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  • Hitting a Plateau?

    On a recent post, I kind of off-handedly mentioned the notion of hitting a “plateau” in my recovery…and it got me to thinking. I realize that we will always be learning tricks and techniques that will help us deal with realities, BUT I’m sure that to some degree we do hit a “plateau” where our rate of learning and progress flattens out.

    I’m 3 and a half years post. Year 1 was a parade of complications and hospitalizations and I always seemed to be returning to ground zero. Year 2 was back to work and with that focus I let my PT slide. Only in year 3 did things come together enough that I could finally deal with all the SCI crap (literally) along with everyday life…and I made real progress in my strength, transfers, skills, etc.

    But in reflecting on that earlier post, I realize that my progress has slowed in the last 6 months…and that’s worrisome. So I was wondering…did you hit a plateau? ...and did you realize it at the time or was it only with time/perspective that you recognized it?

    I’m a T2 complete, 4/10/09.

    Carts

  • #2
    What do you mean by plateau? Is it your tolerance, health, return, etc..?
    Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

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    • #3
      Sorry I was not more clear. I'm really talking about physical capabilities and skills. I just don't see the progress I was making in earlier months and it's frustrating. Is it me or have I hit a wall?

      Carts

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      • #4
        I wouldn't say you hit wall. You DO get to a point where you say "that's all I can do". But once you realize that "maybe this isn't all I can do", you push yourself a lot more.
        At your level, I would think you can be completely independent. Are you? And do you find yourself accepting help because you were kind of taught that way?
        Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

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        • #5
          Living with a disabilty takes an incredible amount of work. If you've reached the maximium you can do physically there's nothing bad about that. Why do we expect ourselves to be superheros? You should be proud of all the progress you've made. Don't worry about a 'plateau'....you'll likely continue to make progress in smaller increments.

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          • #6
            I AM independent...completely independent. And I do not seek help unless I absolutely need it. I simply stepped back and realized that my rate of progress in mastering things I can do physically was slowing...things such as new, difficult transfers. Maybe I'm not pushing (I don't think that's the case but?) or maybe it's reasonable to hit a plateau. I was just wondering how others felt when/if they reached such a point and how they dealt with it?

            Carts

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            • #7
              Carts,

              Maybe you're setting up your own plateau. You know what I mean?

              For me, I only do or don't do what I allow myself to. Of course, I know I'm not going to run a mile, but I mean realistic things/feats. Bowling is a great example for me. I know I can bowl, and would love to do so, but I've allowed my "disability" to say I can't do that. Maybe that's my plateau?
              Rollin' since '89. Complete C8

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              • #8
                Originally posted by avictoria View Post
                Living with a disabilty takes an incredible amount of work. If you've reached the maximium you can do physically there's nothing bad about that. Why do we expect ourselves to be superheros? You should be proud of all the progress you've made. Don't worry about a 'plateau'....you'll likely continue to make progress in smaller increments.
                This ^^^^ is spot-on.
                Do what you can do with what you've got and try to be happy.
                It's a hard row to hoe we have been served with, for sure.
                Sounds like your doing well - it sucks to be held back, as I was a person who believed limits were meant to be exceeded - well, nowadays some times that's just surviving the work day - some days it's rowing the Grand Canyon - it's hard - that's all I've got.
                Steve Garro. www.coconinocycles.blogspot.com

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                • #9
                  i think your assessment of your recovery is true and common to many people with a sci. it is not apparent however until you look upon your progress in reflection. everyday leads to adaptation whether it is in physical strength and technique, mental capability etc. but it is only appreciated once you look back upon your time a whole maybe.

                  as far as your experiencing a plateau i'd say i'm sure you are. what i suggest just from my own experience with the perceived halt in progress is that you need to challenge yourself. whether in your daily routine or in exercise. you may have just peaked at what you try to do?

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