By far the most efficient style of hand cycle for higher levels. Here is a link to a video I made a while back. It shows me getting in with ease and I use the same technique to get out.

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1QwDLG-JIc

                              The biggest advantage to a hand cycle like the RX is you don't have to worry about supporting your trunk. It isolates your shoulders and you get max power out of them. I don't like to buy gear twice. So I generally buy what I want in the end. Saves a lot of money. I also own a Lasher ATH and would not recommend it. It is limiting on the hills. Because it is front wheel driven it doesn't take that steep of a grade to make the wheel spin on dirt. If you are doing mostly road riding go with a road trike. I bought the Lasher to act as both an on and off road hand cycle and don't like it for either. Thats the problem with trying to make one piece of gear act as two. The Nuke from Reactive Adaptations looks like an awesome off road hand cycle with few limitations. This is just my opinion but if you ever have any transfer question or any other for that matter feel free to send them my way.
                              Bike-on.com rep
                              John@bike-on.com
                              c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                              sponsored handcycle racer

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